Search results

1 – 10 of 19
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, John Milliman and Anthony Lucas

This paper aims to explore the sequential effects of employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR), organizational identification (OI), higher-order…

3423

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the sequential effects of employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR), organizational identification (OI), higher-order quality-of-work-life (HQWL) and intention to stay (IS).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey responses were gathered from employees of a casino hotel company in the USA. All hypotheses were tested via structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results demonstrated that ethical and philanthropic CSR dimensions had significant direct effects on OI and indirect effects on HQWL via OI. OI had positive effects on HQWL (directly) and IS (directly and indirectly via HQWL). Both ethical and philanthropic CSR dimensions indirectly influenced IS via OI and HQWL, while economic CSR had a significant indirect effect on IS via HQWL.

Research limitations/implications

This study addressed the lack of theory-driven empirical work on the relationship between CSR and employee retention by presenting new insights into how different dimensions of CSR can contribute for improving employee HQWL and IS via OI based on social identity theory (SIT) and social exchange theory (SET). In this study, the results may not generalize to other countries and cultures because the data arises from a casino hotel in the USA.

Practical implications

Based on the results, hospitality companies can improve employee OI, HQWL and IS by more effectively implementing different types of CSR programs.

Originality/value

This study provided support for the positive influence of CSR initiatives on hospitality employees in a controversial sector (i.e. casino hotels) in which there is a lack of empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, Sungsik Yoon and Dina Marie V. Zemke

The purpose of this study is to investigate the determinants of customers’ intentions to use location-based services (LBS) offered by a hotel. The study examined whether hotel…

1087

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the determinants of customers’ intentions to use location-based services (LBS) offered by a hotel. The study examined whether hotel customers’ coupon proneness, trust, privacy concerns and familiarity with LBS are significant determinants of their intentions to use LBS.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey using a scenario-based narrative was administered to collect data from participants who have smartphones and have stayed at a full-service hotel within the previous 12 months. A research model tested data collected from 402 hotel customers, using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

Three proposed determinants (i.e. familiarity, coupon proneness and trust) positively influenced customers’ intentions to use LBS. Out of the four dimensions of privacy concerns (concerns of collection, error, unauthorized secondary use and improper access), only concerns about data collection negatively influenced customers’ intentions to use a hotel’s LBS.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on LBS adoption and other technology with privacy issues by modifying existing models and empirically testing it in the new context of hotels.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and Kweisi Ausar

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the perceived ease of use and the usefulness of a virtual employee engagement platform (VEEP) positively influence employees’…

3399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the perceived ease of use and the usefulness of a virtual employee engagement platform (VEEP) positively influence employees’ intentions to use the VEEP and, in turn, actual use of VEEP. This study further examined how using the VEEP influences employee engagement as well as two organizational outcomes (i.e. employee participation and intention to stay).

Design/methodology/approach

The survey items for this study were developed based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) and motivation theory. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the proposed relationships in a sample of 373 employees of a hospitality organization in the USA.

Findings

The results indicate that employees’ perceived ease of use and usefulness of a hospitality company’s VEEP positively influence employees’ intentions to use the VEEP. The study also found employees with greater intentions to use their company’s VEEP tend to use the VEEP more frequently, which in turn positively influenced their engagement. Eventually, the more-engaged employees showed a higher level of participation, as well as intention to stay.

Practical implications

This study addresses the call by researchers to demonstrate how a VEEP can positively influence employee engagement and to present new insights into how employee engagement can contribute to improving organizational outcomes in a hospitality setting.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical study involving the emergent field of engagement platforms and employee engagement in a hospitality setting. Moreover, this research provides support for increased adoption and investment in the VEEP by hospitality companies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2023

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, Mehmet Erdem and Boran Kim

The purpose of this study is to explore whether five factors drawn from the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) and UTAUT2 significantly influence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore whether five factors drawn from the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) and UTAUT2 significantly influence customers' intention to use hotel in-room voice assistants (VAs). It further examined culture as a moderator of the relationships between the five factors and customers' intention to use.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from US and Singapore to examine cultural differences in customer acceptance of in-room VAs. All hypotheses were tested via structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis.

Findings

The results showed that performance expectancy, social influence and hedonic motivation significantly affected customers' intentions to use in-room VAs, while effort expectancy and facilitating conditions did not. The results confirmed that culture did not play a substantial role in moderating the relationships between these factors and intentions to use.

Research limitations/implications

This study established that the instrument and structural paths in the research model were equivalent across two samples from different countries. The findings may not generalize to other countries as the data arises from customers in the US and Singapore.

