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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Tarmo Kadak and Erkki K. Laitinen

The assessment of the success of Performance Management Systems (PMS) is difficult because there are many success factors, they are mutually dependent on each other, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The assessment of the success of Performance Management Systems (PMS) is difficult because there are many success factors, they are mutually dependent on each other, and located at different hierarchical levels of an organization. Therefore, there is a need to describe the complete logical chain, which makes PMS successful for an organization and to find out a comprehensive list of key factors (KF) affecting the success of PMS. The objective of this research paper is to develop a method to assess success of a PMS based on a logical chain of 14 KF.

Methodology/approach

The research first develops a logical chain based on the 14 KFs on the basis of prior studies and then carries out a survey about these KFs (15 check points) of PMS and their connection to organizational performance for a small sample of firms from two EU countries.

Findings

There are next findings of this study which indicate following: KFs of PMS affect organizational performance; successful PMS improves organizational performance; PMS is successful for the organization when the completeness of the logical chain in PMS is high.

Practical implications

The practical contribution of this study is that findings show that firms can assess their own PMSs and compare their check point values against the values of successful PMS group. This kind of analysis indicates directly improvement potential for the different check points in PMS.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-915-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

David Barnes

This paper reports on research investigating the process of formation of manufacturing strategy in six UK manufacturing small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). Realised…

Abstract

This paper reports on research investigating the process of formation of manufacturing strategy in six UK manufacturing small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). Realised manufacturing strategy can be considered to be the pattern formed in the stream of actions taken within a firm’s manufacturing function. The research aims to locate the source of that stream by identifying the causal origins of strategic manufacturing actions using a strategy charting method. The findings indicate that, for these companies, realised manufacturing strategy is predominantly formed through a bottom‐up emergent process, arising from the preferences of personnel within the manufacturing function. For most strategic manufacturing actions, there is no demonstrable link to business strategy. As such, these firms are not following best‐practice manufacturing strategy literature, which advises that manufacturing strategy be derived from business strategy in a top‐down deliberate process. This is the case despite differences in the size, products, customers, ownership structures and histories of the companies. The paper speculates that, in UK SMEs, more widely, manufacturing strategy may similarly not arise from the pursuit of business objectives. This may be because the concept of manufacturing as a potential strategic weapon is absent in the SME community, or because the formalised top‐down deliberate process of developing manufacturing strategy associated with this concept is inappropriate in the dynamic environments in which most SMEs operate.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Building Markets for Knowledge Resources
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-742-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

K.W. Platts

Research into manufacturing strategy is increasing in popularitybut there are no well established research methodologies which arespecific to the field. Briefly reviews…

Abstract

Research into manufacturing strategy is increasing in popularity but there are no well established research methodologies which are specific to the field. Briefly reviews current methodologies, identifies their shortcomings, and notes areas for improvement. Then discusses a research methodology which was developed to address these. This three‐stage methodology has been successfully applied to the process of formulating manufacturing strategy and suggests that similar methodologies might be appropriate for future strategy research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2017

Abstract

Details

Building Markets for Knowledge Resources
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-742-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

G.D.M. Frizelle

A methodology for implementing CAPM systems is described. Theresearch was motivated by evidence of dissatisfaction with theperformance of current systems, and the…

Abstract

A methodology for implementing CAPM systems is described. The research was motivated by evidence of dissatisfaction with the performance of current systems, and the existence of no generic methodology. A superposition process was employed. Areas of functional management were explored for sources of implementation methodologies and yielded a number of attributes for successful implementation. The emergent structure was then validated against field studies. The result, a methodology for improving control, is a three‐level hierarchy. The first level assesses the ability of the organisation to absorb change. The next considers the options for better control. The lowest level is concerned with implementation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Malin Löfving, Kristina Säfsten and Mats Winroth

– The paper aims at increasing the understanding of how manufacturing strategy formulation can be facilitated in SMEs.

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2148

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims at increasing the understanding of how manufacturing strategy formulation can be facilitated in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research presented in this paper follows a four-stage logic. Initially, a literature review was conducted identifying a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks. Thereafter, theoretical and practical assessment criteria were established. The SME requirements were identified through five case studies. Based on these assessment criteria, identified manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were evaluated. When a framework was found that fulfilled most of the requirements set out, a detailed analysis of the framework was done, based on criteria related to specific SME characteristics.

