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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Russell Cropanzano, Andrew Li and Keith James

In their chapter, Rupp, Bashshur, and Liao (this volume) have made an impressive contribution to the literature on multi-level justice. These authors have provided both a…

Abstract

In their chapter, Rupp, Bashshur, and Liao (this volume) have made an impressive contribution to the literature on multi-level justice. These authors have provided both a precise conceptual definition of justice climate and a measurement strategy (referent shift) that will greatly smooth the progress of future empirical inquiry. The goal of this commentary is to expand these important ideas by moving in two directions. First, we discuss what it means to be an individual when justice is experienced as a member of a team. Toward this end, we describe research on social identity theory and social categorization theory, emphasizing how these paradigms could further increase our knowledge. Second, we discuss two new manifestations of multi-level justice that have hitherto been neglected: intraunit justice (group perceptions regarding how team members generally treat one another) and interunit justice (perceptions regarding the way one group treats another). All of these multi-level justice concepts are organized into a new taxonomy.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Deborah E. Rupp, Michael Bashshur and Hui Liao

This chapter seeks to integrate and expand on the ideas presented by Cropanzano, Li, and James (this volume), Ambrose and Schminke (this volume), and Rupp, Bashshur, and…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to integrate and expand on the ideas presented by Cropanzano, Li, and James (this volume), Ambrose and Schminke (this volume), and Rupp, Bashshur, and Liao (this volume). First, it summarizes and comments on the key insights made by each set of authors. It then presents five propositions, along with some preliminary evidence supporting each: (1) employees can and do make source-based justice judgments; (2) justice treatment is directed at different targets (including individuals and groups, both internal and external to the organization); (3) global justice climate may be a useful approach to studying justice once the relationship between more specific justice climates (e.g., interunit or intraunit justice climate) is better understood; (4) it is necessary to study both general and specific justice climates to understand the unfolding of justice reactions over time; and (5) a climate for justice can be behaviorally measured and trained.

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Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Abubakr Suliman

The purpose of this paper to aim at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper to aim at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation climate and readiness to innovate on the other hand. The role of innovation climate in predicting readiness to innovate is also examined. Further, the study attempts to test the mediating role of innovation climate in justice-readiness to innovate relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims at exploring the links between employees’ perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice on one hand and innovation climate and readiness to innovate on the other hand. The role of innovation climate in predicting readiness to innovate is also examined. Further, the study attempts to test the mediating role of innovation climate in justice-readiness to innovate relationship.

Findings

The findings revealed that perception of justice played a key role in employees’ perception of innovation climate. Innovation climate was found to be positively and significantly related to readiness to innovate. Employees’ readiness to try new ways of doing things and question the existing habits of the work tended to show significant and positive relationship to organizational justice. Innovation climate played a significant yet a partial role in mediating the link between justice and readiness to innovate.

Research limitations/implications

The sample represented only governmental sector and only one emirate of the UAE's seven emirates. The implications of the findings for researchers together with some future guidelines are discussed in the paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides practitioners with some advice about understanding and managing justice and innovation.

Originality/value

The paper is the first study in the UAE and the Middle East that examines the links between justice, innovation climate and readiness to innovate.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Erich C. Fein, Aharon Tziner, Liat Lusky and Ortal Palachy

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical climate and organizational justice perceptions on the quality of manager‐employee relationships via…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethical climate and organizational justice perceptions on the quality of manager‐employee relationships via leader‐member exchange (LMX). It also aims to explore differences between distributive justice, procedural justice, and interactional justice perceptions as related to LMX. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relative strength of connections between ethical climate, these three types of justice perceptions, and LMX.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted via survey administration of questionnaires. The sample consisted of 105 working adults in an Israeli telecommunications company.

Findings

It was found that there was a significant positive relationship between perceived interactional justice and levels of LMX. No significant relationships were present between LMX and the other types of justice perceptions. Furthermore, it was discovered that there was a significant positive relationship between ethical climate and LMX. As an important, unexpected finding the study discovered a significant negative relationship between ethical climate and procedural justice.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to examine the effects of justice perceptions together with ethical climate perceptions on LMX. As such, these findings offer guidance in the development and implementation of further studies to examine the linkages between these constructs. In particular, it suggests that these findings provide a framework for examining the potential moderating role of ethical climate in the relationship between interactional justice perceptions and LMX.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Mandy Meikle, Jake Wilson and Tahseen Jafry

This paper aims to contribute to the ethical debate over roles and responsibilities to address the injustices of climate change and its impacts. The current impasse over…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the ethical debate over roles and responsibilities to address the injustices of climate change and its impacts. The current impasse over taking action may lie in the very different ways people view the world and their place in it. The aim is to explore some profound contradictions within differing strands of knowledge feeding into common understandings of climate justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of appropriate peer-reviewed and “grey” literature was conducted with a view to defining the term “climate justice”.

Findings

In addition to there being no single, clear definition of climate justice, a fundamental schism was found between what indigenous peoples want to see happen and what industrialised nations can do with respect to both the mitigation of, and adaptation to, climate change.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation to defining climate justice, and reason for publishing, is the lack of peer-reviewed work on this topic.

Practical implications

This paper has many practical implications, the most fundamental of which is the need to reach a consensus over rights to the Earth’s resources. If humanity, within which there are many societies, chooses to follow a truly equitable path post 2015, industrialised countries and corporations will need to move away from “endless growth economics”. The ways in which climate justice might be operationalised in future are considered, including the concept of a “climate-justice” checklist.

