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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

François Lambotte and Dominique Meunier

The research process is commonly viewed as a succession of linear, structured and planned practices that exclude informal and unplanned practices, engaging with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The research process is commonly viewed as a succession of linear, structured and planned practices that exclude informal and unplanned practices, engaging with the unexpected or the uncertain. The authors’ aim is to explore this aspect of researching in connection with the narratives of researchers as they oscillate between past and present, theory and empiricism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first draw on the concept of “bricolage” to validate informal research practices as researchers seek to lend “thickness” to their research. To deal with the apparent “messiness” of research narratives, they apply the concepts of kairotic time and action nets. Kairotic times are key moments in research narratives when actions, under tension, interconnect to form action nets, which, in turn, generate meaning or knowledge.

Findings

The authors analyse two research episodes. The first recounts how personal experiences and contingencies influence a researcher's choice of research objects and his associated theoretical reflections. The second highlights how some concrete difficulties in choosing a field and gaining access trigger a set of actions that force a researcher to review his initial choices and to reposition himself methodologically. Discussing the concept of kairotic time, the authors show the importance of context and timing and demonstrate how stories build around a gravitational point. From there, they discuss how the concept of action nets, breaking linearity, helps to envision research practice not as a sequence, but as networks of actions that produce scientific outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper provides an operational method of using kairotic time and action nets to account for, and acknowledge, the messiness in research narratives.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Truus Poels, Danielle A. Tucker and Joop Kielema

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to understand organisational rhythm as a stimulus for further study into organisational change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to understand organisational rhythm as a stimulus for further study into organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies the experiences of the medical discipline colleges in the Netherlands as they underwent significant reorganisation and transfer of ministerial authority. The data set consists of correspondence, reports and tapes of the meetings over 14 months and interviews with 26 employees.

Findings

This research identified five sub-themes of rhythm (emphasis, intonation, pace, period and repetition). Putting these together, the authors present a framework to understand organisational rhythm during organisational change.

Research limitations/implications

This study begins to develop understanding of how rhythms function but the authors did not compare multiple rhythms in this study.

Practical implications

The authors argue that by unpacking and exploring in more detail the sub-themes of rhythm (emphasis, intonation, pace, period and repetition), the authors can help to explain why complex change management initiatives may stall or fail to gain traction. By understanding the concept of rhythm as movement, the authors can offer recommendations to organisations about how to move forward and overcome challenges associated with progress.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors make an important distinction between rhythm in terms of movement and flow of activity, which has often been overlooked by research, which focusses on the temporal aspects of organisations, which the authors classify as frequency – relating to the sequencing and duration of change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Enrico Maria Piras

The paper reflects on the role of knowledge artefacts in the patient-provider relationship across the organisational boundaries of the clinical setting. Drawing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reflects on the role of knowledge artefacts in the patient-provider relationship across the organisational boundaries of the clinical setting. Drawing on the analysis of the diabetes logbook, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate the role of knowledge artefacts in a fragmented system of knowledge through the study of two distinct practices: “logbook compiling” and “consultation in the surgery”.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework of analysis is rooted in the tradition of practice-based studies which envisions knowledge as the emerging, precarious and socially constructed product of being involved in a practice. The paper follows a designed qualitative research, conducting semi-structured interviews, participant observation and artefact analysis.

Findings

The knowledge artefacts support different and partially irreducible forms of knowledge. Knowing-in-practice is accomplished by means of different activities which contribute to the reshaping of the knowledge artefact itself. The analysis of the “knowledge artefact-in-use” reveals that different actors (doctors and patients) adopt two different perspectives when investigating the chronic condition. Clinicians are interested in a chronological representation of patient data while patients and families are interested in making sense of specific situations, adopting a kairotic perspective (Kairos: the right moment) that emphasises the instant in which something significant for someone happens.

Originality/value

The analysis of the knowledge artefacts-in-use has a twofold outcome. On one hand, it illustrates the mutual shaping of knowing, artefacts and practices. On the other hand, it shows how knowledge artefact can become pivotal resources in a fragmented system of knowledge.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jeff Waistell

This paper aims to examine how metaphors mediate organizational change across space and time.

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2014

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how metaphors mediate organizational change across space and time.

Design/methodology/approach

The data consist of 113 speeches by vice‐chancellors of a distance learning university, recorded in texts. Texts are apposite for this research as they transmit meaning across time and space. Hermeneutics is an appropriate methodology because it enables interpretation across temporal and spatial distance.

Findings

The paper finds that textual metaphors mediate organizational change across space and time in five ways: transferring from familiarity to strangeness, providing coherence, “breaking distance” changing reality through changing language, and recontextualising.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on formal organizational texts and excludes informal texts and conversation. Change outcomes are not studied; there should be further research on how metaphors affect change over time and space.

Practical implications

Metaphors enable managers to communicate change across time and space. Textual metaphors are continuously available and interactive, enabling dialogue between managers and staff across space and time.

