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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Ann Lahiff, Junmin Li, Lorna Unwin, Lea Zenner-Höffkes and Matthias Pilz

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the comparative research literature on vocational education and training (VET) and skill formation systems. It examines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a gap in the comparative research literature on vocational education and training (VET) and skill formation systems. It examines the impact of international technical standardisation and regulation on the design, organisation and delivery of apprenticeships in the aeronautical and aerospace sectors in England and Germany.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was informed by insights from economics, workplace and work-based learning and comparative education. Academic experts in the fields of aerospace and aeronautical standardisation and regulation, VET, human resource development and business organisation were consulted. The generic occupation of “aircraft mechanic” was selected as being the closest match for comparison. Interviews and non-participant observation in workplaces and training centres were carried out involving three companies in England and four in Germany.

Findings

Findings show that there is considerable convergence across the pedagogical approaches to apprenticeships in England and Germany related to fostering the capacity to take responsibility for the quality of one’s work, to work in and lead teams, and to respond to and work with customers. Increasing international regulation and technical standardisation underpins a shared language about learning through practice in technologically advanced workplaces.

Originality/value

This paper is original because it turns the lens of inquiry to workplace processes to reveal the level of convergence in training philosophies and practices in an internationally highly regulated sector. It shows how international technical standardisation and regulation is leading to pedagogical innovation. The findings have implications for VET and apprenticeship policy at the national and international level.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Matthias Pilz and Junmin Li

This paper aims to focus on the vocational and training behaviours of German corporations at their subsidiaries in the USA, China and India. Although all three countries…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the vocational and training behaviours of German corporations at their subsidiaries in the USA, China and India. Although all three countries are important markets for Germany, they are characterised by very different cultures, vocational education and training (VET) systems and employment systems. The transfer of the German VET system to other countries has been the topic of discussion and controversy.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors rely on interviews with local training experts of German subsidiaries to analyse VET activities. Their analysis is based on convergence (standardisation) versus divergence (localisation) theory borrowed from approaches in international management studies.

Findings

The findings indicate a “localisation” effect in all three nations. The similarities can be explained partially by the stronger focus on off-the-job trainings and greater preferences for academic careers.

Research limitations/implications

The study is a pilot study.

Practical implications

The transfer of the German VET system to other countries seems to be very difficult.

Originality/value

Beyond this general debate, the specialist literature pays virtually no attention to the training practices of German companies abroad. The authors have tried to fill this research gap.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2009

Doug Guthrie, Zhixing Xiao and Junmin Wang

In the spring of 1995, the Electronics Bureau of Shanghai [Shanghai Dianziju] changed its name to “Shanghai Electronics State-Owned Asset Management Company” [Shanghai

Abstract

In the spring of 1995, the Electronics Bureau of Shanghai [Shanghai Dianziju] changed its name to “Shanghai Electronics State-Owned Asset Management Company” [Shanghai dianzi guoyou zichan jingying gongsi]. As one official in the former Bureau explained, it had changed its name and its function: It was no longer set up to “govern” or “manage” [guan] Shanghai's electronics sector; instead it was now an asset management company whose function was to manage the assets of the firms that it owned.1 At the time, the transformation seemed purely cosmetic. Calling itself an asset management company instead of a government bureau was one thing, but actually acting like an asset management company was quite another. Would firms under this former Bureau be any more productive as a result of the change? Would the work-life experiences of the people actually working in these firms change at all as a result?

Details

Work and Organizationsin China Afterthirty Years of Transition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-730-7

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Jun Wu, Yingli Pan and Qi Zhu

– The purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants for currency internationalization and forecast the potential of RMB as an international reserve currency.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants for currency internationalization and forecast the potential of RMB as an international reserve currency.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs linear or non-linear regressions of the shares of eight major international reserve currencies as the reserve assets in global central banks on the macro economic and financial variables of their corresponding countries to identify the determinants for their international positions, and conducts an “counter-factual simulation” for the potential of RMB as an international reserve currency.

Findings

This paper finds that the economic size and the “network externalities” are the most important determinants for the international status of a reserve currency; that exchange rate volatility has negative impacts; the conditions for the RMB internationalization are basically available. The simulation for the potential of RMB as an international reserve currency reveals that the international role of RMB could surpass that of the Japanese Yen and the British Pound, and get close to Euro in the coming 15 years. Based on the empirical evidence, this paper suggests a promoting strategy for RMB internationalization.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has not taken the influence of economic systemic and political factors on the process of RMB internationalization into account.

Practical implications

RMB internationalization promotion should follow the strategy of “stably create RMB international demand in the initial period and dramatically release the RMB overseas supply in the latter period” in the coming 15 years.

Originality/value

The conclusions and policy implications are from the results of the empirical analysis on the 45-year historical experience on the eight main international currencies.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Zhe Wang, Xisheng Li, Xiaojuan Zhang, Yanru Bai and Chengcai Zheng

The purpose of this study is to use visual and inertial sensors to achieve real-time location. How to provide an accurate location has become a popular research topic in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to use visual and inertial sensors to achieve real-time location. How to provide an accurate location has become a popular research topic in the field of indoor navigation. Although the complementarity of vision and inertia has been widely applied in indoor navigation, many problems remain, such as inertial sensor deviation calibration, unsynchronized visual and inertial data acquisition and large amount of stored data.

Design/methodology/approach

First, this study demonstrates that the vanishing point (VP) evaluation function improves the precision of extraction, and the nearest ground corner point (NGCP) of the adjacent frame is estimated by pre-integrating the inertial sensor. The Sequential Similarity Detection Algorithm (SSDA) and Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) algorithms are adopted to accurately match the adjacent NGCP in the estimated region of interest. Second, the model of visual pose is established by using the parameters of the camera itself, VP and NGCP. The model of inertial pose is established by pre-integrating. Third, location is calculated by fusing the model of vision and inertia.

Findings

In this paper, a novel method is proposed to fuse visual and inertial sensor to locate indoor environment. The authors describe the building of an embedded hardware platform to the best of their knowledge and compare the result with a mature method and POSAV310.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a VP evaluation function that is used to extract the most advantages in the intersection of a plurality of parallel lines. To improve the extraction speed of adjacent frame, the authors first proposed fusing the NGCP of the current frame and the calibrated pre-integration to estimate the NGCP of the next frame. The visual pose model was established using extinction VP and NGCP, calibration of inertial sensor. This theory offers the linear processing equation of gyroscope and accelerometer by the model of visual and inertial pose.

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