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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

K. Sivakumar

The nature of competition between different tiers (e.g. high‐tier vs low‐tier brands) has become an important research domain for academic researchers and marketing…

1845

Abstract

The nature of competition between different tiers (e.g. high‐tier vs low‐tier brands) has become an important research domain for academic researchers and marketing managers. Although research on inter‐tier competition is growing at an increasing rate, there has not been a comprehensive attempt to summarize the research in this stream. The objective of this article is to synthesize the research on inter‐tier competition, extract the key findings, discuss managerial implications, and offer future research directions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

K. Sivakumar

During the last decade, we have witnessed a steady stream of research focusing on the nature of competition between different brand tiers (e.g. high‐priced brands vs…

1477

Abstract

During the last decade, we have witnessed a steady stream of research focusing on the nature of competition between different brand tiers (e.g. high‐priced brands vs low‐priced brands, national brands vs store label brands). Several interesting research findings have been reported in the literature. This article highlights the methodological issues associated with the research on price‐tier competition and delineates the connection between methodological issues and managerial implications of the substantive research findings.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2018

Khadija Ali Vakeel, K. Sivakumar, K.R. Jayasimha and Shubhamoy Dey

The purpose of this paper is to focus on failures in online flash sales (OFS) and to explore why consumers participate in an OFS even after experiencing service failure…

1711

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on failures in online flash sales (OFS) and to explore why consumers participate in an OFS even after experiencing service failure. It also examines the role of deal proneness, attribution, and emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach to gain insights into this relatively unexplored phenomenon of OFS, this research uses netnography followed by a survey study.

Findings

The findings show that deal-prone customers tend to ignore service failures during OFS and re-participate in the future. In the context of OFS, failures attributed to internal locus of attribution (LOA) also have a negative effect on re-participation compared with failures attributed to external LOA. Furthermore, there is a three-way interaction among deal proneness, LOA, and past emotions. The results show that negative past emotions further exacerbate the impact of attribution on the link between deal proneness and re-participation.

Originality/value

In contrast with prior research, the paper shows that consumers participate even after service failure. The proposed difference is between customers who experience different LOA and past emotions offers insights into their behavior after service failure in a new context of an online/electronic commerce event – flash sales. This paper specifically explores the role of internal LOA and finds that it has a more negative impact than external LOA on re-participation.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

K. Sivakumar and Subroto Roy

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to propose that the nature and degree of control during new product development (NPD) outsourcing depends upon its initiation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to propose that the nature and degree of control during new product development (NPD) outsourcing depends upon its initiation stage or implementation stage; second, to delineate the moderating effect of globalization and digitizability that further influence the link between NPD stage and control systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a conceptual framework and develop a series or propositions.

Findings

The nature and degree of control systems required in NPD is contingent upon the stage of the NPD process and this relationship is moderated by the degree of globalization and digitizability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a conceptual platform that can be explored in future empirical research. The paper offers a series of propositions as well as measurement items to enable this task.

Practical implications

The research underscores the idea that instituting appropriate control systems in outsourcing NPD is a complex process that requires careful consideration of the nature of the activity, the nature of the control and firm strategy.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to conceptually examine the domain of the three-way intersection of NPD stage-gate process, outsourcing relationships and control systems. By doing so, the authors extend each of the three individual research domains in new directions as well as enhance the understanding of the interrelationships among these three domains.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

K. Sivakumar

This article aims to extend the price‐quality trade‐off framework to derive new results for differential pricing strategies for brands in different brand tiers. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to extend the price‐quality trade‐off framework to derive new results for differential pricing strategies for brands in different brand tiers. The results are demonstrated for different market configurations.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework based on the quality‐price trade‐off from existing literature is used to analytically derive research hypotheses regarding pricing strategies. The results are demonstrated empirically by extending previously published results.

Findings

The study reveals that optimal pricing strategies are dependent on the tier to which the brands belong. Promotional pricing is better for high‐tier brands, while everyday low price is better for low‐tier brands. Similarly, deep and infrequent price promotions are better for high‐tier brands, while shallow and frequent promotions are better for low‐tier brands.

Practical implications

The findings offer some important implications of the brand‐tier competition framework for determining optimal pricing strategies and can inform pricing strategies for brands in different tiers.

Originality/value

Asymmetric inter‐tier competition is demonstrated for different market configurations, and the framework is used to derive optimal pricing strategy implications for brands in different tiers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Sivakumar K., Jeyapaul R., Vimal K.E.K. and Pratthosh Ravi

Sustainable end-of-life (Sus-EoL) practices can be achieved through manufacturing of sustainable products, and recovery and recycling after the use phase. To achieve…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable end-of-life (Sus-EoL) practices can be achieved through manufacturing of sustainable products, and recovery and recycling after the use phase. To achieve Sus-EoL, the manufacturing organizations should handle their products after their EoL. The recovery of used products is achieved through the design of the collection location. However, the first step is to understand and identify the barriers (e.g. lack of awareness among people, lack of technology, etc.) which prevent the implementation of Sus-EoL practices. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is about the 18 barriers responsible for the poor success of Sus-EoL practices of used plastic parts. By applying the DEMATEL method and by incorporating experts’ knowledge, a prominence and causal relationship diagram was developed through which the influential strength among barriers was studied.

Findings

The α value is computed as 0.068, and the values lower than α were eliminated to obtain the digraph. Poor curbside pick is identified as the most dominant barrier in implementation of Sus-EoL practices in plastic parts with an influential score of 3.96.

Research limitations/implications

The research is conducted in the Indian scenario which could be extended to global context by selecting the suitable barriers.

