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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Philip A. Street and June M. Fernie

Very little research is available to help companies which are considering attaining BS 5750. The information that is available tends to be somewhat biased, either coming…

Abstract

Very little research is available to help companies which are considering attaining BS 5750. The information that is available tends to be somewhat biased, either coming from the auditing organization, such as BSI, or a consultancy that is in the business of helping companies to achieve this standard. Offers an analysis of both why companies decide to go for the standard in the first place as well as what they hope to achieve. Examines such thorny issues as audit frequency as well as the need to implement additional supporting programmes in order to cement the standard into the culture of the organization.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Philip A. Street and June M. Fernie

The number of companies becoming registered to BS5750, the UK national standard for quality systems, has grown dramatically, yet little formal research has been undertaken…

Abstract

The number of companies becoming registered to BS5750, the UK national standard for quality systems, has grown dramatically, yet little formal research has been undertaken in the area. The objective of the present study was to determine the view of Scottish manufacturing companies of BS 5750, its benefits and the problem areas associated with it. Questionnaires were sent to 80 companies currently registered to BS 5750 Part 1, 2 or 3. These were randomly selected from the 1990 Scottish Development Agency Register of Quality Assessed Companies, and covered a broad spectrum in terms of size and type of business. A 65 per cent response rate was achieved. Key findings were as follows. Not all of the benefits of BS5750 put forward by the British Standards Institution are being realized in practice, the principal ones are in relation to better company image and increased quality awareness among employees. Sixty‐two per cent of companies believed registration had resulted in significantly higher administration burdens and 70 per cent believed that these would act as a barrier for smaller companies wishing to register. Registration had not removed the need for additional audits by customers: furthermore, 49 per cent of companies were dissatisfied with the external auditing by accredited bodies.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Md Nuruzzaman

The objective of this study is to investigate how country risk, different political actions from the government and bureaucratic behavior influence the activities in…

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate how country risk, different political actions from the government and bureaucratic behavior influence the activities in industry supply chains (SCs) in emerging markets. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of these external stakeholders’ elements to the demand-side and supply-side drivers and barriers for improving competitiveness of Ready-Made Garment (RMG) industry in the way of analyzing supply chain. Considering the phenomenon of recent change in the RMG business environment and the competitiveness issues this study uses the principles of stakeholder and resource dependence theory and aims to find out some factors which influence to make an efficient supply chain for improving competitiveness. The RMG industry of Bangladesh is the case application of this study. Following a positivist paradigm, this study adopts a two phase sequential mixed-method research design consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. Qualitative field study is then carried out to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. A survey is carried out with sample of top and middle level executives of different garment companies of Dhaka city in Bangladesh and the collected quantitative data are analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling. The findings support eight hypotheses. From the analysis the external stakeholders’ elements like bureaucratic behavior and country risk have significant influence to the barriers. From the internal stakeholders’ point of view the manufacturers’ and buyers’ drivers have significant influence on the competitiveness. Therefore, stakeholders need to take proper action to reduce the barriers and increase the drivers, as the drivers have positive influence to improve competitiveness.

This study has both theoretical and practical contributions. This study represents an important contribution to the theory by integrating two theoretical perceptions to identify factors of the RMG industry’s SC that affect the competitiveness of the RMG industry. This research study contributes to the understanding of both external and internal stakeholders of national and international perspectives in the RMG (textile and clothing) business. It combines the insights of stakeholder and resource dependence theories along with the concept of the SC in improving effectiveness. In a practical sense, this study certainly contributes to the Bangladeshi RMG industry. In accordance with the desire of the RMG manufacturers, the research has shown that some influential constructs of the RMG industry’s SC affect the competitiveness of the RMG industry. The outcome of the study is useful for various stakeholders of the Bangladeshi RMG industry sector ranging from the government to various private organizations. The applications of this study are extendable through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

John Fernie and Stephen J. Arnold

Wal‐Mart is the world’s largest retailer with ambitious plans to increase its international sales. Europe is a logical target for Wal‐Mart to consolidate and build upon…

Abstract

Wal‐Mart is the world’s largest retailer with ambitious plans to increase its international sales. Europe is a logical target for Wal‐Mart to consolidate and build upon acquisitions in Germany and the UK. This paper assesses the opportunities for Wal‐Mart in these markets and in France, which has the highest level of sales through food retailers in Europe. While Wal‐Mart has made an impact in both Germany and the UK, it has not been as successful as originally envisaged. Moreover, its growth aspirations have been frustrated by the difficulty in making further acquisitions in Germany and France because of the nature of ownership of targeted companies.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

John Fernie

Distribution has been a major element of retailers′ marketingstrategy in recent years as companies strive to control costs but at thesame time seek competitive advantage…

Abstract

Distribution has been a major element of retailers′ marketing strategy in recent years as companies strive to control costs but at the same time seek competitive advantage through improving service to stores and gaining greater control of stock in the supply chain. In an interview survey of distribution directors from major multiple groups, all companies were reviewing their distribution strategy and many had made major changes to their distribution system. Centralisation of stock in strategically located RDCs and the use of third party contractors were main features of retail companies′ strategy. Contractors were much more aggressive in marketing their services to retailers than hitherto. This is partly related to the competitive and turbulent nature of the industry. In a survey of marketing directors/managers of distribution companies, it was clear that firms were trying to raise their profile in the market as they “went public” and/or because they were moving into new industry sectors away from their “core” specialist areas.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

