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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Junaidah Hashim

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not performance of employees is determined by merit of their academic excellence, which is measured by cumulative grade…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not performance of employees is determined by merit of their academic excellence, which is measured by cumulative grade point average (CGPA). This paper thus attempts to measure the variables that could possibly influence employees’ performance, such as job satisfaction, motivation and involvement in co‐curriculum activities.

Design/methodology/approach

An adapted version of the questionnaire used by Sarmiento et al. was utilised to assess the perceived performance of employees. Ability construct was measured in terms of employee academic qualification and skills. A 13‐item scale based on Porter was used to measure motivation. A 14‐item scale based on Hackman and Oldham's Job Diagnostic Survey was used to measure job satisfaction. In total, 340 respondents from 87 companies participated in this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that there is a weak relationship between employees’ performance with CGPA. The findings also revealed that there is a weak relationship between employees’ performance and their job satisfaction, motivation and ability.

Research limitations/implications

It would be meaningful for future research if actual performance appraisal report could be obtained.

Practical implications

Company policy makers need to provide a wider employment opportunity to everyone and not merely to candidates based on merit of their academic excellence. Many graduates may be missing out on employment opportunities while they may be the right candidates.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates that academic excellence, which is the main selection criterion used by most employers, is not a determinant of employees’ performance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Junaidah Hashim and Saodah Wok

This study aims to measure the effectiveness of training schemes and levy utilization in terms of cognitive gain and skills changes through increased knowledge and skills…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the effectiveness of training schemes and levy utilization in terms of cognitive gain and skills changes through increased knowledge and skills intensity to improve job performance among large companies and SMEs in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed questionnaires as the instrument for data collection. The questionnaire was used to gather relevant information on the effectiveness of training schemes and levy utilization among companies registered under Human Resource Development Fund (HRDF).

Findings

The result of this study illustrates that the training schemes have been found to be effective in increasing the employees' knowledge and skills, as well as improving the companies' performance. SMEs' performance was better off than the large companies' after receiving the training scheme.

Research limitations/implications

Encouraging SMEs to provide training has been problematic owing to the absence of empirical data to support a causal relationship between training and business success. The present study reduces this knowledge by providing empirical data on the positive outcomes experienced by SMEs participated in various training schemes.

Originality/value

This study was conducted on prominent government‐funded training schemes in Malaysia. No previous study has been conducted on these government‐funded training schemes.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Arif Hassan and Junaidah Hashim

The study aims to analyze the differences between national and expatriate academic staff perception of organizational justice in Malaysian institutions of higher learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to analyze the differences between national and expatriate academic staff perception of organizational justice in Malaysian institutions of higher learning. It also explores the role of organizational justice in shaping teaching faculties' attitude (job satisfaction and commitment) and behavioral intention (turnover intention).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of teaching staff belonging to several faculties drawn from four public universities in Malaysia. Sample was divided into two groups – Malaysian nationals with tenure appointments and expatriates with contractual appointments. Data were collected using standardized tools to measure the study variables.

Findings

Except for job satisfaction, where Malaysians recorded significantly higher endorsement compared to expatriates, no significant difference was found between the two groups on perception of distributive, procedural, and interactional aspects of organizational justice, as well as organizational commitment and turnover intention. However, Malaysians demonstrated significantly higher level of job satisfaction compared to expatriates. Different facets of organizational justice predicted work outcomes in the two groups. Whereas interactional and distributive justice promoted expatriates' organizational commitment and/or intention to stay with the organization, it was mainly procedural justice that contributed to local employees' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions. Distributive justice also predicted turnover intentions of locals.

Practical implications

The study should add to the literature on international human resource management. Organizations that employ expatriates and knowledge workers should benefit from the findings of this study.

Originality/value

Not many empirical studies have been conducted on university academic staffs' perception of organizational justice in an Asian context, as well as how employment practices might influence justice perception and resultant work outcomes of national citizens vs expatriates. This study attempts to fulfill the gap.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Junaidah Hashim

Islam urges all Muslims to perform their utmost best when they work. Giving the best requires full commitment. Employees' commitment is influenced by many factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Islam urges all Muslims to perform their utmost best when they work. Giving the best requires full commitment. Employees' commitment is influenced by many factors, including the management styles within the organisation. This paper aims to examine the management of human resources from the Islamic perspective and its effects on organisational commitment among selected employees in Islamic organisations in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a self‐developed questionnaire that was personally distributed to employees. In total, 121 Muslim employees who work in various positions in eight Islamic organisations participated as respondents of this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that the selected organisations frequently practise the Islamic approach in all its human resource management (HRM) functions. The results of correlation and regression analysis show that the Islamic approach in HRM was highly and significantly correlated to organisational commitment. About 45 per cent of the organisational commitment variance was explained by the Islamic approach in HRM.