Originality/value

The paper furthers our knowledge of how metaphors mediate change across both space and time. Metaphors translate the organization across distance, fusing spatial and temporal horizons, effecting organizational change by changing language. The organization becomes a metaphor of itself, recontextualising across time and space.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Louise Maguire and Susi Geiger

– This study aims to examine how the temporal aspect of service consumption impacts the emotions that are created within consumers during service encounters.

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1651

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how the temporal aspect of service consumption impacts the emotions that are created within consumers during service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted mobile phone or ‘SMS’ diaries to capture the emotions that participants experienced at the very moment they were being felt or ‘in-vivo’. The study included thirteen different services including both ‘brief’ and ‘extended service transactions’.

Findings

The study suggests that the temporal perspective is a dominant cause of consumption emotions in services, influencing consumers’ emotions from before the service encounter commences to its conclusion and, in some cases, beyond the conclusion of the service event. Other antecedents of consumption emotions such as interactions with staff and the servicescape are influenced by and interwoven with this temporal aspect. By capturing emotions as they were experienced, recall difficulties that might have been encountered had the emotions been measured retrospectively were eliminated, allowing the researchers to construct a comprehensive account of the chronology and contiguity of the emotions created within consumers during service encounters.

Originality/value

Although certain aspects of time such as the consequences of queuing and waiting have been addressed in the services marketing literature, a detailed understanding of how time impacts consumption emotions in services from the start to the conclusion of service encounters has not been undertaken to date. This research addresses that gap by examining how the temporal perspective influences not only consumption emotions in customers per se but how it also influences other causes of consumption emotions that customers encounter during service transactions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Jane Davison

Accounting research has mirrored the annual report in its eclecticism. There remain, however, notable gaps in the research profile, including theological perspectives and…

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2658

Abstract

Accounting research has mirrored the annual report in its eclecticism. There remain, however, notable gaps in the research profile, including theological perspectives and the analysis of visual images. The contribution of this present study is twofold: to advance a general philosophical reading of sacred vestiges within financial reporting, and to add to the interpretation of visual images within financial reporting. The examination takes as its primary guide the philosopher and religious historian, Mircea Eliade, and also draws on the work of C.G. Jung. The paper first suggests that archaic traces of a sacred concept of cyclical and repeatable time may be perceived in the periodic preparation of financial statements and associated ritual. It is further contended that the visual space of financial reporting may bear traces of archaic religious attitudes; specific images are analysed and illuminated by religious and cultural associations with ascension.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Anete M. Camille Strand and Tonya L. Henderson

Tonya and Anete are new players at sc’MOI, but this theme emerges at the tail end of sc’MOI so they are best to explicate it. This chapter describes the theoretical…

Abstract

Tonya and Anete are new players at sc’MOI, but this theme emerges at the tail end of sc’MOI so they are best to explicate it. This chapter describes the theoretical contributions of quantum storytelling theory (QST) and practice. Building on the application of complexity theory in the hard sciences as well as social contexts and theory on multimodal constituency, this chapter considers the areas of overlap and difference between quantum storytelling and its theoretical fellows, with special attention given to sociomateriality, storytelling, feminism, fractal, and complexity theory.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Management and Organization Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-552-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Paul F. Donnelly, Yiannis Gabriel and Banu Özkazanç‐Pan

The Guest Editors’ intent with this special issue is to tell tales of the field and beyond, but all with the serious end of rendering visible the largely invisible. This…

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727

Abstract

Purpose

The Guest Editors’ intent with this special issue is to tell tales of the field and beyond, but all with the serious end of rendering visible the largely invisible. This paper aims to introduce the articles forming the special issue, as well as reviewing extant work that foregrounds the hidden stories and uncertainties of doing qualitative research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors advance their arguments through a literature review approach, reflecting on the “state of the field” with regard to doing research and offering new directions on reflexivity as an ethical consideration for conducting qualitative research.

Findings

Far from consigning the mess entailed in doing qualitative research to the margins, there is much to be learned from, and considerable value in, a more thoughtful engagement with the dilemmas we face in the field and beyond, one that shows the worth of what we are highlighting to both enrich research practice itself and contribute to improving the quality of what we produce.

Originality/value

This paper turns the spotlight onto the messiness and storywork aspects of conducting research, which are all too often hidden from view, to promote the kinds of dialogues necessary for scholars to share their fieldwork stories as research, rather than means to a publication end.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ronald E. Purser, Jack Petranker and Barbara Adam

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345

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2011

Raghu Garud, Arun Kumaraswamy and Philipp Tuertscher

We examine how digital technologies enable distributed actors to collaborate asynchronously on virtual projects. We use Wikipedia and associated wiki digital technology as…

Abstract

We examine how digital technologies enable distributed actors to collaborate asynchronously on virtual projects. We use Wikipedia and associated wiki digital technology as the research site for our exploration. Our probe of the emergence of Wikipedia articles highlights a distinctive property of such digital technologies: in their very use, they generate a digital trace. This digital trace serves as a generative memory that facilitates ongoing cocreation, justification, and materialization of contributions from distributed actors. We examine the implications of such processes for virtual projects that embrace digital technologies with properties similar to the wiki technology used in Wikipedia.

Details

Project-Based Organizing and Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-193-0

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