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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Laura Smith, Roger Maull and Irene C.L. Ng

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into operations management of the product-service (P-S) transition, known as servitization, and the resulting…

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7639

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide further insight into operations management of the product-service (P-S) transition, known as servitization, and the resulting product service system (PSS) offerings. In exploring the P-S transition, this paper adopts a service-dominant (S-D) logic view of value creation, using it as a lens through which to explore value propositions of the P-S transition and their operations design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an in-depth case study of an original equipment manufacturer of durable capital equipment who, over the last five years, has expanded its offerings to include use- and result-orientated PSS. The research design uses a multi-method approach; employing 28 in-depth qualitative interviews with customers and employees and analysis of texts, documents and secondary data including five years of enterprise resource planning (ERP), call centre and contract data.

Findings

The paper identifies ten generic P-S attributes that are abstracted into four nested value propositions: asset value proposition; recovery value proposition; availability value proposition; and outcome value proposition. In examining the operations design for delivery of these value propositions, it is found that the role and importance of contextual variety increases as the organisation moves through the value propositions. Interdependencies amongst the value propositions and differences in operational design for each value proposition are also found.

Research limitations/implications

The paper investigates PSS through a S-D logic mindset. First, the paper considers value propositions of PSS not according to “product” or “service” but in terms of how resources (both material and human) are optimally designed to co-create customer value. Second, a value co-creation system of nested value propositions is illustrated. In so doing, the findings have a number of implications for literature on both PSS and S-D logic. In addition, the research adds to the PSS literature through the identification and consideration of the concept of contextual use variety.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the complexity of the transition from product to service. Specifically, service cannot be seen as a bolt-on extra to their product offering; complexity caused by interactions and changes to the core offering require a systems perspective and consideration of both firm and customer skills and resources.

Originality/value

This paper extends existing literature on the P-S transition and its implications for operations management. Notably, it takes an S-D logic perspective of value creation and in so doing highlights the importance and role of contextual use variety in the P-S transition. It also provides further empirical evidence that the P-S transition cannot be treated as discrete stages but is evolutionary and requires a complex systems perspective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Johann C.K.H. Riedel, Jacqueline Lewis and Kulwant Pawar

The research reported here derives from a recently completedquestionnaire survey of the UK mechanical engineering industry and aseries of follow‐up case studies. The case…

Abstract

The research reported here derives from a recently completed questionnaire survey of the UK mechanical engineering industry and a series of follow‐up case studies. The case studies investigated the product design strategies adopted by firms for achieving competitive edge. It was found that companies were consolidating their product ranges and increasing the use of bought‐out components. There had thus been a shift from internal manufacturing (hierarchy) to bought‐out manufacturing (market). This was complemented by the changes, over the last few years, in the production system. That is, the adoption of manufacturing, or FMS, cells. Here, companies were feeding more components through these machining cells rather than using other, more expensive, manufacturing techniques, such as die casting. Thus, product design has had to match these changes in manufacturing strategy. Increased competition from Japan had also led companies to reduce lead times on product introduction. The research identifies the product design strategies the firms had adopted to achieve competitive edge. These were the better management of the product design process through project teams or project management. The use of design reviews for tailoring designs for efficient manufacture and early consideration of manufacturability. The full utilization of prototypes to eliminate production difficulties. These management factors and the ability to use CAD/CAM‐FMS technology enabled the companies to maintain competitive edge.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Johann C.K.H. Riedel and Kulwant S. Pawar

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production…

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1642

Abstract

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production were considered in the design of products and when. Demonstrates that at the prototype stage production aspects became the most important. This shows that the manufacturability of the product is not considered until after it has been designed. Concludes that the effective and efficient manufacture of the product is not given sufficient attention by mechanical engineering firms. Also investigates the involvement of production personnel in the design process. Finds that production engineering was more extensively involved in the design process the closer it moved towards manufacture. Points to further research which hopes to address this lack by providing practical tools for the application of concurrent engineering.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Abstract

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Min Zhang, Kulwant S. Pawar, Janat Shah and Peeyush Mehta

Many pharmaceutical companies outsource their research and development and manufacturing operations to value chain partners. Effective evaluation of outsourcees'…

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2581

Abstract

Purpose

Many pharmaceutical companies outsource their research and development and manufacturing operations to value chain partners. Effective evaluation of outsourcees' capabilities and relationship management are often central for outsourcers to secure sustainable competitive advantage. This study aims to investigate how to evaluate outsourcees and manage outsourcing relationships in the pharmaceutical industry based on the theory of dynamic capability (DC).

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation used an exploratory multiple case study approach. The data collection, spanning a period of 12 months, entailed a multinational pharmaceutical company (PharmCo) with its headquarters in Europe, and four contract research and manufacturing organizations from China and India.

Findings

The results show that PharmCo evaluates its outsourcing partners based on their dynamic capabilities, which include processes (project deliverables, communication, and accuracy of costs), positions (financial assets, number of scientists, spectrum of services, and geographical presence), and paths (past experiences). The findings indicate that a pharmaceutical company outsources to partners with high operational capabilities, whereas it builds fully integrated outsourcing relationships only with those that have high dynamic capabilities.

