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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap, Kai Yee Lee and Martin Skitmore

Corruption continues to be a pervasive stain on the construction industry in developing countries worldwide, jeopardising project performance and with wide-ranging…

Abstract

Purpose

Corruption continues to be a pervasive stain on the construction industry in developing countries worldwide, jeopardising project performance and with wide-ranging negative implications for all facets of society. As such, this study aims to identify and analyse the causes of corruption in the construction sector of an emerging economy such as Malaysia, as it is crucial to uncover the specific facilitating factors involved to devise effective counter strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a detailed literature review, 18 causes of corruption are identified. The results of an opinion survey within the Malaysian construction industry are further reported to rank and analyse the causes. The factor analysis technique is then applied to uncover the principal factors involved.

Findings

The results indicate that all the considered causes are perceived to be significant, with the most critical causes being avarice, relationships between parties, lack of ethical standards, an intense competitive nature and the involvement of a large amount of money. A factor analysis reveals four major causal dimensions of these causes, comprising the unique nature of the construction industry and the extensive competition involved; unscrupulous leadership, culture and corruption perception; a flawed legal system and lack of accountability; and ineffective enforcement and an inefficient official bureaucracy.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents the Malaysian construction industry’s view of the causes of corruption. Therefore, the arguments made in the study are influenced by the social, economic and cultural settings of Malaysia, which may limit generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

This paper helps stakeholders understand the root causes and underlying dimensions of corruption in the construction industry, especially in Malaysia. Recommendations for changing cultures that may be conducive to corrupt practices, and anti-corruption measures, are suggested based on the findings of the research.

Originality/value

These findings can guide practitioners and researchers in addressing the impediments that give rise to the vulnerability of the construction industry to corrupt practices and understanding the “red flags” in project delivery.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Kai Li, Huynh Van Nguyen, T.C.E. Cheng and Ching-I Teng

As technology-created gamers’ representations, avatars are influential in communication among online gamers. However, there is scant research on how avatars…

Abstract

Purpose

As technology-created gamers’ representations, avatars are influential in communication among online gamers. However, there is scant research on how avatars’ characteristics impact gamers’ friendly behaviour via avatars, i.e., avatar friendliness, and how avatar friendliness is related to online gamer loyalty. The purpose of this paper is to develop a research model grounded in the theory of embodied cognition to examine the impacts of perceived avatar appearance agreeableness, attractiveness and height on avatar friendliness and online gamer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect 1,384 responses from online gamers and use structural equation modelling for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The authors find that perceived avatar appearance agreeableness and attractiveness are positively related to avatar friendliness, while perceived avatar height is negatively related to avatar friendliness. Avatar friendliness, in turn, is positively related to online gamer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study assessed gamers’ perceptions using a cross-sectional design. Future works could use a big data approach to collect behavioural and longitudinal data. Moreover, future works could measure avatar height using pixels.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the e-commerce literature by inventing the new constructs of perceived avatar appearance agreeableness and avatar friendliness, and conducting the first study of using avatar friendliness to explain the impacts of the three avatar characteristics on online gamer loyalty. The findings also provide novel insights for e-commerce managers to effectively build a loyal gamer base.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2018

Chin-Shan Lu, Ho Yee Poon and Hsiang-Kai Weng

This study aims to propose a safety marketing stimuli-response model to explain passengers’ safety behavior in the ferry services context.

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2013

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a safety marketing stimuli-response model to explain passengers’ safety behavior in the ferry services context.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was conducted to examine the impact of safety marketing stimuli on passengers’ safety awareness and behavior by using data obtained from a survey of 316 ferry passengers in Hong Kong.

Findings

The authors found that passengers’ perceptions of ferry safety marketing stimuli positively affected their safety awareness and safety awareness positively affected passengers’ safety behaviors. Specifically, they found that safety awareness played a mediating role in the relationship between ferry safety marketing stimuli and passengers’ safety behaviors.

Practical/implications

The empirically validated scales can be adapted to practices of safety marketing, while providing helpful information for ferry operators to evaluate their efforts of safety marketing and implications for improvement.

Originality/value

According to the authors' knowledge, this study is one of the first attempts to fill this research gap by empirically validating and theoretically conceptualizing measures of safety marketing stimuli based on the marketing stimulus-response model.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Yee Ling Yap, Yong Sheng Edgar Tan, Heang Kuan Joel Tan, Zhen Kai Peh, Xue Yi Low, Wai Yee Yeong, Colin Siang Hui Tan and Augustinus Laude

The design process of a bio-model involves multiple factors including data acquisition technique, material requirement, resolution of the printing technique…

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1041

Abstract

Purpose

The design process of a bio-model involves multiple factors including data acquisition technique, material requirement, resolution of the printing technique, cost-effectiveness of the printing process and end-use requirements. This paper aims to compare and highlight the effects of these design factors on the printing outcome of bio-models.

Design/methodology/approach

Different data sources including engineering drawing, computed tomography (CT), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were converted to a printable data format. Three different bio-models, namely, an ophthalmic model, a retina model and a distal tibia model, were printed using two different techniques, namely, PolyJet and fused deposition modelling. The process flow and 3D printed models were analysed.

Findings

The data acquisition and 3D printing process affect the overall printing resolution. The design process flows using different data sources were established and the bio-models were printed successfully.

Research limitations/implications

Data acquisition techniques contained inherent noise data and resulted in inaccuracies during data conversion.

