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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges to data sharing among construction stakeholders in the South African construction industry and also assess…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges to data sharing among construction stakeholders in the South African construction industry and also assess stakeholders’ perceptions of the benefits of data sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a cross-sectional survey administered via a Web-based online survey on construction professionals registered with the South African Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions (SACPCMP). The respondents rated on a five-point Likert scale the level of influence of the challenges of, and the benefits derivable from data sharing. These were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques.

Findings

The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) presented a five-factor structure of the challenges to data sharing, including reporting context/framework/lack of expertise, cost considerations/clients’ influences, data interoperability, stakeholders conservative attitude and personal interest/data confidentiality. These have percentage variances 17.124%, 16.929%, 13.786%, 13.353% and 12.961%, respectively. For the benefits of data sharing, the constructs were categorized into four themes, namely, optimal project decisions/stakeholders’ confidence, benchmarking/ collaboration among firms, time and cost benefits and enhanced market intelligence. These have respective variances of 24.598%, 18.393%, 16.160% and 14.685%.

Practical implications

It is expected that this study will provide information to stakeholders towards implementation policies and practices that could eliminate the challenges to data sharing and assemblage, thereby enhancing the level of data sharing in the construction industry.

Originality/value

Given the increasing global and technological changes, it might be expected that there will be an increased appeal by construction stakeholders towards embracing data sharing and assemblage owing to the inherent benefits and value.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Thendo Masia, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Akintayo Opawole

Green building is a relatively new concept with limited applications in property development in South Africa. The objectives of this study are therefore threefold…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building is a relatively new concept with limited applications in property development in South Africa. The objectives of this study are therefore threefold: identify key green building principles considered by property developers, establish the benefits of implementing the principles and determine the barriers to its applications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study of two Green Star South Africa (SA)-certified buildings in Sandton, Johannesburg. These are Alexander Forbes building, and Ernst & Young Eris Towers. The two certified buildings were purposefully selected because of the insightful information they provide regarding application of green building principles. The main themes investigated in the cases are environmental awareness, green building principles applications, as well as benefits and barriers of green building. A total of six interviewees from the contractors', property developers', environmental/green building consultants' and sustainability consultants' organizations who were involved in the implementation of green building principles in the two cases provided the qualitative data for the study. The qualitative data were supplemented with data relating to the two case studies obtained from the ‘Earth Works for a Sustainable Built Environment’. The interviews were arranged over a period of two months, and each interview took between 20 and 30 minutes. Analysis of the data was done through a phenomenological interpretation of the qualitative opinions expressed by the interviewees.

Findings

Key green building principles comprising energy efficiency, water efficiency, resource efficiency, occupants' health and well-being and sustainable site development were implemented in the two cases. The fact that the buildings were rated 4-star enabled inference to be drawn that the implementation of the principles was less than 60 per cent. Energy efficiency of 35 per cent indicated in Case I suggests that the level is consistent with the South African green building standard of 25 per cent to 50 per cent. However, the energy and water efficiency assessment of the building were based on projections rather than on ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the buildings' performance. Moreover, perceived saving in operational cost was identified as dominant driver to green building principles implementation. Conversely, lack of government incentives and absence of reliable benchmarking data regarding performance of green buildings were major barriers to its full implementation.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide important implications to the developers and government on the application of green building principles. In the first place, the evidence that initial high cost premium could be off settled by long- term saving on operational costs as a result of use of local materials, energy and water savings as well as use of recycled material, as implemented in the two case projects, would improve investment decision in green building by developers. The understanding of the drivers and barriers to implementation of green building principles also has implications for guiding government policies and programmes towards green building.

Originality/value

The significance of this study stems from the fact that limited studies, especially in the South African context, have indicated the drivers and barriers to the implementation of green building principles. The case study approach adopted gave a novelty to the study by providing hands-on information from the stakeholders who were known to have played specific roles in the application of green building. The findings indicated that initial high cost premium was not a consideration in developers' choice of green building which justifies the possibility of a costlier product when factors such as environmental sustainability benefit is considered to be ultimate. The study thus suggests further research involving larger cases on energy efficiency, water efficiency and costs of green buildings compared to the conventional type to bring the findings to a broader perspective and assist to benchmark data for green building assessment.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Liané van Wyk, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Akintayo Opawole

The South African construction industry appears to be lagging behind other industries in the country in terms of implementation and adoption of innovative technologies…

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Abstract

Purpose

The South African construction industry appears to be lagging behind other industries in the country in terms of implementation and adoption of innovative technologies. Moreover, sufficient empirical data on the adoption of innovative technologies, especially, in developing countries are not readily available. The aim of this study is therefore to assess the adoption and implementation of innovative technologies in the South African construction industry with a view to improving the industry's performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was undertaken using a questionnaire, administered to construction professionals primarily in project management, quantity surveying and architectural firms.

