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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Rana Zamin Abbas, Hasan Sohaib Murad, Naveed Yazdani and Ali Asghar

This study seeks to explore the existential meaningfulness of HR managers' work. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of four existential attributes…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the existential meaningfulness of HR managers' work. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of four existential attributes that are death, responsibility, alienation and meaningfulness, on the work of HR managers. The study also asserts that the work of HR managers has an existential dimension to it. It also argues that HR managers have human qualities. They react to human predicament and need emotional identification with their work and organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the responses of HR managers developed on the basis of an interview guide specifically designed for this purpose. The data have been collected through extensive and in-depth field interactions with HR managers working in diverse organizations. The research approach taken here is to focus on the discrete moments of role performance of HR managers that represent microcosms of the larger complexity. Those moments are windows into the multiplicity of factors that are constantly relevant to person-role dynamics. Focusing on specific moments of work role performance of HR managers is like using the zoom lens of a camera: a distant stationary image is brought close and revealed as a series of innumerable leaps of engagement and falls of disengagement.

Findings

The study brings out the emotional and human dilemmas of HR managers working in public and private sector organizations. While discussing and linking Kahn's model with Sartrean thoughts can provide unique perspective within the strategic human resource management especially in Pakistani organizations which was missing not only in Kahn's model but also in management literature.

Originality/value

The study makes a fresh inquiry into the nature of HRM and the existential realities experienced by the HR managers at work place. The study is unique because of its extensive field interactions based on a well-designed interview guide hitherto unapplied in the organization studies.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Chih-Jen Lee and Stanley Y.B. Huang

This study aims to propose a multilevel moderated mediation model of transformational leadership, corporate social responsible, organization-based self-esteem and job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a multilevel moderated mediation model of transformational leadership, corporate social responsible, organization-based self-esteem and job engagement to detect Kahn’s theory and predict new product development performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a longitudinal study over a six-month period to test the multilevel moderated mediation model. Empirical testing used a survey of 1,655 employees from 165 different R&D work group in Great China.

Findings

Transformational leadership, corporate social responsible and organization-based self-esteem well predict employees’ job engagement and new product development performance and are moderated by open discussion of conflict.

Originality/value

This study is the first to propose a multilevel moderated mediation model to detect Kahn’s job engagement theory and predict new product development performance.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Anne Hansen, Zinta Byrne and Christa Kiersch

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational identification as an underlying mechanism for how perceptions of interpersonal leadership are related to employee…

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9132

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational identification as an underlying mechanism for how perceptions of interpersonal leadership are related to employee engagement, and its relationship with commitment and job tension.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 451 full-time employees at an international firm completed a web-based survey.

Findings

Organizational identification mediated the relationship between perceived interpersonal leadership and engagement, which mediated the relationship between perceived interpersonal leadership and commitment. Engagement mediated the relationship between identification and job tension.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include cross-sectional data. Strengths include a large field sample. Implication is that leaders who encourage employees’ identification with the organization may also encourage their engagement.

Practical implications

Interpersonal leadership characteristics can be developed, and are positively related to employees’ identification, commitment, and engagement, which are negatively related to job tension.

Social implications

Interpersonal leaders are positively associated with employees’ engagement; high engagement has been related to positive employee health and well-being. A healthy workforce translates into a healthy society.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few to examine the underlying mechanisms through which leadership relates to engagement.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2018

Manjiri Kunte and Parisa Rungruang

Studies suggest that engagement is related with organizationally desired outcomes, including performance, productivity, profitability, employee retention, organization…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies suggest that engagement is related with organizationally desired outcomes, including performance, productivity, profitability, employee retention, organization citizenship behavior and employee well-being. Despite its practical relevance in the workplace, the concept of engagement has been theoretically dispersed. Therefore, this study aims to present a conceptual review of engagement studies leading to the development of a nomological framework and an evolution timeline for the concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is divided into three sections. The first section elicits the nomological framework based on the comparison between engagement, its predecessors and its contemporary concepts such as motivation theories, job design theories, burnout theories and positive psychology. A review of related theories and concepts highlights the similarities and differences vis-a-vis engagement. In the second section, the study depicts the evolution of the engagement concept based on the nomological framework. The evolution is discussed through the decades of before 1990, 1990-2000, 2000-2010 and 2010 onwards. To consolidate the theories and concepts, the authors covered studies that defined engagement as role engagement, personal engagement, work engagement and employee engagement. The third section presents the future research directions based on the framework and evolution.