Originality/value

This work showed that the data acquisition and conversion technique had a significant effect on the quality of the bio-model blueprint and subsequently the printing outcome. In addition, important design factors of bio-models were highlighted such as material requirement and the cost-effectiveness of the printing technique. This paper provides a systematic discussion for future development of an engineering design process in three-dimensional (3D) printed bio-models.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2007

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Wai‐Yee Yeong, Chee‐Kai Chua, Kah‐Fai Leong, Margam Chandrasekaran and Mun‐Wai Lee

This paper presents a new indirect scaffold fabrication method for soft tissue based on rapid prototyping (RP) technique and preliminary characterization for collagen scaffolds.

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2792

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a new indirect scaffold fabrication method for soft tissue based on rapid prototyping (RP) technique and preliminary characterization for collagen scaffolds.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces the processing steps for indirect scaffold fabrication based on the inkjet printing technology. The scaffold morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The designs of the scaffolds are presented and discussed.

Findings

Theoretical studies on the inkjet printing process are presented. Previous research showed that the availability of biomaterial that can be processed on a commercial RP system is very limited. This is due mainly to the unfavorable machine processing parameters such as high working temperature and restrictions on the form of raw material input. The process described in this paper overcomes these problems while retaining the strength of RP techniques. Technical challenges of the process are presented as well.

Research limitations/implications

Harnessing the ability of RP techniques to control the internal morphology of the scaffold, it is possible to couple the design of the scaffold with controlled cell‐culture condition to modulate the behavior of the cells. However, this is just initial work, further development will be needed.

Practical implications

This method enables the designer to manipulate the scaffold at three different length scales, namely the macroscopic scale, intermediate scale and the cellular scale.

Originality/value

The work presented in this paper focuses on important processing steps for indirect scaffold fabrication using thermal‐sensitive natural biomaterial. A mathematical model is proposed to estimate the height of a printed line.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Samuel Kai-Wah Chu, Sandhya Rajagopal and Celina Wing-Yi Lee

A comparative analysis of the results of two longitudinal studies conducted a decade apart, among research post-graduate students, with the purpose of understanding the…

Abstract

A comparative analysis of the results of two longitudinal studies conducted a decade apart, among research post-graduate students, with the purpose of understanding the progress in their information literacy (IL) skills, forms the content of this report. The analysis is based on the application of the Research and Information Search Expertise (RISE) model, which traces students’ progression across four stages of expertise. Such progression was measured across two dimensions of knowledge: that of information sources/databases and that of information search skills. Both studies adopted basic interpretive qualitative methods involving direct observation, interviews, think-aloud protocols, and survey questionnaires, during each of the five interventions, which were spread over a one to one-and-half year period. Scaffolding training was provided at each meeting and data were collected to assess the influence of such training on development of search expertise. A comparison of the findings reveals that students in both studies advance in their IL skills largely in a similar manner. Scaffolding support was found to help both dimensions of knowledge and that lack of one or the other type of knowledge could hinder their ability to find relevant sources for their research. The studies make evident the need for training programs for higher education students, to improve both their knowledge of information sources and their search techniques, tailor-made to closely correlate to their specific information needs. The studies provide insights into student behaviors in the development of IL skills, and the RISE model offers a framework for application to other similar research.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Lawrence Wai‐Chung Lai and Pearl Yik‐Long Chan

This paper uses a probit model to analyse 100 observations in terms of three hypotheses about the formation of owners’ corporations in high‐density private housing estates…

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1360

Abstract

This paper uses a probit model to analyse 100 observations in terms of three hypotheses about the formation of owners’ corporations in high‐density private housing estates in Hong Kong within the context of Mancur Olson’s group theory. The findings do not reject the theory, revealing that it is more likely for an older urban estate with fewer owners to form owners’ corporations. The discussion includes a brief introduction to Olson’s group theory and the development of the probit analysis. Some speculative thoughts about public participation in local level urban management and planning are offered in the conclusion.

Details

Property Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Philip Lawton

The paper aims to explore the extent to which the legal experience of minority shareholder actions in Hong Kong supports the sociological model of the Chinese family firm…

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1028

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the extent to which the legal experience of minority shareholder actions in Hong Kong supports the sociological model of the Chinese family firm as developed by Wong Siu‐lun and reports some preliminary findings for the period 1980‐1995.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon the analysis of 275 minority shareholder petitions in the High Court of Hong Kong between the years 1980 and 1995 inclusive. It also draws upon material from a questionnaire sent to law firms involved in those petitions and interviews with members of the Hong Kong judiciary with experience of hearing minority shareholder cases, members of the legal profession and accounting and company secretarial professions directly or indirectly involved in the administration of companies in Hong Kong and regulators.

Findings

The findings indicate that the problematic early, emergent stage of the model as described by Wong Siu‐lun is quite accurate. Whilst there is considerable support for some aspects of the model of the Chinese family firm, the experience indicates a number of complex dynamics at play, some of which the model does not take into account. However, the findings, at least by implication, do point to the cohesive strength of the Chinese family firm with occasional fault lines resulting in some “disputes” of earthquake proportions which may rumble on in some cases for years.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate the usefulness of lifecycle modeling of the family and other type of corporate firm. It also demonstrates some of the complex subtleties at play. The findings also have implications for the law matters thesis of La Porta et al.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to actually examine the legal experience of minority shareholder protection in a particular jurisdiction (Hong Kong) by examining the petitions and writs actually filed and relating them to a sociological model of the Chinese Family firm.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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