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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Ali A. Alraouf

The term New Normal has become a buzzword to describe the anticipated changes in human life across the globe due to the impact of COVID-19. The paper's purpose is…

Abstract

Purpose

The term New Normal has become a buzzword to describe the anticipated changes in human life across the globe due to the impact of COVID-19. The paper's purpose is challenging the surrender for the notion of the “New Normal” and constructing a framework by which a call for understanding the practice of architecture, urbanism and city planning before the COVID-19 and contest its responsibility towards the city and the community.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, literature review, analysis of emerging positions and interviews are the selected tools for conducting the research. The paper adopts a position perceiving COVID-19 has provided an opportunity for reflections and revisions about the way people dwell on Earth. The paper aims at analyzing the positive impacts of COVID-19 in sociological and urban perspective.

Findings

Consequently, the main finding of the paper, calls for reviving the forgotten normal in the way places, neighborhoods and cities are designed and planned. Lessons learned from the lockdown time and the actions taken will be analyzed with special attention to Gulf States.

Research limitations/implications

In months, New Normal developed as the most used expression since the spread of the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic marked the year 2020 with one of the biggest public health crises of all time, threatening to take away millions of lives. It is already initiating a massive economic crisis, triggering further negative consequences for human life, wellbeing and lifestyle. Numerous researchers illustrate that through history, humans faced the challenges of epidemics and pandemics and were able to use their will, capacities, resources and courage to resist and survive.

Practical implications

Pandemics such as COVID-19 have caused a critical reassessment of urban spaces. This paper examines the city's relationship to concepts such as the individual, society, creativity, production and power to understand the causes and effects of urbanization. Cities, especially the globally significant ones – such as Wuhan, Milan, Madrid, Paris, London, New York, Los Angeles – are disproportionally affected. Thus, the pandemic is evolving into an urban crisis, forcing us to reconsider our deeply held beliefs about good city form and the purpose of planning.

Social implications

The nature of the architectural, urban and planning theory and practice, is responsible for looking ahead, formulating visions and offering alternatives. Consequently, the methodological approach adopted in the paper is structured on three main pillars. First, observing, monitoring, and provide diagnosis (what we learned from isolation). Second, understanding the local, regional and global context as the COVID-19 crisis creates a ripple of change on all levels and requires both global and local understanding. Third, formulating visions and looking ahead

Originality/value

Suffering from epidemics and pandemics is new to our time and our contemporary experience but not new to the history of humankind. Revisiting the concepts of the New Normal vs. the Forgotten Normal and use the outcomes to construct an alternative framework for producing places in the post COVID-19 paradigm crystalize the value and originality of the paper.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Threats from Car Traffic to the Quality of Urban Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-048144-9

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Luis D. Rivero Moreno

In the past years, the importance of the cultural economy has led urbanism to a new perspective. Simultaneously, the main international institutions have pointed out the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past years, the importance of the cultural economy has led urbanism to a new perspective. Simultaneously, the main international institutions have pointed out the need to shift the urban economy into a sustainable one, green and energy efficient. The confluence of both flows explains why the imaginaries of the urban future are related to the concept of creative cities. Hence, the new economic engine of the cities should be founded on art, creativity and culture, all of them understood as clean energies. This study aims to show the crucial role of cultural heritage as a propeller of a new kind of urban development, more flexible and democratic, based on the construction of the city as a communicational, collective and open effort. Therefore, the city is conceived as a cultural heritage platform where tangible and intangible, social and creative interactions happen. Within this context, urban narratives appear as a dynamic material drawn on the possibilities offered by the heritage received from the past as a resource to be used for re-thinking and re-shaping the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this paper is based on a profound analysis of historical cities, mainly in the European context, supported by the work carried out within the H2020 ROCK project. The cities within the project are: Athens, Bologna, Cluj-Napoca, Eindhoven, Lisbon, Liverpool, Lyon, Torino, Skopje and Vilnius. A wide variety of case studies coming mainly from these cities have been considered to understand better the theoretical point of view on the role of heritage, urban development and city branding. The information about cultural heritage projects used as case studies has been collected and selected coming from the direct work made on the field and the communication open with institutions and cultural stakeholders in every city. Even more, parallel seminars on cultural heritage and city branding organized within the project have allowed the authors to gather very valuable, updated and fresh information on these issues in every particular case.

Findings

The study proves that cultural heritage has been traditionally underrated as a mechanism for developing the future of the city and its communicative strategy. Cultural heritage appears as a practical tool for constructing more cohesive urban communities based on the use of public space and shared memories as storytelling platforms. The capacity of resiliency and sustainability revealed by cultural heritage through the time is, as well, a clear reference to construct a potential sustainable city, socially, culturally and environmentally.

Social implications

Cultural heritage projects are shown as a perfect way to build stronger communities. Through the engagement and participation of citizens, urban storytelling reinforces a more open, real and sustainable city able to face the challenges of contemporary life (gentrification, pollution, mobility, etc.). Like that, heritage appears as a feasible tool for including citizens coming from all ages and backgrounds in the construction of a collective narrative of the city, based on the past and looking at the foreseen.