Practical implications

The findings provide important implications for hotel operators and vendors seeking to enhance customer acceptance of in-room voice technology.

Originality/value

This study addresses the gaps of extant research by developing and testing a research model to better understand the influential factors of in-room VA adoption within the hotel domain.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 June 2022

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, SungJun Joe and Mehmet Erdem

This study examined the antecedents of technostressors as well as how customers' perceived convenience and technostressors of using a check-in/out kiosk influence their behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the antecedents of technostressors as well as how customers' perceived convenience and technostressors of using a check-in/out kiosk influence their behavioral intention in a full-service hotel setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 630 hotel customers, hypotheses were tested via structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis.

Findings

The results showed that perceived usefulness of a check-in/out kiosk had direct effects on both technostressors (i.e. work overload and role ambiguity), and that perceived ease-of-use had indirect effects on the technostressors, via perceived usefulness. The findings showed that both role ambiguity and perceived convenience significantly influenced intention to use a check-in/out kiosk. Intention to use was positively associated with intention to revisit a hotel providing the kiosk. These findings were equivalent across the younger and older groups.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, hotels can implement effective strategies to reduce technostressors associated with a check-in/out kiosk and focus on enhancing the factors that influence customer acceptance of the system. This is especially important given the increased emphasis on self-service technology since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This research contributed to the relevant literature by developing a check-in/out kiosk acceptance model using a multi-theoretical approach, and empirically testing it within the full-service hotel domain. It fills the knowledge gap regarding the antecedents and outcomes of technostressors in the hospitality research literature by providing empirical evidence.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and Anthony Gatling

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of three person-environment (PE) fit dimensions (i.e. person-job, person-organizational and person-technology [PT] fit) on…

1047

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of three person-environment (PE) fit dimensions (i.e. person-job, person-organizational and person-technology [PT] fit) on employees’ engagement and service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) dimensions (i.e. loyalty, service delivery and participation).

Design/methodology/approach

Both online and on-site surveys were used to collect data from customer-contact employees working at a resort-style hotel in the USA. A total of 290 complete responses were collected, and the results were analyzed using a confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results revealed that the three PE fit dimensions positively influenced employee engagement. The results also showed that the three PE fit dimensions had significant indirect effects on the three OCB dimensions via engagement, except for the relationship between PT fit and participation. PT fit only had a significant direct effect on participation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the current PE fit, engagement and OCB literature by adding PT fit and testing the effects of the three PE fit dimensions on service-oriented OCB via engagement. This study recommends that hospitality companies develop strategies and tactics to improve their employees’ PE fit and engagement because they are the key determinants of service-oriented OCB.

研究目的

本论文旨在检验三种人-环境(PE)合适度维度(即人-工作 人-组织 人-科技)对员工参与和以服务为本的组织公民行为(OCB)维度(如忠诚度 服务传递 和参与)的影响。

研究设计/方法/途径

研究采样通过线上和线下问卷, 样本包括与顾客接触的在美国度假村式酒店工作的员工。样本数量为290份。研究分析方法包括验证性分子分析和结构方程模型。

研究结果

研究结果表明三种 PE 合适度维度对员工参与有积极影响。研究结果还表明三种PE合适度维度通过员工参与变量对三种 OCB 的维度有显著影响, 除了 PT 与参与之间的关系外。PT 合适度只对参与有显著直接影响。

研究原创性/价值

本论文对目前有关PE合适度 员工参与 和OCB文献有着显著贡献, 其增添了PT合适度, 还检验了三种PE合适度维度对服务为本OCB通过员工参与变量的间接影响。本论文推荐酒店业相关企业应该制定政策和方针来提高员工PE合适度, 因为 PE 合适度是服务为本OCB变量的关键维度。

关键词:人-环境合适度 人-工作合适度, 人-组织合适度 人-科技合适度 员工参与 以服务为本的组织公民行为(OCB)

纸张类型

研究论文

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim

This paper aims to examine whether a customer’s perceptions of hotel tablet apps serve as determinants of customers’ behavioral intention in terms of the app’s ease of use…

5885

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether a customer’s perceptions of hotel tablet apps serve as determinants of customers’ behavioral intention in terms of the app’s ease of use, usefulness, credibility and subjective norm. It also explored age and gender as moderators of the relationships between these determinants and customers’ behavioral intention as well as customers’ likelihood of using specific app functions across age and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model, grounded in the technology acceptance model (TAM), used data collected from 751 hotel customers in the USA. The model was tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results showed that three of the four proposed determinants positively influenced customers’ behavioral intention toward hotel tablet apps. Neither gender nor age played significant moderating roles in the relationships between the four determinants and the behavioral intention. The study also revealed age- and gender-related differences in preferences for specific hotel tablet app functions.

