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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Julie Tryon

Since the mid‐1960s, people have begun to change their attitudes towards death and the role it plays in our society. Many find problems with the fact that an increasing…

Abstract

Since the mid‐1960s, people have begun to change their attitudes towards death and the role it plays in our society. Many find problems with the fact that an increasing number of people die in old age, afflicted with chronic diseases, and that a majority of people in the United States die in public institutions such as hospitals, extended care facilities, or convalescent homes. Questions have been raised regarding the extent to which technology should be used to keep someone alive, when doing so seems futile or even cruel. We are beginning to realize that our society at present does not deal effectively with this growing populaton of the aged.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Elaine J. Christian, Frances Bradburn, Sandra M. Cooper, Janice L. Daquila, Pamela Doyle, Beverley Gass, Pat Langelier, Lynne Lysiak, Julie Blume Nye, Pat Ryckman and Joel Sigmon

From providing public Internet access in rural communities to pioneering the development of a model automated document delivery system, libraries of every type in the…

Abstract

From providing public Internet access in rural communities to pioneering the development of a model automated document delivery system, libraries of every type in the state are engaged in a variety of multi‐library automation and connectivity efforts. The following descriptions include projects from academic libraries, public libraries, state agencies, and a library school.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Christina Julie Kozar and Andrew Day

Offending behavior change programs play an important role in the prevention of criminal behavior, particularly when offered to violent offenders. There is, however, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Offending behavior change programs play an important role in the prevention of criminal behavior, particularly when offered to violent offenders. There is, however, little consensus about how content should be delivered, despite agreement that the development of a strong therapeutic alliance (TA) is an important determinant of outcome. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the TA is formed within correctional programs.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 27 therapists who delivered correctional group treatment explored issues relating to the role of the alliance in offending behavior programs. A grounded theory methodology was employed to develop a conceptual understanding of therapist perspectives and practises.

Findings

Three different modes of practice were identified: “educative” to enforce boundaries of group behavior; “engagement” to promote a collaborative approach; and “therapeutic” to enhance client insight.

Practical implications

Greater awareness of the skills and supports required to successfully develop strong TAs in correctional populations may assist better retention and treatment outcomes in offending behavior programs. The ability to work flexibly between different modes of practise may prove important to rehabilitation efforts.

Originality/value

A model of the TA based on therapists’ accounts of their practise in correctional programs is presented. It is anticipated that, particularly for novice correctional therapists, exploration of the ways in which the alliance can be established and ruptures responded to will enhance treatment efficacy, particularly in treating violent offenders who can be challenging to engage.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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