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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to establish if organisational factors are leading to a negative effect on ambulance personnel’s health. In recent years, frontline ambulance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish if organisational factors are leading to a negative effect on ambulance personnel’s health. In recent years, frontline ambulance personnel have displayed a consistent high rate of sickness amongst healthcare workers within the National Health Service in the UK. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has previously been cited, but organisational factors may be stressors to health.

Design/methodology/approach

A search of electronic databases MEDLINE EBSCO, MEDLINE OVID, MEDLINE PUBMED, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, Zetoc within the time period of 2000–2017 resulted in six mixed methods studies. Hand searching elicited one further study. The literature provided data on organisational and occupational stressors (excluding PTSD) relating to the health of 2,840 frontline ambulance workers in the UK, Australia, Norway, the Netherlands and Canada. The robust quantitative data were obtained from validated questionnaires using statistical analysis, whilst the mixed quality qualitative data elicited similar themes. Narrative synthesis was used to draw theories from the data.

Findings

Organisational factors such as low job autonomy, a lack of supervisor support and poor leadership are impacting on the health and well-being of frontline ambulance workers. This is intertwined with the occupational factors of daily operational demands, fatigue and enforced overtime, so organisational changes may have a wider impact on daily occupational issues.

Originality/value

The findings have possible implications for re-structuring organisational policies within the ambulance service to reduce staff sickness.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Juliet Harrison

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with the million‐selling author, Marshall Goldsmith.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with the million‐selling author, Marshall Goldsmith.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an interview with Marshall Goldsmith, who is author and editor of 31 books, including the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, MOJO, and the WSJ number one business book and winner of the Harold Longman Award for Business Book of the Year, What Got You Here Won't Get You There. His books have been translated into 28 languages, and have become bestsellers in eight countries.

Findings

In the interview, Marshall discusses his innovative approach to executive coaching; the impact of social media for leaders and chief executive officers; and his current research on employee engagement.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that the key figure in executive coaching, upon whom the success of the coaching hinges, is the client themselves.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

John Purcell, Lee Dalgleish, Juliet Harrison, Ian Lonsdale, Ian McConaghy and Alan Robertson

The significance of computer technology in terms of industrial relations is an area which has been neglected in the proliferation of literature accompanying the computer…

Abstract

The significance of computer technology in terms of industrial relations is an area which has been neglected in the proliferation of literature accompanying the computer boom. This omission is becoming increasingly serious. By April 1976, the National Computer Index recorded a total of 9,245 computers in operation within the UK, in industry, the commercial and service sectors, public administration and defence. During the decade 1965–74 the population of computer installations grew by more than five and a half thousand and because this figure includes bureau facilities, it certainly understates the growth in the number of end‐users who have come to rely on computer technology. More importantly, the degree of this reliance has increased as the technology has been applied to a wider range of organisational functions. The growing dependence of organisations on the computer has enhanced its strategic position in the work process. Control over the functioning of the computer thus constitutes a source of increasing power which may well be used by employees as a powerful tool in negotiation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The aim is to provide an interview with Pat Wellington, an internationally recognized management consultant who specializes in leadership, team building, business

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to provide an interview with Pat Wellington, an internationally recognized management consultant who specializes in leadership, team building, business development, change management and customer care.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Effective People Management gives readers a robust understanding of all the essential activities involved in managing staff and maintaining high performance – from selection and interviewing to staff motivation, and from team building to delegating.

Practical implications

The article offers practical insight into the nature of leadership and provides valuable information on relationship management techniques essential for staff retention.

Originality/value

Having experience of a vast array of industries, both within the public and private sectors, Pat emphasizes the importance of maintaining good relationships with workers in order to increase productivity, staff satisfaction and thus improve staff retention. Pat also highlights how financial remuneration is only one model for motivating staff.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Christian Stadler, author of Enduring Success: What We Can Learn From Outstanding Corporations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Christian Stadler, author of Enduring Success: What We Can Learn From Outstanding Corporations.

Design/methodology/approach

Targets nine of Europe's oldest and most stellar companies that have survived for over 100 years and assesses what it is that sets them apart from other businesses.

Findings

The basic framework for enduring success is for corporations to make sure that their organizational structures and strategies are in line with the environment in which they operate.

Practical implications

Addresses a key question in business today: how can companies succeed over time?

Social implications

Discusses how companies can address more recent management concerns, such as corporate social responsibility and sustainability, and incorporate them into their long‐term strategy.

Originality/value

For the past decade, Christian Stadler has investigated long‐lived corporations. His research incorporates fresh insights from management science and provides the first non‐US perspective on long‐range success.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Julian Duxfield, Regional Human Resources Director for G4S, the world's leading international security solutions

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Julian Duxfield, Regional Human Resources Director for G4S, the world's leading international security solutions group, which specializes in outsourced business processes in sectors where security and safety risks are considered a strategic threat.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

The paper reveals that Julian brings with him an extensive knowledge of G4S, having previously worked for G4S Cash Solutions as its HR Director for the past three years. Julian has had a wide ranging career in human resources (HR) spanning both the public and private sectors having been the HR Director for the Department of Transport and Carlsberg UK, as well as carrying out a number of HR management roles at Unilever plc.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

Having worked within both the public and private sector, Julian is able to offer valuable insight into the role of HR within different types of organizations and highlights how a strong brand can influence employee engagement. He also discusses some of the key challenges facing HR professionals today, and offers advice on measuring the well being of your staff.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Chris Ernst and Donna Chrobot‐Mason, authors of Boundary Spanning Leadership, and experts in the field of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with Chris Ernst and Donna Chrobot‐Mason, authors of Boundary Spanning Leadership, and experts in the field of leadership development and psychology.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer

Findings

The advances in internet and collaboration technologies have dismantled many of the boundaries that once prevented people from working together. Yet, as physical boundaries were removed, the boundaries that still exist in human relationships remain, in sharp and jagged relief. In a flat world, bridging boundaries between groups is the new and critical work of leadership.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that can have a broader social impact.

Originality/value

Boundary Spanning Leadership outlines six different types of leadership practices: buffering, reflecting, connecting, mobilizing, weaving and transforming. If implemented, these practices can enable leaders to manage boundaries, forge common ground and discover new frontiers.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Paul Nunes and Tim Breene, authors of Jumping the S‐Curve

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Paul Nunes and Tim Breene, authors of Jumping the S‐Curve

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

Every successful business eventually peaks. Greatness does not last. It falls prey to competition and commoditization, as well as obsolescence from the introduction of new technologies and innovations. And when a business's revenue growth stalls, only 7 percent ever go on to reclaim growth that is better than the growth of the market overall. The only solution is to jump to another growth curve, again and again.

Practical implications

Paul Nunes and Tim Breene take a look at the nature of the business “S‐curve”. Shaped like the first half of the bell curve, this curve is the characteristic depiction of how a new line of business ramps up, grows aggressively, and then ultimately flattens out. Through their interview, Paul and Tim give practical advice on what businesses should be doing in order to prepare for their next “S‐curve”.

Originality/value

The accelerating pace of business is forcing more top management teams to manage both their current successful business and their future business simultaneously. In the past, managers could often wait until the current business was firmly established, or even beginning to show signs of decline, before starting on the next. No longer. In this interview, Nunes and Breene highlight some of the most important disruptors emerging today, including cloud computing and sustainability, which are affecting companies in all industries, offering advice to companies wanting to take the lead in their own reinvention.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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