Search results

1 – 6 of 6
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Julie Posselt

Rising rates of anxiety and depression and the varied costs of these conditions indicate a clear need to create learning environments in which graduate and professional…

Abstract

Purpose

Rising rates of anxiety and depression and the varied costs of these conditions indicate a clear need to create learning environments in which graduate and professional students can more readily thrive. However, the absence of multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary evidence about mental health in graduate education has obscured a clear picture of which populations, contexts and social dynamics merit focused attention and resources. The purpose of this study is therefore to analyze prevalence and risk factors associated with anxiety and depression among a large sample of graduate students, with special attention to how graduate education environments and interactions may be associated with mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers the first multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary analysis of depression and anxiety among US graduate and professional students. Using a sample of 20,888 students randomly sampled within 69 universities, the author compares depression and anxiety prevalence among fields of study with hierarchical cluster modeling. Then, using a conceptual framework that links social support, role strain and self-determination theories, the author estimates fixed effects multivariate logistic regressions to measure how depression and anxiety are associated with experiencing racial discrimination, support from friends and family, perceived competitiveness in one’s classes, and comfort speaking with one’s professors about mental health.

Findings

Graduate students who endure frequent racial discrimination have odds of screening positive for depression and anxiety that are 2.3 and 3.0 times higher, respectively, than those who never experience discrimination. Support from family and friends moderates these relationships and perceived competitiveness exacerbates them. LGBTQ students and students who self-report that finances are a struggle or tight also have higher odds of depression and anxiety. Students in the humanities, arts and architecture have significantly higher prevalence of depression and anxiety than the sample as a whole.

Originality/value

The paper offers broadest base of evidence to date about patterns that are usually experienced at the individual level or analyzed institution-by-institution and field-by-field. Specifically, the author identified social dynamics, fields of study and populations where attention to wellbeing may be especially warranted. The conceptual framework and multivariate results clarify how organizational and individual factors in graduate students’ mental health may be intertwined through competitive, discriminatory, or supportive interactions with peers, faculty, family and friends. Findings clarify a need for awareness of the contexts and interactions that graduate students experience as well as individual factors that are associated with student wellbeing.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Kamaria B. Porter, Julie R. Posselt, Kimberly Reyes, Kelly E. Slay and Aurora Kamimura

As part of the broader effort to diversify higher education in the USA, many science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) doctoral programs are deeply engaged…

1309

Abstract

Purpose

As part of the broader effort to diversify higher education in the USA, many science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) doctoral programs are deeply engaged in diversity work – an array of formal activities and practices meant to boost the representation of women and students of color. This paper aims to examine how underrepresented doctoral students in high-diversity STEM PhD programs contribute to diversity work in their programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was used to understand the nature of diversity work in four STEM doctoral programs that have enrolled and graduated women and/or underrepresented students of color at rates significantly higher than their disciplines, despite being located in states with affirmative action bans. This study analyzes qualitative data from 24 semi-structured interviews and four focus groups with students from across the four departments.

Findings

Data reveal that underrepresented students are simultaneously positioned as representatives of progress and uncompensated consultants in their departments’ ongoing equity and diversity efforts. As a result, student contributions to diversity work are experienced as an ongoing process of emotional labor in which institutional ethos and/or feeling rules in the department shape how students manage their internal and external emotions.

Originality/value

Although diversity-related work is widespread and growing within colleges and universities, this study shows how student engagement in diversification efforts can lead to significant emotional burdens that go unnoticed and uncompensated. In highlighting the invisibility of emotional labor and the skew of its distribution toward minoritized groups, this research calls attention to how tacit feeling rules can undermine the ultimate goal of diversity initiatives within graduate departments and programs.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Julie Renee Posselt and Kim R. Black

Undergraduate research experiences are associated with higher post‐baccalaureate enrolment rates for first‐generation students, but scholars have yet to develop…

Abstract

Purpose

Undergraduate research experiences are associated with higher post‐baccalaureate enrolment rates for first‐generation students, but scholars have yet to develop explanations for why this is the case. This paper aims to examine the experience of first‐generation undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case study methodology informed by grounded theory analytic methods, the authors qualitatively examine the experience of undergraduate research for ten first‐generation undergraduate students in the Ronald E. McNair Post‐baccalaureate Achievement Program, a faculty diversity programme funded by the US federal government located on almost 200 colleges and universities.

Findings

Students describe a recursive growth process that involved the acquisition of concrete skills, support from a cohort of their peers, mentoring relationships, and positive external recognition. By socialising them to forms of social and cultural capital that are valued in the academy, the programme cultivates the research identities and aspirations of participants. Students themselves develop a secondary habitus as well as a desire to challenge prevailing scholarly norms through their research aims and topics. Findings help refine Bourdieu's theory of reproduction in education and society for the context of American graduate education, for as students come to see themselves differently, they also see their futures differently and enrol in graduate education at higher rates than the national average.

Originality/value

This research is the first to examine how first generation students uniquely benefit from undergraduate research experiences.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Linda Evans

108

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Linda Evans

107

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Jonathan Led Larsen, Katrine Schepelern Johansen, Julie Nordgaard and Mimi Yung Mehlsen

Cannabis use in the context of psychosis has been shown to have a negative impact on prognosis and yet it is difficult to treat. Recent randomized controlled trials all…

Abstract

Purpose

Cannabis use in the context of psychosis has been shown to have a negative impact on prognosis and yet it is difficult to treat. Recent randomized controlled trials all have negative findings and novel approaches is sought after. This paper aims to use an embodied cognition framework to add to the understanding of cannabis use in psychosis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents longitudinal, qualitative data on two individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and using cannabis at least twice weekly prior to inclusion in the study. Factors influencing cannabis use were mapped in dialogue with the participants. Each participant was interviewed six times over the course of a year. The analysis was informed theoretically to describe processes maintaining or ameliorating cannabis use over time.

Findings

This study shows that a systems approach for understanding changes in cannabis use is meaningful; the richness of observations add to the understanding of differences in outcomes. Findings suggest that reductions in cannabis use in psychosis could be dependent on synergistic effects between contextual conditions. Attending closer to the experience of patients may help inform future interventions. However, interventions focusing on single mechanisms may be futile, if an array of individual, formative experiences are a prerequisite for change. A systemic understanding of dual diagnosis calls for tailored, individualized interventions.

Originality/value

The research tests a novel systemic perspective on cannabis use in psychosis by applying it to qualitative longitudinal data. Adding a systemic perspective may help develop future interventions addressing cannabis use in psychosis, which has long been considered a “hard problem” in dual diagnosis treatment.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6