Findings

The literature review reveals future research directions. These include the addition of new antecedents and theoretical frameworks to enrich the explanatory power and practical relevance of the antecedents of engagement, exploring the context of work with qualitative and mixed method designs, exploring the unit of “role” in engagement studies and the need for more replication studies in this field.

Originality/value

The key contributions of this paper are the nomological framework and the timeline of the evolution of engagement concept.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Muhammad Zia Aslam, Safiah Omar, Mohammad Nazri, Hasnun Anip Bustaman and Mohammed Mustafa Mohammed Yousif

Though employee job engagement has been one of the few most proliferated organizational concepts during the last two decades, evidence on how to achieve an engaged…

Abstract

Purpose

Though employee job engagement has been one of the few most proliferated organizational concepts during the last two decades, evidence on how to achieve an engaged workforce is unclear. The purpose of this study was to contribute to the engagement literature by investigating the role of interpersonal leadership in developing job engagement through the relative importance of deep acting emotional labor skills, initiative climate and learning goal orientation as intervening mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed an online self-reported survey in data collection, gathering input from 438 frontline service employees in Malaysia. The data was then tested using the structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to evaluate the proposed parallel mediation model of the study.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that deep acting emotional labor skills, initiative climate and learning goal orientation were significantly effective in intervening mechanisms through which interpersonal leadership impacted job engagement.

Practical implications

This study offers insightful evidence that can be utilized by service organizations to improve employees' job engagement. The evidence derived from this study suggests that interpersonal leadership is a valuable organizational resource that can help carve pathways through which the objective of employee job engagement can be achieved. Therefore, while crafting organizational interventions for employee job engagement, service managers should address the findings of this study.

Originality/value

Despite the evidence presented in previous literature on the notable relationship between leadership and engagement, there is yet to be an apt understanding of the impact of new leadership perspectives and the intervening mechanisms in predicting job engagement. This study attempts to fill the research gap.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Hannes Zacher and Cort W. Rudolph

As the workforce is aging and becoming increasingly age diverse, successful aging at work has been proclaimed to be a desirable process and outcome, as well as a…

Abstract

As the workforce is aging and becoming increasingly age diverse, successful aging at work has been proclaimed to be a desirable process and outcome, as well as a responsibility of both workers and their organizations. In this chapter, we first review, compare, and critique theoretical frameworks of successful aging developed in the gerontology and lifespan developmental literatures, including activity, disengagement, and continuity theories; Rowe and Kahn’s model; the resource approach; the model of selective optimization with compensation; the model of assimilative and accommodative coping; the motivational theory of lifespan development; socioemotional selectivity theory; and the strength and vulnerability integration model. Subsequently, we review and critically compare three conceptualizations of successful aging at work developed in the organizational literature. We conclude the chapter by outlining implications for future research on successful aging at work.

Details

Age Diversity in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-073-0

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Shuaib Ahmed Soomro and Muhammad Kamran

Drawing on Kahn’s model of meaningful connections, this study aims to examine relational attachment as a mediating mechanism linking social support in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on Kahn’s model of meaningful connections, this study aims to examine relational attachment as a mediating mechanism linking social support in terms of instrumental support and personal support to employees’ subjective career success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in 2 waves from 247 employees working in Poland. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling in AMOS.

Findings

The findings indicated that employees are more attached to and satisfied with their careers when they have a stronger relational attachment to others at work. Furthermore, relational attachment was found to be driven by tangible or intangible instrumental support received at work rather than the personal support received at work.

Practical implications

Managers should recognize the importance of workplace relationships and social support, which can lead to higher career commitment and career satisfaction. However, managers should keep in mind that too much interference in individuals’ privacy and providing too much personal support may lead to adverse outcomes.