Findings

The key findings show that there are some innovative technologies such as building information modelling, 3-dimensional mapping, drones, 3-dimensional printing and virtual reality that have been deployed. However, limited adoption of innovative technologies within the industry and low levels of knowledge of its benefits among the respondents were reported. This low implementation of innovative technologies was due to critical barriers such as high cost, limited knowledge, time requirement, fear of change, lack of interest, nature of construction processes and lack of team dynamics. Key drivers of innovation were found to include globalization and competition.

Practical implications

The current level of implementation of innovative technologies indicated that they are not yet optimized in the South African construction industry and suggests implications for change, adaptation and growth. The study recommends that firms should consider investing in research and development in order to exploit the potential of innovation for organizations and the industry at large.

Originality/value

The drivers and barriers indicated will help to prioritize the direction of adoption and growth which could help to improve the industry.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Benjamin Gbolahan Ekemode and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

This study investigates the impact of mentoring on real estate students' entrepreneurial intentions with a focus on Nigeria, an emerging African economy. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the impact of mentoring on real estate students' entrepreneurial intentions with a focus on Nigeria, an emerging African economy. Specifically, the study assessed the influence of mentoring on the entrepreneurial intentions and career preferences of real estate students and analysed the influence of having a real estate mentor on the respondents' perception of the motivators and inhibitors to their entrepreneurial intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a descriptive research approach using closed-ended questionnaires. The study population comprise final year real estate students selected from three federal universities offering Real Estate in southwest Nigeria. Total enumeration was adopted for the study. From a total population of 231 students, a response rate of 69.26%, representing 160 questionnaire were retrieved and found suitable for the analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistical techniques were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The result shows that the factor structure of the motivators for students who have real estate mentors clustered into four constructs; in order of influence are personal fulfilment/satisfaction, flexibility/financial motives, mentoring/economic influences and personal preferences/prestige and status. Meanwhile, economic/independence, personal preference/fulfilment, financial motives/self-perception and mentoring were the factor clusters influencing intention for real estate enterprise by students who have no real estate mentor. Predominant debacles across both categories of respondents relate to the lack of support and market uncertainty.

Practical implications

There is a growing body of knowledge exploring the linkages between mentoring and the development of entrepreneurial intentions. However, scant empirical investigations have examined the impact of mentoring on real estate students, especially from the perspectives of emerging markets which are usually characterised by low economic opportunities and where issues of graduate unemployment appear endemic and yet to be appropriately resolved.

Originality/value

This study explores the implications of mentoring on the entrepreneurial intentions of real estate students' from the perspective of an emerging market.

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu, Job Taiwo Gbadegesin, Theophilus Olugbenga Babatunde and Cyril Ayodele Ajayi

Coworking space had been a trajectory in the commercial space operation and management globally. Commercial coworking/tenancy space is confronted with an unexpected shift…

Abstract

Purpose

Coworking space had been a trajectory in the commercial space operation and management globally. Commercial coworking/tenancy space is confronted with an unexpected shift. This paper aims to examine the peculiarity and investment characteristics of flexible office space and the post-COVID implications on coworking office space practice and investment. This is with a view toward providing investors with an understanding of the dynamics underpinning flexible office space investment in the Nigerian emerging property market.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative research approach. Open-ended interview questions were used to solicit information from nine coworking space operators in the urban property market of Ibadan, Nigeria. The structured interview data were analyzed using Atlas.ti – a computer-aided qualitative data analysis software.

Findings

The findings show that the factors influencing demand for flexible office space in the study area include flexibility, affordability, cost-effectiveness, entrepreneurship motivations and opportunity for risk sharing. The results also revealed that coworkers are predominantly mobile individuals who require a workstation away from their homes or a traditional office setup. Management challenges include deficient infrastructure, low level of awareness, stealing and high cost of operations. The impact of COVID-19 includes a drop in patronage, rent refunds, changes in working pattern and job loss, restriction to online and remote operation, the extra cost of putting prevention measures in place, changes in tenancy contract and drops in return on investment.