Practical implications

This study helps operators successfully plan for investing in and implementing hotel apps. It assists operators in developing effective marketing strategies by understanding factors influencing customers’ app adoption and between group differences in their preferences on app functions.

Originality/value

This is the first tablet app adoption study that extends TAM to the hotel industry. Thus, it extends the literature on technology adoption by exploring both existing and new variables and testing them in a new context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2022

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim, Andrew Hardin and Samuel Lee

When organizations implement a new information system (IS), they often experience users' resistance behaviors. This study explored the effects of IS self-efficacy, perceived ease…

Abstract

Purpose

When organizations implement a new information system (IS), they often experience users' resistance behaviors. This study explored the effects of IS self-efficacy, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and anxiety on resistance to IS change within the hospitality domain. It also compared these relationships before and after completing e-learning courses for a new IS.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses were gathered from current and future hospitality employees. All hypotheses were tested via confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results demonstrated that (1) IS self-efficacy had significant effects on both perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of IS; and (2) IS anxiety had a significant impact on resistance to IS change, both before and after completing the e-learning courses. The results also showed that self-efficacy had a significant effect on anxiety and, in turn, resistance to change, after completing the e-learning courses, but not prior to the training.

Research limitations/implications

This study addressed the lack of theory-driven empirical research on predictors of user resistance to IS change, based on social cognitive theory, technology acceptance models, and user resistance research.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, hospitality operators and vendors can focus on improving factors influencing user adoption of a new IS when they design and implement it. Operators can design better change management strategies to reduce resistance to IS change.

Originality/value

Few investigations have been conducted to explain the relationships among the aforementioned factors, before and after completing e-learning for a hospitality IS.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Anthony Gatling, Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and John Milliman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which workplace spirituality (WPS) is related to hospitality supervisors’ organizational commitment (OC) and intention to…

3013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which workplace spirituality (WPS) is related to hospitality supervisors’ organizational commitment (OC) and intention to quit (ITQ), examined through the lens of self-determination theory (SDT).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on survey data collected from 190 supervisors employed by a large US hospitality organization, the relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis, second-order factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that three dimensions of WPS (i.e. meaning and purpose in their work, sense of community and alignment with organizational values) are positively related to OC and negatively related to ITQ. Moreover, these supervisors’ OC fully mediates the negative relationship of WPS to ITQ.

Research limitations/implications

This study tests the validity and reliability of three WPS dimensions in the hospitality environment. It also provides a theoretical perspective through SDT for explaining how WPS impacts employee work attitudes, which can be used to guide future studies.

Practical implications

Hospitality organizations can benefit from the insights of this research into how WPS can increase the commitment and retention of supervisors, who in turn positively impact front-line workers and customer service quality delivery.

Originality/value

This study provides additional implications for SDT and offers new insights into the emerging field of WPS scholarship. While other studies have tested relationships related to involving these WPS variables, a scarcity of research has been offered in hospitality or with a theory-based explanation of these relationships.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and Murat Kizildag

This paper aims to explore whether there is a need for a mobile learning (M‐learning) system and what types of mobile applications will be appropriate for each department at a…

2640

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore whether there is a need for a mobile learning (M‐learning) system and what types of mobile applications will be appropriate for each department at a hotel. It focuses on addressing three key questions: how can a hotel utilize mobile devices for training purposes in each area? What kinds of features or functions would hotel employees like to see on the mobile device? Are there any differences in the M‐learning acceptance level of the participants based on their demographic factors or previous experience with mobile usage?

Design/methodology/approach

Ten experts in the hospitality academia and industry participated in this qualitative research. This study used snowball sampling as a selection strategy.

Findings

This study found there are various ways to utilize mobile devices for hotel employee training in different departments. Housekeeping, room service, restaurant, and other customer‐service sectors were suggested as good areas to use mobile devices for training. Beyond this suggestion about proper departments for M‐learning, this study uncovered a number of interesting applications for each department.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study conducted in a research area where a few scholarly works exist. Since this study uses a qualitative approach, future research should conduct an experimental study or a survey with hotel major students or hotel employees to obtain more generalizable results.

Originality/value

As the literature review reveals, very few studies have investigated the M‐learning adoption and even fewer studies have empirically tested an individual's perceptions that can explain the adoption of mobile devices for hotel employee training. This study develops a research framework and suggests appropriate determinants of M‐learning adoption for future studies.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

1 – 10 of 19