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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

B.T. Sampath Kumar and K.R. Prithvi Raj

The worldwide web is growing at an enormous speed and web citations are becoming very common in scholarly publications. However the major problem of web citation is its…

Abstract

Purpose

The worldwide web is growing at an enormous speed and web citations are becoming very common in scholarly publications. However the major problem of web citation is its persistence since citations disappear over time, causing accessibility problems for readers. In this context the present study aims to investigate the availability of web citations and their persistence in Indian Library and Information Science literature. The study also aims to investigate types of link accessibility errors encountered, domains associated with missing web citations and the correlation between the path depth and missing web citations.

Design/methodology/approach

The web citations (URLs) from 350 articles published in Indian Association of Teachers in Library and Information Science (IATLIS) conference volume (2001‐2008) were extracted and then tested to determine the accessibility. The W3C Link Checker (http://validator.w3.org/checklink) was used to evaluate links associated with a cited web resource. This link checker tests a submitted web page for broken or non‐valid hypertext links and reports the types of HTTP messages encountered.

Findings

Results of the study show that the average citations per article have been increased substantially from 0.25 (in the year 2001) to 3.02 (in the year 2008). It also found that 45.61 per cent of citations are not accessible during the time of testing, and the majority of web citations show HTTP Error Code 404 (63.84 per cent). Web citations from the .org domain are found to have the highest failure rates (30.29 per cent) compared to .edu (21.49 per cent) and .com/.co (14.33 per cent) domains.

Originality/value

The researchers analysed 673 web citations from 350 articles published during 2001 to 2008 in IATLIS conference volumes. The study investigated the percentage of missing web citations and domains associated with missing web citations. The study suggests some possible solutions to improve web citation accessibility. This carries research value for web content providers, web authors and researchers in library and information science.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kanupriya Misra Bakhru, Manas Behera and Alka Sharma

This paper aims to examine the traditional business communities and family businesses of India, their emergence and sustained growth.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the traditional business communities and family businesses of India, their emergence and sustained growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the role of business communities in family businesses of India and identify business communities that have still sustained and marked a global presence.

Findings

Business communities such as Marwaris have the knack for business activities and are leaders of family businesses in India today, who have sustained their past success and continue to create new histories. Other traditional business communities such as Parsis, Sindhis, Chettiars and Gujarati banias have not been able to sustain much. Possible reasons were switching to white-collar jobs, taking up diplomacy and other professions, inter caste marriages, international migration in search of business and Indian government policies.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a useful source of information for academics, policy-makers and economists.

Practical implications

Traditional business communities populate the list of family businesses that have marked their global presence. This paper identifies various factors that are responsible for the growth and sustainability of these business communities.

Social implications

The study clarifies the role of business communities in domestic economic development.

Originality/value

The paper explored traditional business communities of India and assessed their role in family businesses of India that currently mark a global presence.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Franklin Gyamfi Agyemang, Henry Boateng and Michael Dzigbordi Dzandu

– This study aims to ascertain the contents of universities in Ghana libraries’ websites and find the dialogic potential of the websites.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to ascertain the contents of universities in Ghana libraries’ websites and find the dialogic potential of the websites.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative content analysis technique was used. The sample includes the libraries’ websites of universities in Ghana that have received presidential charter. A checklist was developed to assess the content of the websites. In assessing the dialogic potential of the websites, Kent and Taylors’ framework was used.

Findings

Findings from the study show that Ghanaian universities libraries’ websites are providing only static information about libraries and their services. The libraries’ websites are deficient in providing vital information on newspapers, print journals, frequently asked questions and date of post. Again, findings of the study indicate that universities in Ghana libraries’ websites have poor dialogic features.