Originality/value

While the reconciliation proposed in this paper might be considered idealistic, unless it is acknowledged the Earth’s resources are limited, over-exploited and for all people to use sustainably, thus requiring a reduction in consumption by individuals relatively affluent in global terms, climate negotiators will continue talking about the same issues without achieving meaningful change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Eurig Scandrett

This paper aims to argue that climate justice constitutes a contested discourse reflecting the material interests of social groups that contribute to its production. For…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that climate justice constitutes a contested discourse reflecting the material interests of social groups that contribute to its production. For climate justice to have integrity, it must be rooted in the material interests of those social groups negatively affected by, and engaged in struggles against, the hydrocarbon economy. The paper locates contestation of discourse production in an understanding of social movement processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a theoretical contribution to the debate about climate justice, drawing on data (published and unpublished) from Scotland.

Findings

The paper concludes that scholars engaged in climate justice work should have consideration to the material interest embedded in the discourse. The pedagogical and dialogical work of engagement with the militant particularism of local struggles against the hydrocarbon industry is an important contribution to discourse construction, and ultimately social transformation is required to achieve climate justice.

Research limitations/implications

This is primarily a theoretical paper, although it draws on limited case study data from environmental conflicts in Scotland.

Practical implications

The argument has practical implications for work in climate justice, including research, policy development and social movement mobilisation.

Social implications

This is intended as a contribution to the social transformation required to achieve climate justice.

Originality/value

The paper draws on existing theoretical frameworks, especially Marxian approaches to discourse and social movement studies, to critique and contribute to the newly developing field of climate justice.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Christopher Shaw

This paper aims to use the results of a synthesis of six social science fellowships to explore how alternative framings of the climate justice debate can support fairer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the results of a synthesis of six social science fellowships to explore how alternative framings of the climate justice debate can support fairer climate policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The original fellowships drew on sociology, economics, geography, psychology and international relations. Cross-cutting themes of rights, risks and responsibilities were identified following a series of workshops. Results of these workshops were discussed in a number of policy fora. Analysis of the feedback from that fora is used to propose the case for a rights, risks and responsibilities approach to building a more accessible climate justice debate.

Findings

Existing climate policy unjustly displaces a) responsibility for emission reductions, b) risks from climate impacts and c) loss of rights. Foundational questions of acceptable risk have been ignored and a just climate policy requires procedurally just ways of revisiting this first-order question.

Research limitations/implications

The contribution a rights, risks and responsibilities framework can bring to a process of educating for climate stewardship is at this stage theoretical. It is only through trialling a rights, risks and responsibilities approach to climate justice debates with the relevant stakeholders that its true potential can be assessed.

Practical implications

Policy actors expressed strong resistance to the idea of overhauling current decision-making processes and policy frameworks. However, moving forward from this point with a more nuanced and tactical understanding of the dialectical relationship between rights, risks and responsibilities has the potential to improve those processes.

Social implications

Educating for climate stewardship will be more effective if it adopts an approach which seeks a co-production of knowledge. Beginning with the foundational question of what counts as an acceptable level of climate risk offers an inclusive entry point into the debate.

Originality/value

Reveals limits to public engagement with climate policy generated by a ‘justice’ framing.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Marc Ohana

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of organizational size and individual tenure on the relationship between organizational justice and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of organizational size and individual tenure on the relationship between organizational justice and organizational affective commitment. Based on the literature on organizational justice and justice climate, this paper tests whether the role of justice climate, measured at the organizational level, is affected by these organizational and individual characteristics in determining individual organizational affective commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on 20,936 employees from 1,496 companies that were included in the 2004 Workplace Employment Relationships Survey were used.

Findings

Hierarchical linear modeling analysis shows that the importance of the justice climate extends beyond its effect on individual perceptions. Moreover, whereas the organization size does not influence the justice climate – affective commitment relationship, organizational tenure moderates it.

Originality/value

This study shows the impact of justice climate on affective commitment beyond the effect of individual justice. It also examines organizational (organization size) and individual characteristics (tenure) as possible moderators, constructs rarely considered in studies on justice climate.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Maureen L. Ambrose and Marshall Schminke

The chapter by Rupp, Bashur, and Liao (in this volume) is rich with ideas for the study of a justice climate. This comment on their chapter focuses on three areas that…

Abstract

The chapter by Rupp, Bashur, and Liao (in this volume) is rich with ideas for the study of a justice climate. This comment on their chapter focuses on three areas that flow from their presentation: issues in modeling climate strength, complexity and simplicity in conceptualizing a justice climate, and an alternative conceptualization of a justice climate. Specifically, it describes how polynomial regression and response surface methodology may assist researchers in examining climate fit. The comment also describes the benefits of a simplified view of a justice climate – one focusing on the overall justice climate. Finally, it develops a framework for examining a climate for justice – a climate that promotes fair behavior in organizations.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Deborah E. Rupp, Michael Bashshur and Hui Liao

This chapter reviews research on multi-level organizational justice. The first half of the chapter provides the historical context for this issue, discusses…

Abstract

This chapter reviews research on multi-level organizational justice. The first half of the chapter provides the historical context for this issue, discusses organizational-level antecedents to individual-level justice perceptions (i.e., culture and organizational structure), and then focuses on the study of justice climate. A summary model depicts the justice climate findings to date and gives recommendations for future research. The second half of the chapter discusses the process of justice climate emergence. Pulling from classical bottom-up and top-down climate emergence models as well as contemporary justice theory, it outlines a theoretical model whereby individual differences and environmental characteristics interact to influence justice judgments. Through a process of information sharing, shared and unique experiences, and interactions among group members, a justice climate emerges. The chapter concludes by presenting ideas about how such a process might be empirically modeled.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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