Practical implications

An introduction to the Islamic approach in HRM practices is an initial attempt to provide managers with an effective way of managing and understanding the people they work with. This knowledge would be useful to even non‐Muslim managers. For Muslim human resource managers, it is essential for them to not only know but also to apply the Islamic approach in managing employees. Non‐Muslim managers will have a better understanding of the expected behaviours of their Muslim employees. Muslim employees regardless for who they work are expected to be honest, trustworthy, and determined to continuously strive for the best.

Originality/value

This study is unique from other previous studies. Instead of discussing Islamic management in general, this study explores in‐depth every function of HRM based on authentic Islamic sources, as well as providing empirical evidence.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Junaidah Hashim

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Malaysian managers acquire job competencies through self‐directed learning activities at their workplace. Specifically it aims…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Malaysian managers acquire job competencies through self‐directed learning activities at their workplace. Specifically it aims to investigate what types of job competencies are required for the managers, how they learn to acquire those competencies, and whether the managers have the self‐directed learning attributes and capability to acquire job competencies by self‐directed learning activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through survey. The survey adapted the Self‐Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) developed by Guglielmino. In total 238 respondents participated in this study.

Findings

The findings show that the respondents have identified communication, managerial, and job knowledge as the main competencies required for their jobs. Most of these competencies are acquired through on‐the‐job training, working as part of a team and self‐education. The findings also reveal that the respondents do possess the attributes of self‐directed learners.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support previous research. Given the different cultural background of the Malaysian managers, their ways of learning are similar to those of Western managers. Future research can investigate how employees in other professions learn on their jobs and what other factors may influence self‐directed learning.

Practical implications

Given the emphasis being placed on the importance of work place learning, it is timely to advance a workplace curriculum by integrating the everyday learning experiences and guided learning strategy in the organisation, so that the employees' learning can be facilitated more effectively.

Originality/value

The paper includes the different cultural context of how Malaysian managers learn.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Junaidah Hashim, Saodah Wok and Ruziah Ghazali

This paper aims to examine organisational behaviour as a result of emotional contagion experienced by selected members in direct selling companies. Specifically, it seeks…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine organisational behaviour as a result of emotional contagion experienced by selected members in direct selling companies. Specifically, it seeks to investigate how members in a group are affected by the happiness of their high achievers, what factors influence the emotional contagion to occur, and what are the effects of emotional contagion on individual, group and organisation work outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The variables studied were emotional contagion, personal characteristics, group outcomes and organisational outcomes. Emotional contagion was measured by self‐report of impulsive acts; while personal characteristics were measured in terms of social desirability, extraversion, locus of control, live accomplishment, materialistic world, susceptibility to interpersonal influence, and self‐esteem. Organisational outcome variables were measured in terms of organisational commitment and organisational culture. Other variables studied were group behaviour, team player, demographic characteristics, and business organisational characteristics. A total of 276 respondents participated in this study.

Findings

It is found that emotional contagion is positively related with personal outcomes. Further findings reveal that emotional contagion has an impact on both the group and the team. The team, as a whole, is influenced not only by the emotional contagion but also by the personal characteristics of the respondents. Emotional contagion is also related to organisational outcomes. Both the group characteristics are positively related with organisational commitment. Emotional contagion is also positively related to organisational culture. Group characteristics are also positively related with organisational culture. It can be postulated that the following relationships exist between emotional contagion, personal outcomes, group outcomes, and organisational outcomes. It is also found that emotional contagion is a very important variable in the light of personal characteristics, group characteristics and organisational characteristics.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on a specific industry in Malaysia – direct selling – where no such study has been conducted in the past.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Junaidah Hashim

Training evaluation is an elusive concept, especially when it comes to practice. The practice of evaluation in training has received a lot of criticism. This criticism is…

Abstract

Training evaluation is an elusive concept, especially when it comes to practice. The practice of evaluation in training has received a lot of criticism. This criticism is largely explained by the unsystematic, informal, and ad hoc evaluation that has been conducted by training institutions. In Malaysia, training activities are monitored by the government. Organisations are required to obtain training services from approved training providers registered with the government. Examines the clients’ demand toward evaluation, the commitment given by training providers, and the overall practice of evaluation by the training providers in Malaysia. Finds that the government, client and economic situations have influenced the evaluation practice in a positive direction.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Arif Hassan, Junaidah Hashim and Ahmad Zaki Hj Ismail

The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in HRD system, and to examine the role of HRD practices on employees' development climate and quality orientation in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 239 employees belonging to eight organizations (four of them ISO certified) responded to a questionnaire which measured the following variables: career system, work planning system, development system, self renewal system, and HRD system.

