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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Walter R. Nord, K. Doreen MacAulay and Jessica Lindsay Kelso

The purpose of this conceptual paper is twofold: to investigate the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, and to discuss the effects that several factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is twofold: to investigate the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives, and to discuss the effects that several factors have on CSR outcomes by drawing on concepts from organization theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is used, wherein the authors review the extant literature on CSR theory with the goal of expanding upon theoretical perspectives underlying this area of research.

Findings

The findings show that both initiation and implementation influence CSR outcomes, and that these processes vary based on the degrees of centralization and routineness. In addition, the “fit” between the problems and the processes used influences the benefits of CSR. In short, the authors show that not all CSR initiatives are created equally.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not address the potential magnitude of fit, only the direction of fit, and does not consider other factors that would play a role in successful initiation and implementation. It does not consider nor estimate the costs associated with different approaches to CSR activities. Lastly, it does not consider the history of an organization when discussing various CSR structures.

Originality/value

This study enriches CSR literature by filling the gap in the extant CSR literature and by proposing a more holistic view to CSR initiatives. The authors offer six propositions that purport the effects that various factors (de)centralization, fit, CSR–human resources synergies, transformational leadership and pride have on a company’s CSR activities and recruitment efforts.

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

K. Doreen MacAulay, Mark J. Mellon and Walter R. Nord

This article assesses the ability of Boyer's (1990) four-function definition of scholarship to address critiques of business schools. Boyer's definition of scholarship is…

Abstract

Purpose

This article assesses the ability of Boyer's (1990) four-function definition of scholarship to address critiques of business schools. Boyer's definition of scholarship is presented as the foundation for a paradigmatic shift in higher education in business.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed this conceptual paper by considering information from three sources: 1) Ernest Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate, 2) articles by four well-known pundits of business education as well as critiques appearing in the Academy of Management Learning and Education Journal and 3) articles in which Boyer's work was the focal point of the article found by searching Google Scholar, two well-known education journals, a prominent database of education articles and the International Handbook of Higher Education (Forest and Altbach, 2007).

Findings

A four-function framework based on Boyer's definition of scholarship is proposed to help improve the operations of business schools. The authors also forward ideological and practical implications related to each of Boyer's four functions.

Originality/value

For several decades now, a number of highly respected business scholars have criticized American business education in its current form. These criticisms, although plentiful, have not fueled the magnitude of change needed to have a significant, sustainable impact on business education. The authors suggest that this lack of change is due, in part, to institutional practices and to the absence of a unified framework for how higher education in business should be executed. The authors argue that Boyer's four-function definition of scholarship could provide such a framework.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Robert Marley and Lee Kersting

In this empirical study, the primary aim is to examine whether the type of feedback provided, relative performance information (RPI) vs outcome, affects individual's task…

Abstract

Purpose

In this empirical study, the primary aim is to examine whether the type of feedback provided, relative performance information (RPI) vs outcome, affects individual's task satisfaction in a context without financial incentives. A secondary objective is to explore whether differences in individuals' task satisfaction were associated with their performance level.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed a mundane, effort-based task in a 1 × 2 between-subjects experimental design where the type of feedback was manipulated at two levels (RPI vs outcome).

Findings

The results revealed a positive link between providing RPI feedback to individuals and their self-reported task satisfaction compared to individuals provided with outcome feedback. We find that individuals' task satisfaction is not associated with their task performance, supporting our prediction that the level of knowledge of results affects individuals' task satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The experimental task used in this study was mundane and effort intensive. Consequently, future research may be needed to examine whether the results generalize to more creative, less effort-intensive tasks. This study also utilized student participants as a proxy for employees, which is appropriate for the task, but may not generalize to organizational settings requiring specialized knowledge or task experience.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that organizations may find providing employees with RPI to be a relatively low-cost, non-financial incentive for improving employee task satisfaction, a construct documented to reduce employee turnover and absenteeism.

Originality/value

While prior research focuses on the effects of providing RPI on individuals' performance and effort, this study extends prior research to individuals' task satisfaction, an affective construct, illustrating that RPI is multi-dimensional. Our results also have implications for theory. We extend the feedback proposition of the widely applied Job Characteristics Model (JCM) by illustrating the type of feedback provided to individuals has task satisfaction effects beyond those associated with the mere presence of feedback.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties…

Abstract

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties. Anything that Mr. Jast has to say is said with originality even if the subject is not original; his quality has always been to give an independent and novel twist to almost everything he touches. We think our readers will find this to be so when he touches the important question of “The Library and Leisure.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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