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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Kam Jugdev, Gita Mathur and Christian Cook

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this paper is to examine two instruments: the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS). Since there is a paucity of literature in project management anchored within the MBI and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS), this paper proposes a high-level model on burnout in project management, drawing on the literature underlying these two instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conceptual approach, the paper reviews the social psychology literature on burnout and then the narrow stream of literature on burnout in project management. The paper develops and proposes a conceptual model as a foundation to explore the links between the determinants of project manager burnout/engagement and turnover/retention.

Findings

This paper contributes to an improved understanding of the determinants of project manager burnout, engagement, turnover, and retention.

Practical implications

The driver for this research is to contribute to the emerging literature on burnout in project management and strategies to help improve engagement and retention of project managers in the discipline – specifically, their tenure in organizations and/or the profession.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the topic of burnout in the project management context. An improved understanding of the stressors in project management contexts, and the mechanisms to mitigate the stress, can add to our understanding of project manager well-being, engagement and retention, improved project success, and healthier work environments.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Kam Jugdev, Gita Mathur and Tak Fung

The purpose of this paper is to study how project-level performance mediates the effect of project management assets on firm-level performance by examining the direct and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how project-level performance mediates the effect of project management assets on firm-level performance by examining the direct and mediated relationships between the project management process characteristics: valuable, rare, inimitable and organizationally supported on project-level and firm-level performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes data from an online survey completed by 198 North American Project Management Institute® members. Linear regression and Sobel Tests are used to examine the relationships between nine factors extracted from an exploratory factor analysis that comprise project management asset characteristics, one factor that comprises project-level performance outcomes, and one factor that comprises firm-level performance outcomes.

Findings

Not only does project-level performance positively and significantly affect firm-level performance, but project-level performance also significantly mediates the effect of project management asset characteristics (for all nine factors) on firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include sample size and self-report bias, calling for a larger sample in ongoing research.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the stream of literature on project management assets as sources of competitive advantage and makes the case for sustained organizational investments in the project management process.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited, but increasing interest in applying the resource-based view of the firm to project management capabilities as a source of competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Ana Azevedo, Kam Jugdev and Gita Mathur

This research draws on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and applies it to a study of competitive advantage in the project management context…

Abstract

Purpose

This research draws on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and applies it to a study of competitive advantage in the project management context. The relationship between the characteristics of project management resources, focusing on organizational support for the project management process, and outcomes of the project management process are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data gathered from 437 North American project management professionals with an existing survey tool that was used in a prior smaller sample study. The study uses Barney’s VRIO framework that assesses resources as valuable (V), rare (R), inimitable (I) and organizationally supported to leverage their value (O). The conceptual model hypothesizes relationships between the project management asset characteristics (valuable, rare, and inimitable), organizational support for the project management process, and project management performance outcomes (both project and firm level). Hypotheses are tested using factors extracted from a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The factors extracted include two factors representing valuable project management asset characteristics, one factor representing rare project management asset characteristics, one factor representing inimitable project management asset characteristics, two factors representing organizational support for the project management process, one factor representing project-level performance and one factor representing firm-level performance.

Findings

Project management assets that are considered valuable and organizational support for the project management process are found to contribute positively to project management process outcomes. No advantage was perceived from rare and inimitable project management assets. Project-level performance was found to significantly mediate the relationship between organizational support and firm-level performance.

Practical implications

This study draws managerial attention to organizational support for the project management process as a source of competitive advantage through its positive affect on both project-as well as firm-level performance.

Originality/value

The study uses a survey tool from previous research with a new, larger dataset to contribute to the understanding of the importance of organizational support for the project management process in a quest for both project success as well as a firm's competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

David Perkins, Gita Mathur and Kam Jugdev

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and apply it to a study of competitive advantage in the project…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and apply it to a study of competitive advantage in the project management context. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is used to examine the factors that constitute strategic characteristics of project management resources and outcomes of the project management process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study gathered data from 437 North American project management professionals using an existing survey tool from prior research involving a smaller sample.

Findings

The final model derived from CFA demonstrated construct validity, meaning acceptable convergent and discriminant validity. It showed only minor differences from a prior exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The final model consisted of two factors representing valuable project management characteristics, one factor representing rare project management characteristics, one factor representing inimitable project management characteristics, three factors representing organizational support for project management assets, one factor representing project-level performance and one factor representing firm-level performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include self-report bias and the use of a panel for data collection.

Practical implications

This study draws managerial attention to project management characteristics that constitute a source of competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The study validates a survey tool from previous research, reflects few deviations from factor structure of the prior EFA, and sets the stage for future research to elaborate on the conceptual model. It extends understanding of the characteristics of project management assets that lead to a firm’s competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Gita Mathur, Kam Jugdev and Tak Shing Fung

The purpose of this paper is to examine characteristics of project management assets and project management performance outcomes as a step towards exploring the link…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine characteristics of project management assets and project management performance outcomes as a step towards exploring the link between assets being valuable, rare, inimitable, and having organizational support and the achievement of competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes data from responses to an online survey by 198 North American Project Management Institute® members. Exploratory factor analysis is used to identify characteristics of project management assets and project management performance outcomes.

Findings

In total, six factors that comprised the characteristics of project management assets, three factors that comprised organizational support for project management assets, and two factors that comprised the project management performance outcomes were extracted.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include sample size, response rate, and self‐report bias, calling for a larger sample in ongoing research. This study is a step towards making the link between project management assets and performance outcomes.