John Fernie and David B. Grant

On‐shelf availability (OSA) has been a major cause of concern to UK grocery retailers over the last five years and the topic has been the focus of commissioned research…

Abstract

Purpose

On‐shelf availability (OSA) has been a major cause of concern to UK grocery retailers over the last five years and the topic has been the focus of commissioned research reports by various trade associations. The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of how one major grocery retailer tackled the OSA issue that had been exacerbated by management focus on new technology and distribution facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of the research was to determine if any relationship existed between OSA and store picking for home shoppers, OSA and promotions and OSA and store size. This paper discusses the academic and practitioner literature on OSA and out‐of‐stocks (OOS) and then presents a single company, in‐depth case study of one multiple grocery retailer. Primary research was undertaken with senior managers of the company but also at regional distribution centre (RDC) and store level to chart how new logistics strategies were implemented at an operational level in Scottish stores.

Findings

It was noted that the advent of home shopping has aggravated the “last 50 yards” and a company can experience acute OSA difficulties. Network changes involving a mixture of old and new systems create short‐term pressures and profitability shortfalls. The new high‐tech networks push products out to stores but overstocks occur in backrooms of stores and do not reach the shelves. Demand and supply may not synchronised.

Research limitations/implications

Although there is primary empirical research related to the case study the major output is a framework presented for future investigation, thus there is no expansive empirical study in this paper.

Practical implications

With the exception of smaller stores where OSA remains a problem, the company has succeeded in improving OSA levels in the other areas.

Originality/value

This paper adds to our knowledge of OSA and OOS by investigating the flow of goods from the RDC to the store shelf and presenting various critical points in the process flow that have received scant attention from academics and practitioners.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Neil Wrigley

Within a context of the globalization of retailing, examines the current structure of pan‐European food retail consolidation. Portrays the interlinkages between firms in…

Abstract

Within a context of the globalization of retailing, examines the current structure of pan‐European food retail consolidation. Portrays the interlinkages between firms in the EU food retail market, and offers an assessment of the three leading consolidators (Carrefour, Wal‐Mart, Ahold) in that market. Considers potential acquisition/merger targets in France and the UK, and conceptualizes the future process of consolidation as a struggle between competing models of globalized retail operation. Assesses the strengths and weaknesses of those models.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

John Fernie

Electronic‐retailing is the buzzword of 2000. Every other press release I receive relates to electronic commerce or Internet shopping. Therefore, it seems appropriate to…

Abstract

Electronic‐retailing is the buzzword of 2000. Every other press release I receive relates to electronic commerce or Internet shopping. Therefore, it seems appropriate to focus this summer issue of Retail Insights on the subject. The first article by Rowley discusses the phenomenon of shopping bots, the intelligent agents designed to support comparison shopping across a number of Internet sites. She reviews the functions and evaluates the coverage of different shopping bots. In the second article, Wee and Ramachandra assess the level of cyberbuying activities in China, Hong Kong and Singapore by concentrating on the who, why and what of online retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

John Fernie and Suzanne I. Fernie

It is not uncommon for the USA to be the origin of innovative retail formats. In recent years in the UK, the most recent retail out‐of‐town developments have their roots…

Abstract

It is not uncommon for the USA to be the origin of innovative retail formats. In recent years in the UK, the most recent retail out‐of‐town developments have their roots in the USA, most notably warehouse clubs and factory outlet centres. Charts the growth of one of these formats, factory outlet centres, in the UK and discusses the prospects for development potential in other European markets. Semi‐structured interviews were carried out with major developers and development consultancies to ascertain the type of strategies pursued, the locational criteria for site selection, the role of tenants in this process and the degree of customization or standardization of the format in market entry strategies. Although the UK appeared to offer US developers the best opportunity for market penetration, planning policy has progressively worked against the development of this retail format. It is unlikely that any more than seven to eight US‐style factory outlet centres will be built out of a total of 26 developments by 2001. There has been a considerable downsizing of initial proposals, with the creation of smaller, more downmarket centres than in the USA. US developers have been forced to seek sites in the rest of Europe much earlier than originally intended. Their strategies have differed from the standardized, upmarket brand character of one operator compared with a more customized approach adopted by the market leader.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Beverly A. Wagner, Ian Fillis and Ulf Johansson

The overall aim of this research was to undertake an exploratory investigation to gain insights into attitudes and perceptions of supplier development and local sourcing…

Abstract

Purpose

The overall aim of this research was to undertake an exploratory investigation to gain insights into attitudes and perceptions of supplier development and local sourcing programmes in the UK grocery retail sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Since this research is exploratory in nature, a qualitative approach to data collection was undertaken using semi‐structured in‐depth interviews.

Findings

Retailers do seem to be undertaking supplier development as defined in the literature but the data collected highlights some of the difficulties experienced by all suppliers in supporting grocery retailer category management and branding strategies. From this, local sourcing also implies the involvement of the micro‐enterprise producer. This has the potential for greater levels of power and trust imbalance.

Research limitations/implications

The main research limitation was the small sample size. However, the research was exploratory and the sample was essentially convenience based. This resulted in over‐representation by the larger SME producer. The findings can be enhanced with further qualitative research focusing on the micro‐enterprise supplier.

Originality/value

The paper offers an insight into the debate on SME supplier development and local sourcing by providing empirical evidence of the current shape and scope of the various initiatives in the UK grocery sector.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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