Originality/value

There is no study investigating the dialogic potential of universities in Ghana libraries’ websites.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Niranjan Devkota, Udaya Raj Paudel and Udbodh Bhandari

This paper explores entrepreneurs' expectation from the new provincial government to protect sociocultural values for promoting touristic city – Pokhara, Nepal.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores entrepreneurs' expectation from the new provincial government to protect sociocultural values for promoting touristic city – Pokhara, Nepal.

Design/methodology/approach

The purposive sampling technique was applied to source the information from the respondents resided at Pokhara. Structured questionnaire techniques and cross-sectional descriptive method were used to collect data from 393 tourism entrepreneurs to explore their understanding and existing situations.

Findings

About 85.5% of the respondents argue that the new government system has affected their business and 58.27% feel procedural complexities due to new political administrative system. Natural beauty, growing pollution, unmanaged urbanizations, good flow of the tourists and sustainability of the touristic city resulted as main aspects of Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threats. The entrepreneurs expect that newly formed provincial government should provide business security, formulate appropriate tax policy and provision for business insurance scheme for smooth operation, growth and sustainability of their tourism entrepreneurship.

Research limitations

The research was taken in Pokhara, only the entrepreneurs mostly resided at Lakeside were taken and wider research across the whole city would give a more balanced perspective.

Practical implication

Recommendations are made with the aim of uplifting entrepreneurship milieu in the touristic city Pokhara in order to promote tourism business of Pokhara.

Social implication

This research can help local authority to take local residents' and entrepreneurs' experience into consideration for creating better plan and policies for the well-being of Pokhara.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to provide data from the perspective of entrepreneurs' expectation from newly formed Gandaki provincial government in Pokhara, Nepal.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Naomi Fillmore

The history of Nepal gives some insight into its current status as a diverse and multilingual nation with more than 123 languages. Multilingualism is part of the founding…

Abstract

The history of Nepal gives some insight into its current status as a diverse and multilingual nation with more than 123 languages. Multilingualism is part of the founding philosophy of the country but since it was unified in 1768, government attitudes to language and language education have fluctuated. Though historically education in Nepal has been delivered exclusively in the Nepali language and, more recently, in English, the Government of Nepal is now committed to introducing mother tongue-based, multilingual education (MLE).

Nepal has among the lowest literacy rates in the world (UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 2015) and the government seeks to turn this trend around, particularly for students who do not speak Nepali as a mother tongue. The commitment to strengthening mother tongue-based MLE features prominently in the Constitution of Nepal (2015), the Act Relating to Compulsory and Free Education (2018) and the School Sector Development Plan (MOEST, 2018). This new constitution declares that “all the mother tongues spoken in Nepal shall be the national language” (2015 article 6).

Implementing these policy commitments in over 120 languages across seven provinces and 753 municipalities is the next challenge for the fledgling democracy. As a “wicked hard” policy area, doing so will require a solid understanding of local attitudes, beliefs, resources, and capacities. This chapter gives a unified review of the history, languages, ideologies, beliefs, and trends that currently influence MLE in Nepal and are likely to play a role into the future.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2019
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-724-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2009

M. Dutta

The introduction of the 22 member countries of the 4+10+2+6 model of the Asian economy is the immediate task. Japan, Korea, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines…

Abstract

The introduction of the 22 member countries of the 4+10+2+6 model of the Asian economy is the immediate task. Japan, Korea, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar constitute the now-famous 4+10 model. Following the principle of inclusion, Mongolia, Chinese Taipei, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka, as they belong to the regional map of the continent of Asia, are the eight remaining member countries (see Chapter 1). An overview of Asia's 22 member continental economy the AE-22, with its 3.6 billion people (2006) who have made the region of Asia their home in a land area of 20.5 million km2 should be welcome. To put these figures in perspective, the AE-22 comprises only 13.7 percent of the world's land area, but is home to over half the world's population. Tables 2.1–2.4, presented below, illustrate the various figures relating to population, land area, GDP, and GDP per capita of the member nations of the AE-22.

Details

The Asian Economy and Asian Money
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-261-6

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