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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kaitlyn DeGhetto, Trey Sutton and Michelle L. Zorn

The purpose of this paper is to identify and theoretically delineate the government-based institutional drivers of “born-public ventures” – ventures that seek to fulfill…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and theoretically delineate the government-based institutional drivers of “born-public ventures” – ventures that seek to fulfill government contracts or sell goods and services to government agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop theory that explains how the government influences the pursuit of public sector opportunities, thereby influencing where new ventures expend their finite effort. Specifically, the authors use institutional theory to delineate the regulatory, cognitive, and normative drivers of born-public ventures. In doing so, the authors highlight both the government’s regulative and non-regulative institutional influences. Finally, the authors present a research agenda to encourage further understanding of this important phenomenon.

Findings

The authors find that the government can affect the allocation of finite entrepreneurial effort toward or away from public sector opportunities by using regulative, normative, and cognitive institutional forces. This influence is important because entrepreneurship targeted at the public sector likely has broad implications for the economy and society as a whole.

Originality/value

Despite recent attention to questions about entrepreneurial allocation, scholars have largely overlooked the importance of why some new ventures choose to allocate their effort toward public sector opportunities. Given the growing number of public sector opportunities and the potential economic and societal implications associated with pursuing these opportunities, research is needed to understand this allocative choice. By introducing the phenomenon of born-public ventures and outlining important research questions, this theoretical paper provides the foundation for further work on this topic.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Kaitlyn DeGhetto, Zachary A. Russell and Gerald R. Ferris

Large-scale organizational change, such as seen through mergers and acquisitions, CEO succession, and corporate entrepreneurship, sometimes is necessary in order to allow…

Abstract

Large-scale organizational change, such as seen through mergers and acquisitions, CEO succession, and corporate entrepreneurship, sometimes is necessary in order to allow firms to be competitive. However, such change can be unsettling to existing employees, producing considerable uncertainty, conflict, politics, and stress, and thus, must be managed very carefully. Unfortunately, to date, little research has examined the relationships among change efforts, perceptions of political environments, and employee stress reactions. We introduce a conceptual model that draws upon sensemaking theory and research to explain how employees perceive and interpret their uncertain environments, the politics in them, and the resulting work stress, after large-scale organizational change initiatives. Implications of our proposed conceptualization are discussed, as are directions for future research.

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

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