Findings

In total, 15 different manufacturing strategy formulation frameworks were identified in the literature. To evaluate the suitability of these frameworks in SMEs, a number of assessment criteria were established, both in theory and in practice. These assessment criteria were grouped into three parts based on their character: procedure, realisation and contextual issues. The assessment of the 15 frameworks revealed that among the identified frameworks there was one framework that stood out and fulfilled several of the criteria. However, the frameworks still need to be adapted to the specific SME characteristics.

Originality/value

Although a number of manufacturing strategy frameworks exist, their usability in practice has seldom been investigated. The results presented provide valuable knowledge for the continued work of rendering manufacturing strategy frameworks suitable and thereby useful for SMEs.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Eduardo Gadotti Martins, Edson Pinheiro de Lima and Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a quality management system (QMS) implementation process for a medical devices manufacturer, which are covered by ISO…

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1524

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a quality management system (QMS) implementation process for a medical devices manufacturer, which are covered by ISO 13485:2007 and RDC No. 59:2000 and based on operations strategy content definitions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research strategy is based on the Cambridge approach which is supported by action research techniques for producing “application” processes. This research strategy is also known as the “Process Approach” or “the Engineering Approach” and was developed in the mid-1990s by researchers from the “Institute for Manufacturing” (IFM/University of Cambridge).

Findings

The results reveal how real conditions “shape” implementation, indicating solutions for integrating procedures for performance and control indicators that represent manufacturing strategy objectives. The regulatory framework and the manufacturing environment offer these real conditions. The operations strategy that is underlying implementation shows how to reconcile regulation and strategy through its content.

Research limitations/implications

The developed process can be improved by increasing the number of test cases until they bring no new contributions for its evolution. However, because it is a long-term and complex implementation process, the present research was concluded with a full understanding of process development.

Practical implications

The QMS implementation process based on the Cambridge Engineering approach creates several opportunities for discussing QMS design requirements, but also in testing procedures for quality policy deployment. Learning by doing is a practical contribution of the process as a participative component effectively applied in different moments at the mentioned workshops – WSH. The logical organization of the QMS implementation process shows causalities among manufacturing strategy, QMS and performance measurements, creating strategic coherence among the connected elements.

Originality/value

Although many studies had approached the QMS implementation, few of them actually addressed the system integration with the business strategic objectives. None of the studies to date related the implementation to the ISO 13485:2003 and the RDC No. 59.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

L.E. Cánez, K.W. Platts and D.R. Probert

The make‐or‐buy question represents a fundamental dilemma faced by many companies. Companies have finite resources and cannot always afford to have all manufacturing…

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10417

Abstract

The make‐or‐buy question represents a fundamental dilemma faced by many companies. Companies have finite resources and cannot always afford to have all manufacturing technologies in‐house. This has resulted in an increasing awareness of the importance of make‐or‐buy decisions. This paper reports on the development of a make‐or‐buy framework to address the make‐or‐buy decision for either a specific individual part or family of parts. Firstly, a literature review of the principal make‐or‐buy approaches is discussed. Secondly, the development of a make‐or‐buy framework is described and the framework is explained and illustrated using case studies. Thirdly, the operationalisation of the framework is outlined. The paper concludes with a discussion of its contribution to both the academic understanding of the subject, and the improvement of industrial practice.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Roy Maslen and Ken W. Platts

Discusses a refinement to the process by which manufacturing strategy is created. Builds on an existing strategy process (Platts, 1990) and adapts it to fit more closely…

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2608

Abstract

Discusses a refinement to the process by which manufacturing strategy is created. Builds on an existing strategy process (Platts, 1990) and adapts it to fit more closely within the dynamic manufacturing vision. The method for creating a manufacturing vision allows a business to do this in a two‐ to three‐week period as part of a 10‐12 week manufacturing strategy project. A conceptual model of manufacturing vision has been developed that enables practitioners to explore the factors that influenced the potential competitive contribution of manufacturing and to agree an explicit direction for change. Describes the successful application of the process in six manufacturing organizations and highlights the practical limitations of the approach.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

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