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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Julie Ferguson

– This paper aims to analyze how the debate around knowledge management for development has evolved over a 14-year period.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze how the debate around knowledge management for development has evolved over a 14-year period.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in an inductive manner, seeking to identify key themes discussed on an online community on knowledge management for development. Analysis comprised observation of the online debate, as well as semantic (co-word) network analysis of a " big data " set, consisting of 14 years of email exchange. The results were verified with the members of the community in a focus group manner.

Findings

In terms of content, the knowledge management for development debate remains strongly engaged with actual development discourse, and it continues to be rather oriented toward tools and methods. In terms of learning, the community appears highly inclusive, and provides fertile ground for in-depth knowledge sharing, but shows less potential for innovative influences.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to literature on knowledge management in the non-profit sector by showing how heterogeneous communities in the development domain generate knowledge and shape discourse. More specifically, the paper contributes to knowledge management for development literature by providing a comprehensive overview of how the domain has evolved since its emergence. It also advances knowledge management by showing how inclusive networks can contribute to but also limit learning.

Practical/implications

The study is of use to knowledge management professionals by showing not only the benefits but also the limitations of inclusive knowledge-sharing networks.

Social/implications

The study provides important societal implications by showing which topics are most important to development practitioners, covering the period encompassed by the Millennium Goals.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to provide a comprehensive historical overview of the key topics on knowledge management for development, as engaged by the primary online community on this topic. It also introduces innovative methods for inductive analysis of big data.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Sherine Ghoneim and Cheryl Brown

As the knowledge management and research communications arm of the Global Development Network, GDNet builds the capacity of researchers from developing and transition…

Abstract

As the knowledge management and research communications arm of the Global Development Network, GDNet builds the capacity of researchers from developing and transition countries to inform global development research and policy. In its early years, GDNet focused on information and knowledge management staff in developing country research institutes, recognising the importance of this group in moving locally generated research into policy. From 2005 onwards, GDNet piloted a series of knowledge management workshops in Africa, and in 2007, organised a two‐day conference in Cairo, in partnership with the ACBF and the World Bank Institute, to share and examine its findings with others. Called “Knowledge Management as an Enabler of Change and Innovation in Africa”, the conference brought together the experiences and lessons learned from efforts to build knowledge management capacity from across the African continent. In 2007, the discussion centered on two key themes: the need to create an enabling environment for the adoption of knowledge management practices in Africa and the importance of indigenous knowledge assets as inputs to poverty alleviation strategies. In exploring these themes, speakers highlighted several key challenges in “efforts towards building effective communication strategies and building a ‘knowledge friendly culture’ in the continent” (GDN, 2007). The 20th anniversary of ACBF is a timely opportunity to revisit the discussions of 2007, to question progress made towards meeting these challenges and share with delegates how GDNet’s capacity building activities have evolved in the light of the conference findings.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Åsa Corneliusson

Departing from an online interactive Gender Café on the topic of Knowledge Management (KM), jointly hosted by a UN agency and the Society of Gender Professionals, this…

Abstract

Departing from an online interactive Gender Café on the topic of Knowledge Management (KM), jointly hosted by a UN agency and the Society of Gender Professionals, this chapter seeks to provide gender practitioners and others with practical examples of how to “gender” KM in international development. Through analyzing the travel of feminist ideas into the field of KM with inspiration from Barbara Czarniawska’s and Bernard Joerge’s (1996) theory of the travel of ideas, the chapter explores the spaces, limits, and future possibilities for the inclusion of feminist perspectives. The ideas and practical examples of how to do so provided in this chapter originated during the café, by the participants and panellists. The online Gender Café temporarily created a space for feminist perspectives. The data demonstrate how feminist perspectives were translated into issues of inclusion, the body, listening methodologies, practicing reflection, and the importance to one’s work of scrutinizing underlying values. However, for the feminist perspective to be given continuous space and material sustainability developing into an acknowledged part of KM, further actions are needed. The chapter also reflects on future assemblies of gender practitioners, gender scholars and activists, recognizing the struggles often faced by them. The chapter discusses strategies of how a collective organizing of “outside–inside” gender practitioners might push the internal work of implementing feminist perspectives forward.

Details

Gender and Practice: Knowledge, Policy, Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-388-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Patrick Lambe

This paper aims to argue that the current malaise and fragmentation within knowledge management are at least partially caused by a lack of awareness of its own historical roots.