Practical implications

This study draws managerial attention to project management assets as sources of competitive advantage, applying the resource based view of the firm that assets are sources of competitive advantage if they add economic value, are rare, are difficult to imitate, and have organizational support.

Originality/value

Few papers have applied the resource based view of the firm to examine project management capabilities as a source of competitive advantage. This paper contributes to the literature on the resource based view of the firm and contributes to an improved understanding of project management as a source of competitive advantage.

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Kam Jugdev and Gita Mathur

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework to classify project management resources as sources of competitive advantage.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework to classify project management resources as sources of competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the resource‐based view of the firm and project management literature to explore the level of competitive advantage from 17 project management resources based on their degree of complexity and level of leverage in the project management process. This exploratory study drew on a small sample of practitioners in the classification.

Findings

The paper proposes a conceptual model to show the relationship between four categories of resources and their contribution to competitive advantage by being valuable, rare, inimitable, and organizationally supported.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is exploratory in nature and uses a small sample of practitioners.

Practical implications

The authors believe that the classification of project management resources based on complexity and leverage provides a useful framework for managers considering the impact of investment in these resources for competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper provides a classification of project management resources based on the complexity of the resource and its leverage in the project management process. It is posited that resources that are complex and can be highly leveraged to develop further resources warrant attention as sources of competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Gita Mathur, Kam Jugdev and Tak Shing Fung

The aim of this paper is to examine the links between project management process characteristics and project-level and firm-level performance outcomes to test the…

2319

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the links between project management process characteristics and project-level and firm-level performance outcomes to test the hypotheses that project management assets being valuable, rare, inimitable and having organizational support leads to competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes data from responses to an online survey by 198 North American Project Management Institute® members. Regression analysis is used to examine the relationship between six factors extracted from an exploratory factor analysis that comprise the three project management asset characteristics – valuable, rare and inimitable, three factors that comprise organizational support for the project management process, and two factors that comprise project management performance outcomes – project-level and firm-level performance.

Findings

Organizational support for the project management process, specifically project management integration, was found to significantly contribute to both project-level and firm-level performance. Of the asset factors examined, valuable project management knowledge was found to contribute to project-level and firm-level performance, though information technology (IT) tools did not. Inimitable proprietary tangible assets were found to contribute to both project-level and firm-level performance, and inimitable embedded intangible assets were also found to contribute to firm-level performance. Rare knowledge sharing tools and techniques were found to negatively contribute to project-level performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include sample size, response rate and self-report bias, calling for a larger sample in ongoing research.

Practical implications

This study draws managerial attention to project management assets as sources of competitive advantage, highlighting the need to have organizational support for the project management process through organizational integration, and emphasizing the importance of valuable project management knowledge-based assets and inimitable project management assets that are proprietary and tangible as well as those that are embedded and intangible.

Originality/value

Few papers have applied the resource-based view of the firm to examine project management capabilities as a source of competitive advantage. This paper contributes to the literature on the resource-based view of the firm and to an improved understanding of project management as a source of competitive advantage.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Kam Jugdev, David Perkins, Joyce Fortune, Diana White and Derek Walker

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between project delivery success factors, project management tools, software, and methods.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between project delivery success factors, project management tools, software, and methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A statistical analysis was undertaken using data from a survey from a purposive sample of 150 participants across three countries (Australia, Canada and the UK). The findings were used to consider the relationships between project success factors, project management tools, software, and methods.

Findings

The findings reveal certain insights in the use of tools and methodologies. Of all the variables measured, the number of project management tools used and the number of risk tools used showed the highest direct correlation. It was therefore surmised that the use of tools from one of these categories is often coincident with the use of tools from the other category. Also, the use of project management tools exhibited less variability as compared to use of information communication technology support tools and risk management tools. In addition, use of formal project management methods exhibited less variability than use of formal decision‐making methods. Therefore, it is suggested that use of project management tools and methods is more consistent across the organizations studied, as compared to other tools and methods.

Originality/value

This paper extends the survey findings of an international 2011 study and sheds light on the use of project management and related tools and methods.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Kam Jugdev and Gita Mathur

This paper aims to present a high‐level conceptual framework to strengthen the conceptual bridge between project management and workplace learning by applying situated…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a high‐level conceptual framework to strengthen the conceptual bridge between project management and workplace learning by applying situated learning theory to project management practice to guide shared learning within and between projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper bridges situated learning theory from the workplace learning literature and the resource‐based view (RBV) of project management from the strategic management literature, using them as lenses to view two learning mechanisms in the project management domain, project reviews and communities of practices.

Findings

The paper finds that situated learning theory can be applied to project management to highlight processes that enable capability development through shared project learning.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual in nature and intended to make a case for empirical research that draws on workplace learning literature which is useful to project management as there remains the challenge of leveraging these perspectives for project management practice.

Practical implications

The paper believes that situated learning theory offers insights that can be leveraged to make project management environments more effective through improved intra‐project and inter‐project shared learning.

Originality/value

This paper presents a high‐level conceptual framework to bridge situated learning theory to the RBV of project management. The paper finds that situated learning theory is well suited to contribute to an understanding of shared learning in projects and justifies future research.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

1 – 10 of 29