Findings

Results indicated large inter‐organizational differences in HRD practices. In general, however, employees' ratings were moderate. ISO certified companies, compared to others, obtained higher means on some HRD variables. Organizations with better learning, training and development systems, reward and recognition, and information systems promoted human resource development climate. Quality orientation was predicted by career planning, performance guidance and development, role efficacy, and reward and recognition systems.

Research limitations/implications

Comparison between ISO and non‐ISO certified companies did yield some significant differences, yet it was difficult to conclude that the differences were due to ISO certification alone as organizations in the sample were not matched.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by HR practitioners and scholars in building management concerns and advocacy for better HRD systems and practices.

Originality/value

Very little empirical knowledge is available on this subject from transitional economies like Malaysia. The study makes a modest attempt in that direction.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Junaidah Hashim

In an era where religion predominantly presents an integral influence on the way most people live and work, an Islamic approach in managing human resources in Malaysia is…

Abstract

Purpose

In an era where religion predominantly presents an integral influence on the way most people live and work, an Islamic approach in managing human resources in Malaysia is apt. This is due to the fact that Muslim employees represent the largest percentage of the workforce in Malaysia and the Malaysian government is implementing an Islamization process in the country. The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which Muslim employees are aware of Islamic human resource management (HRM) practices and the extent to which Islamic organisations in Malaysia practice HRM based upon the Islamic approaches as outlined by the sacred Islamic texts.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a survey‐based research. It uses a self‐developed questionnaire for data collection. A total of 121 Muslim employees who work in Islamic organisations participate as respondents in this paper. Factor analysis is used for data analysis.

Findings

The results show that the selected Muslim employees in Islamic organisations in Malaysia are aware of the Islamic HRM practices which they practice frequently.

Practical implications

Religious foundations of HRM strategies are important but are rarely highlighted in the literature. This paper would become an important reference for future studies pertaining to HRM practices in the Islamic context. An introduction to Islamic human resource practices is an initial attempt to provide managers with an additional way of managing people. For Muslim human resource managers who work in Islamic organisations, i.e. those Muslim‐owned or dealing with Islamic teachings, it is an obligation for them to not only know but also to apply the Islamic approach in managing employees. Non‐Muslim managers would have a better understanding of the expected and acceptable behaviours of their Muslim employees at the workplace. Among the behaviours expected of true Muslim employees; regardless of whom they work for, are honesty, trustworthiness, and continuous determination to work for the best.

Originality/value

This paper is unique from other previous studies for instead of discussing Islamic management in general, this paper explores in depth every function of HRM based on authentic Islamic sources, as well as providing empirical evidence.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Junaidah Hashim and Saodah Wok

The purpose of this paper is to examine the work challenges of employees with disabilities and predict the organisational behaviours of employees and their involvement in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the work challenges of employees with disabilities and predict the organisational behaviours of employees and their involvement in employment.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-developed questionnaire was used to gather relevant information from employers, employees with disabilities and their co-workers. The questionnaires were distributed and administered by a number of trained enumerators.

Findings

Both employers and co-workers perceived that their organisations have provided conducive organisation climate, comfortable work environment and reasonable adjustment for their employees with disabilities. Employees with disabilities are found loyal and committed. They are satisfied with the job. Organisational loyalty and commitment are predicted by the organisations’ ability to restructure their job design to suit to the needs of employees with disabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Initially, this study planned to use purposive sampling; however, due to poor database maintained by the relevant agency of employees with disability employment in the country, the paper was unable to identify which employers employ how many employees with disabilities. The sampling then was based on convenient sampling.

Practical implications

Job design, organisational climate and comfortable work environment have long been recognised for motivating employees’ performance (Hackman et al., 1975; Garg and Rastogi, 2006). The paper's findings show that these factors also motivate employees with disabilities. This is added value to the existing body of knowledge as limited is known about the motivation of employees with disabilities.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it gathers data from several parties: employees with disabilities, the co-workers and the employers.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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