Originality/value

This study tries to relate fields that traditionally have remained not well connected: urban development, city branding and cultural heritage. The study demonstrates that cultural heritage is crucial as an urban narrative tool and consequently, as a planning/branding mechanism. Moreover, cultural institutions and cultural projects are very relevant platforms for social interaction, inviting citizens to have a more active role in the construction of the city as a collective communicational effort based on a network of social and cultural relations. Storytelling turns up as a new key element for communicating the city from grassroots, in a sustainable, democratic and inclusive manner, far away from the traditional top-down official perspective. Crowdsourcing methods are very powerful for establishing a shared and cohesive city brand, now rooted in its cultural and social foundations and not the marketing campaign clichés. Finally, storytelling emerges as a creative resource that enhances the social, cultural and economic layout of the city, forcing urbanists to include a greener, fairer and more democratic perspective in the future of cities.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Peter Nientied

This paper aims to discuss tourism development, tourism policy development and its challenges in Rotterdam through the lens of “new urban tourism”, reviewing the relevance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss tourism development, tourism policy development and its challenges in Rotterdam through the lens of “new urban tourism”, reviewing the relevance of the concept.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comprises a review of the concept of new urban tourism and a case study of Rotterdam. Methods used include a literature review and social media search, an analysis of policy documents and street interviews.

Findings

Tourism in Rotterdam has grown rapidly, exhibiting aspects of new urban tourism such as encounters with the ordinary and everydayness, authenticity and de-differentiation. Details about tourism motives and nature of tourism are unknown. It is concluded that the concept of new urban tourism is a rather elusive and difficult notion to apply to the case of Rotterdam.

Research limitations/implications

This research is a case study of one city.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that different tourism information and statistics are needed for policymaking and for understanding urban tourism.

Originality/value

The Rotterdam case raises new questions about new urban tourism, as the concept appears to be rather indefinable.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Gert‐Jan Hospers and Roy van Dalm

The paper aims to explore to what extent policy makers can create a “creative city”, that is, an urban environment capable of generating creativity, innovation and thus

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore to what extent policy makers can create a “creative city”, that is, an urban environment capable of generating creativity, innovation and thus economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is set up as an interview with Richard Florida and his mentor Jane Jacobs, two of today's most famous specialists on urban development.

Findings

The main conclusion from the double interview is that a creative city cannot be built from scratch; however, both Florida and Jacobs argue that it is still possible to build for the creative city.

Research limitations/implications

The paper documents the viewpoints of just two urban specialists whose original views, however, have influenced and will influence the debate on creative cities.

Practical implications

The interviewees in this paper offer illuminating insights and practical clues for policy makers wanting to contribute to the development of a creative city.

Originality/value

This is the first double interview with Florida and Jacobs offering policy advice in the field of creative cities. The paper also shows that the views of both authors are complementary.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Mimi Tresman, Edna Pásher and Francesco Molinari

The purpose of this paper is to address the importance of conversing within cities, organizations and beyond, in order to adapt to the rapidly changing environment and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the importance of conversing within cities, organizations and beyond, in order to adapt to the rapidly changing environment and promote co‐operation, participation and with special reference to European cities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings examples and case studies of how the concepts of conversing cities has been and is being integrated into existing cities focusing on the future – youth, employment, education and quality of live as essential factors for the future prosperity of cities.

Findings

With the rapid changes in society, economy and technology, not only business organizations need to adapt to the new reality but also cities. Conversing is an important part of adaptation – communicating, making contact, networking, sharing ideas, creating new knowledge.

Originality/value

This article shows how interactions which have been formulated for organizations (businesses) can be relevant and essential to cities as living and changing units and shows how conversing cities have benefited and prospered.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Elaine Carmichael

The Barbican Library is the headquarters of the City of London's lending library service. It includes a music library and a children's library as well as a special section…

Abstract

The Barbican Library is the headquarters of the City of London's lending library service. It includes a music library and a children's library as well as a special section devoted to the fine and performing arts. Anyone who lives, works or studies in the City may apply to be a member. Others who wish to join may do so under the interavailability scheme.

Details

Library Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

Details

Logistics Systems for Sustainable Cities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044260-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Siu Loon Hoe

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key characteristics and propose a working definition of a smart nation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key characteristics and propose a working definition of a smart nation.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of Singapore through an analysis of the key speeches made by senior Singapore leaders, publicly available government documents and news reports since the launch of the smart nation initiative in December 2014 was carried out.

Findings

Just like smart cities, the idea of a smart nation is an evolving concept. However, there are some emerging characteristics that define a smart nation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides an initial understanding of the key characteristics and definition of a smart nation at the nascent stage and a foundation for further research on the topic.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing smart cities and smart nation literature by providing insights to the key characteristics of smart nation and proposing a working definition of the term.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Tom Bason and Jonathan Grix

In recent years, there has been a decline in the number of cities seeking to host the Olympic Games, with several cities withdrawing from the bid process following…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, there has been a decline in the number of cities seeking to host the Olympic Games, with several cities withdrawing from the bid process following referenda. The debate around bidding have hinged on the costs and benefits of hosting events, with little consideration as to the benefits of a bid itself. The purpose of this paper is to identify the ways in which Olympic bids be leveraged for positive outcomes, regardless of the outcomes of the bid.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs a content analysis, examining the 16 bid responses to the question in the International Olympic Committee Candidate questionnaire: “What will be the benefits of bidding for the Olympic Games for your city/region, irrespective of the outcome of the bid?”.

Findings

This research found that bid cities do attempt to use the Olympic bid process as a leveraging resource, with four unique opportunities arising from this; national and city pride, Olympism, the formation of networks, and global focus. These provide the opportunities for Olympic bid cities to achieve the following strategic objectives: nation and community building, sport participation, business opportunities, enhancing image and profile, and to push through infrastructural projects.

Originality/value

There has been little consideration as to the ways an Olympic bid can be used to leverage positive outcomes for a city or a nation, and therefore this research contributes to the literature on leveraging mega-events. The research also has practical value, in providing potential bidders with information regarding positive outcomes whether the bid is successful or not.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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