Practical implications

This study has implications for investors in commercial space occupation and leases in comparable developing economies.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper lies in its relevance with the emergent behavioral changes, orchestrated from the novel COVID-19, which compels reevaluation of workplace practices and investment for economic improvement, especially as it relates to commercial real estate investment.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Christopher Amoah, Tanya Van Schalkwyk and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

South Africa has a large social housing scheme to provide primary housing for less privileged citizens who obtain an average monthly income of less than R 3,500.00. The…

Abstract

Purpose

South Africa has a large social housing scheme to provide primary housing for less privileged citizens who obtain an average monthly income of less than R 3,500.00. The government seeks to promote an integrated society by developing sustainable human settlements and quality housing within a subsidy system for different income groups. This study aims to examine whether quality management is applied to the reconstruction and development programme (RDP) housing programme during construction.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey approach was selected for this study. This involved using a close-ended questionnaire to collect data amongst 1,893 households who are currently residing in government housing units in the city of Bloemfontein, in the Free State province. The questionnaires were self-administered amongst randomly selected respondents based on their availability at the time of the visit to the above area. However, only the occupants of a household were included in the study. The data gathered were analysed by making use of R-programming software.

Findings

The findings revealed that a low level of quality is evident in the already constructed RDP housing units. Most of the inspected units were built with low-quality building materials or were not well-constructed, with derelict structural frames and finishes being evident in most houses. Respondents also indicated that they were not satisfied with the quality of some aspects of the units, such as the plaster and paint finishes, door frames built into walls and uneven floors and floor finishes. These complaints indicate that little to no quality management was applied at the time of construction or even afterwards during the latent defects period.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was limited to responses amongst randomly selected government RDP housing occupants in seven communities in Bloemfontein’s periphery, in the Free State Province of South Africa.

Practical implications

The empirical results from the findings indicate that the South African Government should ensure that quality management is applied during the housing units’ construction. This may mean that a new strategy for verifying the units’ quality will need to be developed, considering the respondents’ concerns by improving the quality of the construction materials and methods used to erect these units. The government should also consider improving contractors’ tender selection criteria to ensure higher quality construction methods, materials and management.

Originality/value

The study has identified quality challenges in constructing the social housing and stated recommendations that will address the identified issues if implemented by the programme implementers. This will help achieve the programme's objective, which is to improve the living conditions of previously disadvantaged individuals through social housing scheme.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Oyeronke Toyin Ogunbayo, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Theophilus Babatunde

Coworking spaces are recent developments in commercial property investment portfolio in Nigeria. Given the user-centered nature of coworking space practices, the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Coworking spaces are recent developments in commercial property investment portfolio in Nigeria. Given the user-centered nature of coworking space practices, the purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing users’ preference for coworking, and the challenges associated with the use of coworking spaces in the emerging Nigeria property market.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative research approach. This study sampled nine (9) traditional coworking spaces in Ibadan property market, from which 15 coworking space users were randomly selected in each of the coworking hubs. From a total of 135 respondents, only 45 (33.33%) questionnaires were retrieved and found suitable for analysis. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

The results showed that economic and social motivators were significant drivers influencing coworkers’ decision to cowork. Personal factors were the least rated. Also, top-rated features/facilities that users prefer in the workstations include a neat environment and conveniences, uninterrupted power supply, serenity of the neighborhood and ease of signing up. The findings also showed that the challenges being faced by the users were predominantly about disturbance/noise from guests and/or other users, lack of privacy, poor internet connectivity, power failure and inability to personalize workspace (in decreasing order).

Practical implications

This study has implications for investors and users of coworking spaces in comparable developing markets. Also, the study will influence strategies and decisions of private firms/companies, as it relates to the work pattern of their employees.

Originality/value

This paper is relevant given the emergent behavioral changes, necessitated by the changing work practices. This compels the need for a reevaluation of the preferences and challenges associated with coworking spaces, especially as it relates to the users of flexible office spaces in emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Oluseyi Joshua Adegoke, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Olaitan Olaoye

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the soft skill gap of graduate employees, as well as the factors influencing the skill gaps of real estate graduates in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the soft skill gap of graduate employees, as well as the factors influencing the skill gaps of real estate graduates in the employment of real estate firms in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were employed for the study. Close-ended questionnaire served on real estate employers in the two major property markets of Nigeria: Lagos and Abuja. From a total of 343 questionnaires administered, 172 (59.7%) questionnaires were retrieved. While data from the graduate employees were obtained via a web-based survey sent out to a total of 558 graduates, 119 (21.33%) responses were received. Descriptive and inferential statistical techniques were employed in the data analysis.

