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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Christina Milioti, Katerina Pramatari and Eleni Zampou

The main purpose of this research is to investigate acceptability of different delivery methods in e-grocery (home delivery, pick-up from store, pick-up from locker) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this research is to investigate acceptability of different delivery methods in e-grocery (home delivery, pick-up from store, pick-up from locker) and the respective willingness of customers to pay for them using a stated preference ranking experiment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected involved two countries (Greece and UK) with different level of e-grocery development and two different distribution conditions (weekly and urgent order). Rank-ordered logit model is used to analyse the ranking experiment and calculate the willingness-to-pay (WTP) measures. Delivery mode, cost and time window are used as independent variables.

Findings

Results indicated that home delivery and picking-up from locker appear to be clearly preferable than picking-up from store. However, home delivery seems to hold a stronger competitive position over the other delivery methods, especially in the weekly order and in the UK market. The pick-up from locker option appears to be a competitive delivery mode for consumers who are cost sensitive and shop under urgent conditions. Willingness to use and pay for picking-up from locker increases significantly in the context of same-day delivery.

Practical implications

The information provided in this study will help retailers to design and implement distribution schemes that can meet consumers' preferences for e-grocery. WTP differences among the consumer groups and the distribution conditions examined can have a considerable impact on the evaluation of marketing and pricing strategies applied by e-retailers.

Originality/value

Consumer preference and the respective WTP for different delivery methods in e-grocery, especially for the pick-up from locker option, have not been systematically investigated.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Stratos Baloutsos, Angeliki Karagiannaki and Katerina Pramatari

Discussion regarding systems that promote innovation, aptly named innovation ecosystems, has been intensifying both in academia and business. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Discussion regarding systems that promote innovation, aptly named innovation ecosystems, has been intensifying both in academia and business. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the activity theory as a theoretical framework for conceptualising and studying innovation ecosystems. Using the activity theory, it investigates elements that affect the success and viability of innovation ecosystems formed between startups and incumbent firms, collaborating with an established firm within the context of an open innovation programme.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an exploratory case research approach and proposes the activity theory as a theoretical background to be used in innovation ecosystem research. Based on this approach, this study draws from interviews and research observations in an innovation ecosystem formed between an established firm and various startups that aim to co-develop innovative offerings.

Findings

By applying the activity theory tools, this study identifies several contradictions between interacting actors of this innovation ecosystem that can adversely affect the innovation process. Furthermore, it proposes the use of the activity theory as a fitting theoretical lens to study innovation ecosystems.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study is related to the focus on the incumbent–startup context for extending the innovation ecosystem literature. Using the activity theory as a viable methodological tool allows us to conceptualise firms as social constructs and hence pinpoint inner characteristics that can affect and shape their interactions and the broader ecosystem. This process is further enhanced by the use of primary data that give unique insights into the inner workings of innovation ecosystems by identifying underlying contradictions.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Katerina Pramatari and Panagiotis Miliotis

This paper aims to focus on the store ordering and replenishment practices which appear to be the major cause behind the problem of out‐of‐stock situations. A…

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4015

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the store ordering and replenishment practices which appear to be the major cause behind the problem of out‐of‐stock situations. A collaborative store replenishment practice, enabled by an internet‐based platform is examined. By enabling information and knowledge sharing between retail store managers and suppliers' salesmen, this practice leads to increased order accuracy and, as a result, to fewer out‐of‐stock situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research presented in this paper has been empirical in nature, involving a field experiment with a major retailer and several suppliers in Greece. Pre‐ and post‐experiment measurements were conducted and the quantitative results were statistically analyzed in order to assess the impact of collaborative store ordering on shelf availability. The quantitative measurements were repeated over several years, offering a longitudinal view on the experiment. Qualitative findings from the field experiment are also discussed.

Findings

The empirical results from the field experiment show a reduction in out‐of‐stock situations by more than 50 percent combined with no significant statistical variation in total observed inventory levels. Qualitative findings regarding the practical aspects of the process as well as organizational issues are also acquired.