Originality/value

The present study expands the scant literature on the mediating role of relational attachment at work between social support received at work and subjective career success.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Ameer A. Basit

The purpose of this paper is to advance research on the newly developed construct of respectful engagement (RE) (Carmeli et al., 2015), which focuses on positive…

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1591

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance research on the newly developed construct of respectful engagement (RE) (Carmeli et al., 2015), which focuses on positive interrelating behaviors characterized by respect in the organizational context. Further, this study aims to examine whether RE was associated with task performance and affective organizational commitment, and whether employee job engagement mediated these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the self-reported measures and online survey method, data were collected from 185 employees working in one of the world’s largest hosiery firms located in the eastern part of Punjab, Pakistan. Structural equation modeling and multiple regressions were used to test the proposed conceptual model.

Findings

RE had significant positive effects on task performance and affective commitment. The effect of RE on affective commitment was stronger than it was on task performance. Moreover, job engagement significantly mediated the effects of RE on task performance and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides empirical evidence that RE enhances job engagement of employees by improving their levels of effort, enthusiasm and pride and concentration in work roles. Consequently, the enhanced level of job engagement leads employees to demonstrate better task performance and increased affective commitment with the organization.

Practical implications

Managers can institutionalize RE by applying strategies suggested by (Dutton, 2003) that focus on conveying presence, being genuine, communicating affirmation, effective listening and supportive communication. Training programs around these strategies can help managers to achieve this goal. Furthermore, in their day-to-day performance discussions, managers should follow the above strategies that could open further avenues for RE at the workplace. Managers can also allocate some weight to employees’ RE as part of their performance appraisals. The use of rewards would encourage employees to adopt RE as a norm desired by the organization.

Originality/value

This study extends research on the new developed construct of RE by focusing on task performance and affective commitment as its key outcomes. Furthermore, this study is the first to introduce job engagement as mediator in the relationship of RE with task performance and affective commitment. Another important aspect of this study is that its model has been tested on the data collected from Pakistan, which is an underrepresented geographical region in the management literature.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Simon L Albrecht, Arnold B Bakker, Jamie A Gruman, William H Macey and Alan M Saks

The purpose of this paper is to argue in support of a model that shows how four key HRM practices focused on engagement influence organizational climate, job demands and…

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35071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue in support of a model that shows how four key HRM practices focused on engagement influence organizational climate, job demands and job resources, the psychological experiences of safety, meaningfulness and availability at work, employee engagement, and individual, group and organizational performance and competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual review focuses on the research evidence showing interrelationships between organizational context factors, job factors, individual employee psychological and motivational factors, employee outcomes, organizational outcomes and competitive advantage. The proposed model integrates frameworks that have previously run independently in the HR and engagement literatures.

Findings

The authors conclude that HRM practitioners need to move beyond the routine administration of annual engagement surveys and need to embed engagement in HRM policies and practices such personnel selection, socialization, performance management, and training and development.

Practical implications

The authors offer organizations clear guidelines for how HR practices (i.e. selection, socialization, performance management, training) can be used to facilitate and improve employee engagement and result in positive outcomes that will help organizations achieve a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The authors provide useful new insights for researchers and management professionals wishing to embed engagement within the fabric of HRM policies and practices and employee behaviour, and organizational outcomes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Mary Welch

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to corporate communication theory by considering the evolution of employee engagement and the role of communication in…

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29346

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to corporate communication theory by considering the evolution of employee engagement and the role of communication in enhancing employee engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Despite its importance for organisation leaders, there is considerable confusion about the meaning of employee engagement. This paper aims to provide a degree of clarity on the concept by identifying stages in its evolution and discussing its definition.

Findings

Surprisingly, corporate communication literature has not yet adequately considered the concept. This may be due to confusion concerning the concept, and to concerns about overlaps with other constructs such as commitment. This paper tackles the gap in the literature with a proposed model of the role of internal corporate communication in enhancing employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The article discusses linkages between engagement and communication which suggest research potential for the communication disciplines.

Practical implications

There are practical implications of the model proposed here since it encourages communicators to consider potential engagement effects of communication strategies and tactics.

Social implications

The paper encourages communicators to consider the communication needs of employees.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper provides an overview of employee engagement literature with a novel contribution identifying evolutionary waves in the development of the concept. It suggests a definition of organisation engagement as a dynamic, changeable psychological state which links employees to their organisations, manifest in organisation member role performances expressed physically, cognitively and emotionally, and influenced by organisation‐level internal communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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