Findings

The findings showed that employers had high expectations for soft skillsets relating to responsibility, administrative, listening and communication skills. These have respective mean scores of 6.38, 6.33, 6.31 and 6.31 on a seven point scale. However, the results revealed significant skill gaps with skills such as logical thinking, business negotiation, responsibility and marketing. Further, the analysis revealed that factors influencing the skill gap, in decreasing order of influence, are training/professional mentors/remuneration, personal preferences/industry characteristics and curriculum/faculties.

Practical implications

Real estate graduate soft skills are investigated to uncover areas of emphasis and skill gaps. These outcomes could serve as important feedbacks for stakeholders towards improving real estate teaching and curriculum. The findings could also assist real estate graduates to know employers areas of emphasis in relation to graduate employability skills.

Originality/value

Extant studies have reiterated and evaluated the soft skills gaps based on the perceptions of employers, faculties and institutions of higher learning. However, there is the need to investigate the perception of graduate employees, being the recipient and major stakeholders in the training process.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele, Timothy Tunde Oladokun and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

The global shift in the traditional skills required of real estate graduates has led to an increased demand for employees who have the required skills and competencies…

Abstract

Purpose

The global shift in the traditional skills required of real estate graduates has led to an increased demand for employees who have the required skills and competencies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate employment considerations of real estate firms and analyse employers’ skill expectations and the observed skills possessed by the graduate employees. This study also analysed the self-assessed soft skill levels of the graduate employees, thereby establishing the skill gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were sought from real estate employers in the two dominant real estate markets of Nigeria: Lagos and Abuja, and real estate graduate employees who have had a minimum of six months working experience in real estate firms. Data collected were analysed using statistical techniques such as frequency, percentages, mean, correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, paired-samples t-test and independent samples t-test.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that employers’ soft skills expectations were high with skills such as responsibility, administrative, listening, communication, business negotiation and work ethics. Based on employers' observed skills, there were significant skill gaps with respect to soft skills such as responsibility, business negotiation, logical thinking, marketing and dispute resolution. An analysis of the core skills reveals employers' preference for technical competencies in valuation, agency, property management, marketing, report writing and landlord and tenant laws. However, graduate employees possessed significant skill gaps with regards to technical skills such as valuation, property investment analysis, feasibility and viability appraisal, market research methods and facility management.

Practical implications

An understanding of the skill gaps will provide useful feedback to professional bodies, regulatory boards, institutions of higher learning, faculty members and other stakeholders regarding deficient skill areas, especially for curriculum review, development and training in the real estate sector.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of information about employers' skill preferences and the skill gaps in the real estate sector.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Akintayo Opawole, Solomon Olusola Babatunde, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Oluwatumininu A. Ateji

Life cycle costing (LCC) has become increasingly important in construction projects over the last decades. However, limited empirical studies have been carried out on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Life cycle costing (LCC) has become increasingly important in construction projects over the last decades. However, limited empirical studies have been carried out on the factors influencing its application in building projects, particularly in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to address this gap in knowledge within the Nigerian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were used through the administration of questionnaires to practising quantity surveying firms in Lagos State, Nigeria. The data obtained were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistical tools including percentages, mean item score and factor analysis.

Findings

The study identified 47 barriers to the application of LCC, and the analysis of the ranking revealed that 35 (of 47) identified barriers were considered important. Factor analysis grouped the identified barriers into four key factors namely, professional incompetence; cost implications; administrative factor and procurement options.

Practical implications

This research is important by providing the empirical evidence on the barriers to the application of LCC in developing countries, particularly in Nigeria. For instance, the identification of important barriers to LCC use will enlighten the construction professionals to be trained in the practicalities of LCC. Moreover, the study provides implications for construction stakeholders (including governments) to draw policy recommendations that will positively improve the use of LCC in the construction industry, especially in developing countries.

Originality/value

The study will be beneficial to all the construction stakeholders by broadening their awareness about the barriers to LCC use in Nigeria and developing countries at large.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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