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7977

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that the current malaise and fragmentation within knowledge management are at least partially caused by a lack of awareness of its own historical roots.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review shows that very explicit knowledge management concepts and practices were in circulation 50 years ago and that current knowledge management literature has very little historical depth.

Findings

The current canonical knowledge management literature almost universally ignores significant antecedents to knowledge management thinking and practice dating back to the 1960s.

Practical implications

There are three practical implications: for knowledge management education to recover its historical antecedents; for KM theorists and practitioners to connect KM theory and practice to historically‐related work in economics, sociology and information management, from which it is currently isolated; through an understanding of its roots to help knowledge management theorists build a meaningful and coherent agenda for the discipline.

Originality/value

This is the most extensive exploration to date of the historical origins of knowledge management, with significant implications for recovering a productive agenda for the discipline.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Sylvain K. Cibangu, Mark Hepworth and Donna Champion

This paper relayed an important line of Mark Hepworth’s work, which engages with information technologies and development. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a…

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1137

Abstract

Purpose

This paper relayed an important line of Mark Hepworth’s work, which engages with information technologies and development. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a subfield of library and information science (LIS) for development to reclaim the role of information services and systems for social change in rural areas. The paper looked at the extent of development gained with the advent of mobile phones.

Design/methodology/approach

Rather than undertaking traditional large-scale, quantitative, context-independent and survey-type research, the paper employed capability approach and semi-structured interviews to ascertain the experiences that mobile phone kiosk vendors in the rural Congo had of mobile phones.

Findings

It was found that mobile phones should be geared towards the liberation, and not utilization or commodification of humans and their needs and that mobile phones were not a catalyst of human basic capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Since the method employed is an in-depth qualitative analysis of mobile phone kiosk vendors, obtained results can be used to enrich or inform mobile phone experiences in other settings and groups.

Practical implications

This paper provided empirical evidence as to how an important group of mobile phone users could harness development with their mobiles.

Originality/value

Most LIS literature has presented mobile phones along the lines of information freedom or access, mass subscription, adoption rates, technological and entrepreneurial innovation, micro-credits, etc. However, the paper placed the topic development at the heart of LIS debates.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Monica Samuel Chipungahelo

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge sharing on traditional vegetables for supporting food security among farmers and other communities in Kilosa district, Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was employed. Semi-structured questionnaires with both open- and closed-ended questions were used to collect quantitative data in three wards of Kilosa District in Tanzania. Interviews were used to collect qualitative data from three heads of farmer groups, and direct observation was used to validate findings obtained from questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed that farmers used a socialisation approach to share indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables on production, consumption and preservation.

Research limitations/implications

The study necessitates a need to conduct regular studies on sharing knowledge of traditional vegetables among different communities for supporting food security.

Practical implications

The paper provides a framework for agricultural development planners on how to improve the management of indigenous knowledge on traditional vegetables with scientific knowledge in local communities for improving food security in Tanzania.

Social implications

The paper has an implication for improving knowledge-sharing strategies on traditional vegetables in supporting food security in Tanzania, and other parts of Africa and developed countries. There is a need for knowledge intermediaries to develop knowledge database on production, consumption and preservation of traditional vegetable to increase the dissemination of this knowledge and, hence, improve nutrition and food security.

Originality/value

The paper provides appropriate knowledge-sharing strategies which are needed to improve sharing of indigenous knowledge about traditional vegetables in Tanzania and other developed and developing countries.

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Abdoulaye Kaba and Chennupati K. Ramaiah

The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyze demographic differences in using knowledge creation tools among faculty members. It also attempts to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyze demographic differences in using knowledge creation tools among faculty members. It also attempts to identify the most knowledge creation tool used by the participants. The tools comprised of 13 items including data mining, metadata, classifications, expert profiling, Mashup and blogs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through an online survey questionnaire. A total of 300 faculty members from 26 universities and colleges accredited by the UAE Ministry of High Education participated in the study. The t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test are used to validate the stated hypotheses.

Findings

The study found personal knowledge management to be the most used knowledge creation tool among the faculty members, followed by authoring tools and templates. Findings of the study indicate statistically no significant difference in using knowledge creation tools with respect to gender, qualification, academic rank, teaching experience and institutional affiliation. These findings support the stated null hypotheses (H1, H3, H4, H6 and H8) and suggest that the use of knowledge creation tools is independent from these variables. However, the results showed statistically a significant age group difference, academic specialization and research experience in using knowledge creation tools. The findings reject the assumed hypotheses (H2, H5 and H7) and suggest the impact of these variables on the use of knowledge creation tools.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on the data collected through a survey questionnaire. Future studies may combine quantitative and qualitative data collection methods for the purpose of comparison and in-depth analysis.