Originality/value

Low shelf availability and the respective sales loss is one of the major issues retailers and suppliers face today. This paper examines a new replenishment process, involving supplier‐retailer collaboration supported by daily information sharing of POS data and other information over an internet platform, which leads to increased shelf availability by addressing one of its major causes. Thus, the empirical results presented in the paper have important implications for practitioners. In addition, the paper contributes from a methodological perspective to the academic community, by describing the way the field experiment was conducted and the quantitative results were analyzed as a means to evaluate a new business practice and Internet‐based collaboration platform.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Thomas Kelepouris, Katerina Pramatari and Georgios Doukidis

This paper aims to study the main requirements of traceability and examine how the technology of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can address these…

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12691

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the main requirements of traceability and examine how the technology of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can address these requirements. It further seeks to outline both an information data model and a system architecture that will make traceability feasible and easily deployable across a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The design research approach is followed, associating traceability requirements to a proposed system design.

Findings

The technological approach used has great implications in relation to the cost associated with a traceability system and the ease of its deployment.

Research limitations/implications

Validation of the proposed information data model and system architecture is required through practical deployment in different settings.

Practical implications

The paper provides practitioners with insight on how RFID technology can meet traceability requirements and what technological approach is more appropriate.

Originality/value

Food quality has become an important issue in the last decade. However, achieving end‐to‐end traceability across the supply chain is currently quite a challenge from a technical, a co‐ordination and a cost perspective. The paper contributes by suggesting a specific technological approach, exploiting the new possibilities provided by RFID technology, to address these issues.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Ioanna Ferra

Abstract

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Digital Media and the Greek Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-328-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Katerina Pramatari

This paper aims to give an overview of supply chain collaboration practices and the way the underlying enabling technologies have evolved, from the classical EDI approach…

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10846

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give an overview of supply chain collaboration practices and the way the underlying enabling technologies have evolved, from the classical EDI approach, to web‐based and RFID‐enabled collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses alternative technological approaches and the role they play in supporting collaboration. The research presented in this paper is empirical in nature, based on three different case studies from the grocery retail sector depicting different aspects of implementing supply chain collaboration practices.

Findings

From the examination of these cases, interesting lessons are derived regarding the suitability and criticality of the technological approach used to support collaboration, especially regarding the use of a centralized web‐platform as compared to the classical EDI approach and to a decentralized solution based on web services.

Research limitations/implications

Research is limited to the specific case studies and further validation of the research findings through qualitative and quantitative methods would be appropriate.

Practical implications

The paper provides support to practitioner regarding the selection of the appropriate technological approach to support collaboration. Furthermore, it gives insight regarding the maturity of current technologies in relation to collaboration requirements and to what extent can the technology be an enabler or a barrier in a collaboration initiative.

Originality/value

The paper links the technological and the supply‐chain collaboration perspective in order to derive interesting conclusions relevant to both academics and practitioners. The cases presented are quite unique and have not been widely studied, representing interesting and novel approaches to the way that technology has been employed to support collaboration practices.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Josef Hynek, Václav Janeček, Frank Lefley, Kateřina Půžová and Jan Němeček

The purpose of this study/paper is evidence to suggest that information communication technology (ICT) capital projects are different from non-ICT projects and that as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study/paper is evidence to suggest that information communication technology (ICT) capital projects are different from non-ICT projects and that as a result the appraisal of such projects is more difficult. This may suggest that organisations would use dissimilar financial and risk assessment models or place different importance levels on such models between the two types of investment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this issue and present the results of research into the practices of organisations in Czech Republic that have recently undertaken an appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT capital projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A factual and attitudinal survey was developed and conducted during the end of 2011, addressed to organisations based in the Czech Republic. The object of the survey was the identification of current practices in respect of the appraisal of both ICT and non-ICT projects and the opinions of senior executives on a number of important issues regarding such practices. This paper focuses on the issues relating to ICT projects being “different” from non-ICT projects.

Findings

The empirical findings support the literature in that ICT projects are, in many respects, different from non-ICT projects. However, the evidence indicates that, in practice, there is no significant difference in the financial and risk assessment models used in their appraisal. This indicates that any perceived difficulties, which may infer that the projects are “different”, are overcome (or ignored), to some extent, when it comes to the formal financial and risk assessment stage of project appraisal. There is also evidence to suggest that practitioners use assessment models that academics regard as unsophisticated. The findings also show that strategic issues are more important with respect of ICT projects than non-ICT projects. The research therefore supports the view that ICT projects are perceived to be different, but that the current conventional (financial and risk) appraisal models are adequate to appraise such capital projects, provided they are supported by a strategic assessment.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings are based on a survey of companies in the Czech Republic only, we accept that the research results may have some limitations in terms of drawing general conclusions. The concern over drawing general conclusions is also brought about by the relatively low response rate, although the rate is in line with previous published research.

