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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Ubaldino Sequeira Couto and Julie Whitfield

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Julie Whitfield and Leonardo A.N. Dioko

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual comparative framework measuring the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within the UK conference sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual comparative framework measuring the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within the UK conference sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered internet‐based survey was conducted to examine the implementation of ten environmental policy initiatives, expressed by the acronym “GREENER”, using a CSR response scale, expressed by the acronym “VENUE”.

Findings

The greatest proportion of UK venues can be classified as “Eager”, with a quarter of respondents being deemed as “Unmotivated” or in “Eternal denial” regarding their implementation of CSR. It was also found that both size of venue space and venue type have significant effects on the level of CSR implementation.

Research limitations/implications

Environmental performance indicators are not the only components of CSR, there are others, including social, economic and ethical. Further research may expand the framework from a uni‐dimensional environmental framework to a multi‐dimensional framework, through the inclusion of some or all of these CSR components.

Originality/value

The GREENER VENUE framework contributes to two important areas hitherto overlooked in the CSR literature: first, it develops a framework with emphasis toward discretionary practices and illustrates the strength of this method through application to the sizeable and rapidly growing UK conference industry. Second, the framework exhibits conceptual and psychometric properties that enable its application to broad and diverse contexts. It is theoretically grounded but at the same time practical, easy to implement, easily understandable and highly relatable to organisational managers, frontline employees and many other key stakeholders of any industry.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Leonardo (Don) A.N. Dioko and Julie Whitfield

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which price competitiveness accounts for the observed precipitated decline in the number of meetings taking place in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which price competitiveness accounts for the observed precipitated decline in the number of meetings taking place in Macau from 2009 to 2012, in spite of the rapid growth in overall tourism, diversification in its tourism offering, and the sizable expansion of its capacity and facilities for hosting business tourism over the same period.

Design/methodology/approach

Analyzing historical as well as comparative data in a cross-section analytic design, the study suggests an implied competitive price range (using comparative accommodation prices as a proxy) beyond which financial incentives may be ineffectual in attracting meetings

Findings

Examination of price levels as a proxy of competitiveness in attracting meeting events in the single case of Macau proved inconclusive. Other factors beyond mere price competitiveness likely account for the declining number of meetings in Macau from 2009 to the end of 2012.

Originality/value

Overall, the above findings pose a challenge for the continued general development of MICE industry in Macau and its meetings industry in particular. Despite the noble and generous efforts of its government agencies to arrest the decline in the number of meetings and maintain Macau’s position as a meetings industry hub through monetary incentives and subvention packages for organizers, it would benefit them and the private sector to explore channeling more resources toward addressing the fundamental and structural factors that can improve long-term competitiveness in attracting more meeting events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Miguel Moital, Julie Whitfield, Caroline Jackson and Arjun Bahl

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding event sponsorship activity, perceptions of event sponsorship, motives to sponsor, form of investment and structure of sponsorship was obtained from a sample of 61 drinks producers in India through a questionnaire. Mann‐Whitney and logistic regression were employed to compare the alcoholic and the non‐alcoholic sectors.

Findings

The results suggest that the alcohol and non‐alcohol drinks sectors sponsored a similar level of events, but in investment volume terms, sponsorship from the non‐alcoholic sector is far greater than that of the alcoholic sector. While the two sectors are similar in many ways, the emphasis placed on certain motives for sponsoring events was different, with alcoholic drinks businesses placing greater importance on reaching niche audiences and increasing media coverage than non‐alcoholic ones.

Research limitations/implications

A limited number of areas of the sponsorship decision‐making were covered, yet the study provides insights into the decision making of one of the key sponsoring industries: the drinks industry.

Practical implications

Securing sponsorship is becoming more difficult and complex. By understanding how sponsors make decisions, including potential variations between companies within an industry, event organisers will be in a better position to tailor sponsorship proposals, enhancing the likelihood of obtaining the desired sponsorship contracts.

Originality/value

Most sponsor decision‐making research focuses on how sponsorship decisions can be improved so that they work better for the sponsor. This paper, in contrast, emphasises that by understanding how clients make decisions (i.e. sponsors), sellers (i.e. the sponsored) will be in a better position to win over competition and secure the desired sponsorship deals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Fevzi Okumus

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Anna Leask and Ahmed Hassanien

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Richard Whitfield

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Additions for use in polyurethane coatings. Angus Chemie GmbH has announced the introduction of two new additions to its product line for polyurethane coatings. Zoldine…

Abstract

Additions for use in polyurethane coatings. Angus Chemie GmbH has announced the introduction of two new additions to its product line for polyurethane coatings. Zoldine RD‐20 Reactive Diluent is designed to replace higher viscosity polyols in high solids polyurethane coatings. Zoldine MS‐Plus Moisture Scavenger eliminates bubbles, pinholes, downglossing and hazing in polyurethane coatings to allow for fast cure times in all types of weather.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Julie Cloutier, Denis Morin and Stéphane Renaud

This study aims to determine the effect of individual and group variable pay plans on pay satisfaction among Canadian workers from six occupational groups.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the effect of individual and group variable pay plans on pay satisfaction among Canadian workers from six occupational groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical foundations rest on the discrepancy model of pay satisfaction and equity theory. Canadian national data from the Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that individual and group variable pay plans act differently on workers’ pay satisfaction. For individual pay plans, being eligible for a variable pay plan, and thereby having one's performance rewarded, has no effect on pay satisfaction. Workers on variable pay plans are more satisfied with their pay only when they receive performance‐dependent payouts. In short, they want to be rewarded not only for performance but also for effort. For group pay plans, not receiving payouts has no negative effect on pay satisfaction. In contrast, receiving payouts creates pay dissatisfaction. Individual and group plans have a distinct effect on pay satisfaction by occupational group.

Practical implications

Managers can make informed decisions regarding the adoption of variable pay plans and their implementation.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the link between variable pay and pay satisfaction. It improves our understanding of the mechanism by which variable pay affects pay satisfaction: the effort – performance – pay link (i.e. risk and perceived fairness of the allocation).

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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