Practical implications

The results from the study can be used by the managers of organizations to enhance the possibility of Sus-EoL practices by incorporating suitable strategies which is the significant contribution of this study.

Originality/value

In the past, few authors discussed about the barriers of Sus-EoL practices; however, the analysis of complex interrelationship does not exist. Thus, the global and group interrelationship has been studied which is expected to pave way for future research in the direction of elimination of barriers and so on.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

K. Sivakumar

– This research aims to examine the role of national culture dimensions in the nature of tier competition between high-tier brands and low-tier brands.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the role of national culture dimensions in the nature of tier competition between high-tier brands and low-tier brands.

Design/methodology/approach

It starts with a conceptual framework based on prospect theory to explain the asymmetric inter-tier competition. It then describes how the national culture dimensions influence the implications of prospect theory and as a result, the nature of inter-tier competition. The paper uses Hofstede's framework to operationalize national culture and derives a number of research propositions that explicate the role of national culture in inter-tier price competition.

Findings

The study finds that the extent of asymmetry favouring high-tier brands over low-tier brands depends on the national culture dimensions. Whereas high levels of individualism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity increase the asymmetry favouring high-tier brands, higher long-term orientation decreases asymmetric price competition favouring high-tier brands.

Practical implications

The findings offer important guidelines for understanding the nature of inter-tier price competition as a function of national culture.

Originality/value

This is the first study to extend inter-tier price competition in the global setting and also the first study that links national culture with prospect theory to examine the boundary conditions of inter-tier price competition.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Himanshu Shekhar Srivastava, K.R. Jayasimha and K. Sivakumar

Access-based services (ABSs) provide short-term access to goods, physical facilities, space or labor in exchange for access fees without transferring legal ownership (e.g…

Abstract

Purpose

Access-based services (ABSs) provide short-term access to goods, physical facilities, space or labor in exchange for access fees without transferring legal ownership (e.g. bike-sharing). This study aims to investigate what service providers can do to minimize financial losses when customers misbehave with the service providers’ assets in ABSs. The study also examines the effects of product misuse on subsequent customers and what factors may mitigate it.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a scenario-based experiment to test the conceptual model.

Findings

Injunctive norms reduce the mediating effect of descriptive norms on misbehavior contagion. As generally accepted and approved (injunctive) norms become salient, they override the impact of prevailing (descriptive) norms, thereby breaking the vicious cycle of misbehavior contagion. Customer-company identification (CCI) and reduced interpersonal anonymity mitigate the effects of previous misbehavior on misbehavior contagion.

Practical implications

ABS firms should strive to mitigate the financial and reputational losses they suffer from customer misbehavior. Such mitigation would be a win-win for the ABS firm (reduced misbehavior) and the customers (improved user experience).

Originality/value

The research complements prior research highlighting the role of social norms in misbehavior contagion. The study demonstrates the role of boundary conditions by investigating the interactive effects of descriptive and injunctive norms. In addition, it shows the positive impact of CCI and reduced interpersonal anonymity on containing misbehavior contagion.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Amit Arora, Anshu Saxena Arora, K. Sivakumar and Gerard Burke

This paper aims to examines the moderating effect of small vs large supply base size on the relationship between strategic sustainable purchasing (SSP) and organizational…

1343

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examines the moderating effect of small vs large supply base size on the relationship between strategic sustainable purchasing (SSP) and organizational sustainability performance (OSP). SSP is conceptualized as a dynamic capability consisting of strategic purchasing and environmental purchasing. Environmental collaboration is conceptualized as a mediator between SSP and OSP. Extant research has not examined the effect of the size of the supply base on the relationship between SSP and OSP.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized relationships are tested using a two-step multi-group analysis in partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

A small supply base size positively moderates the relationship between SSP and environmental collaboration, thus achieving OSP. In contrast, when the supply base is large, strategic purchasing is positively associated with environmental collaboration, while environmental purchasing is negatively related to environmental collaboration. A large supply base has a positive relationship to environmental collaboration and economic sustainability, while the relationship between environmental collaboration and environmental and social performance is not significant.

Practical implications

This research argues that despite the nuances in the moderating effects of small versus large supply base size, managers need to invest in both dynamic and relational capabilities to achieve organizational sustainability.

Originality/value

Scant research is available in supply chain management research that has examined the important effect of the supply base size on the relationship between SSP and OSP. This research aims to fill this gap. The study helps practitioners understand the effects of supply base sizes for their organizations, increase interrelationships among suppliers, reduce the level of differentiation among them, and, thereby, reduce costs and increase revenues.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Shavin Malhotra and K. Sivakumar

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical model of managerial decisions involving international market entry.

2692

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a theoretical model of managerial decisions involving international market entry.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a mathematical model that seeks the optimal level of cultural distance between the host and the home country and the market potential of the host country that maximizes a firm's investment in an international market. The authors illustrate the intuition and the managerial application of the model using a large data set of cross‐border acquisitions, then the results of this data set are used to validate the model in a specific data context.

Findings

The authors find that cultural distance and market potential have curvilinear and interaction effects on the level of equity participation. The empirical results are further used to conduct sensitivity analysis of decisions for changes in parameters.

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ general approach can be used to analyze any two variables that have interaction effect on a variable of interest related to market entry strategies.

Practical implications

The authors illustrate the intuition and the managerial application of the model using a large data set of cross‐border acquisitions. Managers can use this approach in choosing CBA targets.

Originality/value

The study provides a mathematical framework and an empirical illustration of optimizing the cultural distance and market potential for maximizing equity participation in foreign market acquisitions. This is a new unique contribution to the literature.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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