Practical implications

ICT projects are different and as such these differences must be taken into account when appraising capital projects. The evidence supports the need for practitioners to review their appraisal of ICT capital projects, by adopting more sophisticated financial and risk models (as prescribed by academics) and linking their appraisal to corporate strategic goals. Future research should be aimed at identifying the formal and informal strategic approaches adopted by practitioners in the appraisal of ICT capital projects.

Originality/value

This is the only survey to simultaneously address the appraisal issues concerning both ICT and non-ICT projects in the Czech Republic. As such, it gives a valuable insight into the practices of Czech Republic organisations in their appraisal of ICT and non-ICT capital projects. The identification of the four main problem areas with respect to the appraisal of ICT projects will help to focus academic research in the future.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Vicente Pina, Lourdes Torres and Patricia Bachiller

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the economic and technological factors that determine the quality of European telecommunications services. The paper test whether…

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2135

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the economic and technological factors that determine the quality of European telecommunications services. The paper test whether the privatisation, the efficiency and the labour factor of telecommunications operators are determinants of service quality and whether competition, technology and infrastructure investment in the telecommunications sector influence that quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper use the panel data methodology to analyse the factors that determine the quality of service of telecommunications.

Findings

The results indicate that the more efficient the company is, the more quality it will deliver. However, the paper finds no evidence that the privatisation and the restructuring of the labour force of the main telecommunications operators, or the competition, technology and investments in the sector, lead to greater quality.

Practical implications

In order to foster higher quality, effective market competitiveness has to be established to avoid benefitting the incumbent company and to make the development of competition possible in the long run.

Originality/value

Although previous literature assumes a positive relationship between the performance of privatised companies and quality, this study shows that the privatisation and liberalisation processes do not bring about quality improvements by themselves. The research finds that the efficiency of privatised companies is the primary source of quality.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Frank Lefley

The purpose of this paper is to identify current practice in respect of the appraisal of both information communication technology (ICT) and non‐ICT capital investments…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify current practice in respect of the appraisal of both information communication technology (ICT) and non‐ICT capital investments, and to elicit the opinions of senior executives on the various issues concerning such investment practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical research based on data from a postal questionnaire, designed around a factual and attitudinal survey.

Findings

This research presents evidence of the financial and risk assessment models used by practitioners in the appraisal of both ICT and non‐ICT capital projects. It shows that there was no significant difference between ICT and non‐ICT appraisals in this respect. It does, however, show that there are significant differences between the two types of projects in respect to other important appraisal/evaluation issues. It also uncovers important issues regarding ICT globalisation, project champions, post audits and appraisal teams.

Research limitations/implications

This research does not identify the approach adopted, or the models used, to appraise strategic issues. This is an area for future research.

Practical implications

This research presents data that will assist both practitioners and academics in a greater understanding of the appraisal of both ICT and non‐ICT projects, which will pave the way to better decision making in the future.

Originality/value

It is believed that this is possibly the only survey to simultaneously address the appraisal issues concerning both ICT and non‐ICT projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Veronica S Ülgen and Helena Forslund

The purpose of the paper is to explore the practices with logistics performance management in two textiles supply chains, and to identify the related best practices and…

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3759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the practices with logistics performance management in two textiles supply chains, and to identify the related best practices and barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is a multiple case study of two textiles supply chains with a special focus on the rarely addressed interface between the manufacturer and the retail chain. The retail chains represent one large, global retail chain and one Nordic, comparably smaller retail chain. This paper is primarily empirical and describes practices for logistics performance management. The analysis discusses and explains best practices and barriers for logistics performance managements in textiles supply chains.

Findings

Differences were identified regarding practices, priorities and collaboration in the logistics performance management process. No textiles industry-specific practices were found. A way of exchanging action plans between the actors is an interesting best practice, which enables improvement projects even with long geographical distances. Barriers in the shape of difficulties in creating a collaborative culture were found; however, IT support seems no longer to be a barrier.

Research limitations/implications

Two cases are explored, why a broader study is necessary to confirm the results. The best practices and barriers identified are similar to those known from manufacturing companies.

Practical implications

The detailed descriptions of logistics performance management practices can provide insights for practitioners. Even if the studied supply chains are important for the respective actors, there is a potential for increased effectiveness in textiles supply chains.

Originality/value

Supply chains for textiles products “starting at a manufacturer and ending in a retail chain” seem to be an unchartered territory and not many studies have been performed.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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