Practical implications

Findings from this study provide guidelines for practitioners in manufacturing industries to efficiently and effectively evaluate and manage outsourcees to deal with the challenges and risks associated with strategic outsourcing.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by providing empirical evidence on the role of DC in outsourcee evaluation and outsourcing relationship management in the pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, the paper illustrates how to conceptualize and measure the DC as a multi-dimensional construct. The analysis also indicates that partners' dynamic and operational capabilities play different roles in outsourcing relationship management.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Atanu Chaudhuri, Helen Rogers, Peder Soberg and Kulwant S. Pawar

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges faced by industrial firms at different phases of adoption of 3D printing (3DP), and outline how 3DP service providers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify challenges faced by industrial firms at different phases of adoption of 3D printing (3DP), and outline how 3DP service providers can help address these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Separate interview questionnaires for 3DP users and 3DP service providers were used to conduct semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The key 3DP adoption challenges are as follows: creating a business case; difficulty in using different materials; optimising the process for specific parts; lack of “plug and play” solutions offered by equipment manufacturers; limited availability of training and educational support; poor end product quality; machine breakdowns; and high cost of maintenance and spare components. Using the theoretical lens of the technology acceptance model, results show a lack of ease of use and technological turbulence impact companies’ decisions to adopt 3DP. 3DP service providers can indeed attempt to alleviate the above challenges faced by customers through providing multiple 3DP services across different stages of adoption.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine the role of 3DP equipment manufacturers and design and modeling software solutions providers in improving adoption and how 3DP equipment manufacturers could develop into more integrated service providers as the technology advances.

Practical implications

Service providers can help customers transition to 3DP and should develop a portfolio of services that fits different phases of adoption.

Originality/value

The paper outlines how 3DP service providers can help address customer challenges in adoption of 3DP across different stages of adoption.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Helen Rogers, Norbert Baricz and Kulwant S. Pawar

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such…

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6152

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and classify the available types of 3D printing services, with the scope of determining the potential implications that such services could have on the supply chains of manufacturing firms and creating a research agenda for future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the current literature on the potential supply chain impacts of 3D printing and evaluate the 3D printing services provided by 404 firms in selected European markets.

Findings

The results show that 3D printing services form a rapidly evolving industry, with new service providers entering the market on a regular basis. Evidence from the European markets investigated suggests that services can be classified into three distinct categories: generative, facilitative and selective services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an attempt to take stock of a fast-moving and potentially paradigm-shifting market. The implications are dynamic as new applications, business models and techniques are continually being developed. Further studies are required to substantiate the findings.

Practical implications

Three categories of 3D printing services that could significantly impact supply chain configurations of the future are proposed. Several issues specific to 3D printing services raised in the research agenda require further scrutiny and substantiation before services can reach their full potential.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the growing 3D printing services industry, highlighting how the market might change as additive manufacturing technology matures.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Kulwant Pawar, Paul Forrester and John Glazzard

Concerned with the application of a product cost reductiontechnique known as Value Analysis (VA). Demonstrates that wellestablished companies like Chubb are realizing the…

Abstract

Concerned with the application of a product cost reduction technique known as Value Analysis (VA). Demonstrates that well established companies like Chubb are realizing the importance of VA to increasing their product focus and the benefits achievable through the use of this technique. Centres upon the application of VA: why the technique was seen as appropriate to the needs of Chubb and what comprises VA; the process of establishing the team within Chubb to undertake the VA exercise; the work carried out by the members of the team and their achievements. Gives an overview and lessons learned from the exercise.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Kulwant S. Pawar and Sudi Sharifi

Aims to examine aspects of virtual collocation of teams in the context of concurrent engineering (CE). Argues that design activities have implications for people and…

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1027

Abstract

Aims to examine aspects of virtual collocation of teams in the context of concurrent engineering (CE). Argues that design activities have implications for people and structures in the organization. Teaming has meant that more social and physical interactions within the design environment may improve the design process and its outcome. Explores the evolution of virtual collocation of product design teams. Presents selected results from a set of on‐going pan‐European projects as well as other investigations undertaken by the authors. Attempts to highlight paradoxes and dilemmas in setting up physically and virtually collocated teams. These issues are further explored via in‐depth case studies depicting product design and development activities in manufacturing organisations. Concludes by highlighting the characteristics that are associated with effectively performing collocated teams. These are summarised into three phases: pre‐set up, operational and post‐operational.

Details

International Journal of Agile Management Systems, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1465-4652

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Hiroshi Katayama

In this paper, a systematic design procedure for an international mutual parts supply system for global car manufacturing is proposed and investigated. This procedure…

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1621

Abstract

In this paper, a systematic design procedure for an international mutual parts supply system for global car manufacturing is proposed and investigated. This procedure offers a rational way to determine the production countries of individual parts/components as well as the import countries for their procurement operations. The proposed procedure consists of three major steps, mathematical programming model development for minimum cost production‐logistic network design, database construction for model analysis and execution of mathematical programming model to obtain a recommendable global production‐logistics system. Actual data from the ASEAN‐China region are collected and processed by the proposed procedure for validity analysis. The results obtained through the investigation have confirmed the effectiveness of the procedure as a decision support model/database for designing such very large systems.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 19 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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