Practical implications

Findings could be an important reference for knowledge management officers and knowledge intensive organizations and institutions to develop knowledge creation tools and promote usage among knowledge workers.

Originality/value

The paper represents one of the very few empirical studies conducted on the use of knowledge creation tools. Findings of the study may contribute to the process of knowledge creation among faculty members and also to the improvement of knowledge management in the academic environment and other knowledge organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Stella Ngozi I. Anasi, Imo J. Akpan and Titilayo Adedokun

This study aims to investigate the degree and frequency of utilisation of information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled platforms for knowledge-sharing by…

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1208

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the degree and frequency of utilisation of information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled platforms for knowledge-sharing by academic librarians in south-west Nigeria. It also seeks to identify possible barriers as well as strategies that will promote efficient utilisation of these platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a descriptive survey design, using a researcher-developed questionnaire for data collection. Fifty-two professional librarians from selected academic libraries in south-west Nigeria were surveyed. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis.

Findings

Finding from the investigation revealed that academic librarians in south-west Nigeria are increasingly utilising ICT platforms for knowledge-sharing in preference to the traditional platforms. However, ignorance of existing ICT knowledge-sharing platforms, limited ICT skills and an unhealthy technology environment remain major challenges.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have far-reaching implications for Nigerian academic librarians’ professional development. It advocates maximum utilisation of ICT platforms to enhance knowledge-sharing and collaboration for professional development, scholarly communication and efficient service delivery.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Alexander Serenko

The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of prior scientometric research of the knowledge management (KM) field.

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2000

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of prior scientometric research of the knowledge management (KM) field.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 108 scientometric studies of the KM discipline were subjected to meta-analysis techniques.

Findings

The overall volume of scientometric KM works has been growing, reaching up to ten publications per year by 2012, but their key findings are somewhat inconsistent. Most scientometric KM research is published in non-KM-centric journals. The KM discipline has deep historical roots. It suffers from a high degree of over-differentiation and is represented by dissimilar research streams. The top six most productive countries for KM research are the USA, the UK, Canada, Germany, Australia, and Spain. KM exhibits attributes of a healthy academic domain with no apparent anomalies and is progressing towards academic maturity.

Practical implications

Scientometric KM researchers should use advanced empirical methods, become aware of prior scientometric research, rely on multiple databases, develop a KM keyword classification scheme, publish their research in KM-centric outlets, focus on rigorous research of the forums for KM publications, improve their cooperation, conduct a comprehensive study of individual and institutional productivity, and investigate interdisciplinary collaboration. KM-centric journals should encourage authors to employ under-represented empirical methods and conduct meta-analysis studies and should discourage conceptual publications, especially the development of new frameworks. To improve the impact of KM research on the state of practice, knowledge dissemination channels should be developed.

Originality/value

This is the first documented attempt to conduct a meta-analysis of scientometric research of the KM discipline.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Daniel Sébastien Matzkin

In third world countries the subsistence of millions of persons depends on the work of organizations operating in the non‐profit sector. The purpose of this paper to

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2021

Abstract

Purpose

In third world countries the subsistence of millions of persons depends on the work of organizations operating in the non‐profit sector. The purpose of this paper to explore how knowledge management awareness and practices could create more efficient organizations despite their lack of human and financial resources. This paper aims to make a contribution to the knowledge management literature in the non‐profit sector of third world countries. In particular, the main results from an explorative survey of Peruvian non‐profit organizations are analyzed and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was generated from a questionnaire survey of 106 Peruvian organizations operating in the non‐profit sector. Part of the questionnaire was inspired from an existing knowledge management acquisition cycle for non‐profit organizations.

Findings

Though only medium to low levels of knowledge management awareness were found in the Peruvian non‐profit sector, implicit knowledge management practices were observed on a large scale independently of the size and category of the non‐profit organizations. Some organizational variables and their negative effects on knowledge management practices are discussed.

Practical implications

A guideline to increase organizational efficiency based on the development of knowledge management awareness is suggested.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to explore and present statistical‐based results on knowledge management practices in the non‐profit sector from a third world country.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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