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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Julie McLeod and Richard Marciano

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Biddy Casselden, Geoff Walton, Alison Pickard and Julie Mcleod

The purpose of this paper is to consider the preliminary findings arising from two case study library authorities in the North East of England, examining current volunteer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the preliminary findings arising from two case study library authorities in the North East of England, examining current volunteer use in Public Libraries. Specific reference to quality and professionalism will be discussed, to identify key trends and ways forward.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved a series of interviews with key staff, a staff survey, user survey and volunteer focus groups.

Findings

The early-stage results of the qualitative analysis are reported, including key emergent themes relating to quality and professionalism. Triangulation of the key stakeholder opinions will be carried out.

Research limitations/implications

This research relates to an area that is a key factor of modern public library provision, and helps to illustrate the complex environment that exists.

Practical implications

Volunteer use in public libraries is a feature of the hybrid model of library provision in the twenty-first century, and the need to ensure quality and professionalism to improve service provision is even more critical.

Social implications

This research considers current thinking amongst stakeholders within public libraries and attempts to move the debate about volunteer use in library service provision forward.

Originality/value

It provides initial thoughts on what features are essential for successful volunteer use in public libraries, with regard to quality and professionalism.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Julie McLeod

The purpose of this paper is to canvass debates arising from encounters between architectural and educational history and to introduce a themed section of four papers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to canvass debates arising from encounters between architectural and educational history and to introduce a themed section of four papers exploring aspects of the history of school design and the spatial arrangements of Australian schooling across the twentieth century.

Design/methodology/approach –

This is an interpretive introductory essay that characterizes trends in historical and sociological studies of school space and materialities, and synthesizes the arguments and contributions of the four companion papers.

Findings

A case is made for greater exchange among educational, architectural and social historians and key insights and findings from the four papers concerning school space, design and educational ideas are summarized. Themes of community, citizenship and progressive education are highlighted.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in introducing the context and scholarly debates framing a collection of four papers that seek to open up new avenues for investigating the history of modern schooling through studying intersections between school space and design and educational purposes and aspiration.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Julie McLeod

The purpose of this paper is to explore philosophies of progressive education circulating in Australia in the period immediately following the expansion of secondary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore philosophies of progressive education circulating in Australia in the period immediately following the expansion of secondary schools in the 1960s. It examines the rise of the alternative and community school movement of the 1970s, focusing on initiatives within the Victorian government school sector. It aims to better understand the realisation of progressive education in the design and spatial arrangements of schools, with specific reference to the re-making of school and community relations and new norms of the student-subject of alternative schooling.

Design/methodology/approach

It combines historical analysis of educational ideas and reforms, focusing largely on the ideas of practitioners and networks of educators, and is guided by an interest in the importance of school space and place in mediating educational change and aspirations. It draws on published writings and reports from teachers and commentators in the 1970s, publications from the Victorian Department of Education, media discussions, internal and published documentation on specific schools and oral history interviews with former teachers and principals who worked at alternative schools.

Findings

It shows the different realisation of radical aims in the set up of two schools, against a backdrop of wider innovations in state education, looking specifically at the imagined effects of re-arranging the physical and symbolic space of schooling.

Originality/value

Its value lies in offering the beginnings of a history of 1970s educational progressivism. It brings forward a focus on the spatial dimensions of radical schooling, and moves from characterisation of a mood of change to illuminate the complexities of these ideas in the contrasting ambitions and design of two signature community schools.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Catherine Hare and Julie McLeod

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Julie McLeod

This article seeks to provide a perspective on a future pathway for records management that is based on taking a proportionate approach rather than striving for

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to provide a perspective on a future pathway for records management that is based on taking a proportionate approach rather than striving for perfection. This approach requires a re‐interpretation of traditional principles and their application in practice and recognition of the predominance of people in successful information and records management in the digital domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The views are the author's based on the headline findings of a major research project (AC+erm) which investigated issues and practical strategies for accelerating positive change in electronic records management. They incorporate views on contextual developments since the project, in particular the characteristics of today's hybrid and increasingly mobile office environment such as the use of recognition technologies.

Findings

The ten headline findings of the AC+erm project are shared. Two strategic findings are highlighted, namely, articulating a vision of successful electronic records management and the approach to applying records management principles in order to realise that vision of success. The article then focuses on two of the other findings, about the need for information and records professionals to adopt proportionate and risk based approaches and to ensure they (the records professionals) are an essential part of the solution not the problem. Post the project, views on these and tactics for addressing them are discussed with reference to real examples and potential future research and development.

Research limitations/implications

The research that provides the context for the article was qualitative and therefore its findings transferrable rather than generalisable. The views expressed about tactics for moving forward are intended to contribute to the debate about approaches to managing records in the democratic, digital domain.

Practical implications

A proportionate approach to managing records by definition implies a risk‐based approach. This may prove challenging in organizational, societal and cultural contexts that are risk averse.

Originality/value

The research which underpins this article was the first on the subject to be conducted in the UK and adopted a unique evidence‐based approach. Undertaken in the context of the “promise” of electronic document and records management systems, its findings are relevant in the broader systems solutions. They provide a context for this perspective on current and potential tactics for addressing strategic issues for managing records in the digital domain. This provides a significant contribution to knowledge and debate in this field.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Julie McLeod

This article shares the results of a preliminary investigation into the impact of ISO 15489, the international records management standard, conducted between January 2002…

Abstract

This article shares the results of a preliminary investigation into the impact of ISO 15489, the international records management standard, conducted between January 2002 and March 2003. Attendees at a series of records management and information management events were asked about their awareness of, initial reactions to and plans for using the standard. The results show a relatively high level of awareness of the standard within and beyond the records management profession and very positive reactions to its publication, despite any imperfections. Most encouraging of all was the range of plans for using the standard. As well as using it for policy/strategy development, to underpin records management procedures and to benchmark current practice, many records professionals plan to use the standard to raise the profile of records management within their organisations.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Julie McLeod

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Julie McLeod

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Ligia (Licho) López López, Christopher T. McCaw, Rhonda Di Biase, Amy McKernan, Sophie Rudolph, Aristidis Galatis, Nicky Dulfer, Jessica Gerrard, Elizabeth McKinley, Julie McLeod and Fazal Rizvi

The archives gathered in this collection engage in the current COVID-19 moment. They do so in order to attempt to understand it, to think and feel with others and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The archives gathered in this collection engage in the current COVID-19 moment. They do so in order to attempt to understand it, to think and feel with others and to create a collectivity that, beyond the slogan “we are in this together”, seriously contemplates the implications of what it means to be given an opportunity to alter the course of history, to begin to learn to live and educate otherwise.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is collectively written by twelve academics in March 2020, a few weeks into the first closing down of common spaces in 2020, Victoria, Australia. Writing through and against “social isolation”, the twelve quarantine archives in this paper are all at once questions, methods, data, analysis, implications and limitations of these pandemic times and their afterlives.

Findings

These quarantine archives reveal a profound sense of dislocation, relatability and concern. Several of the findings in this piece succeed at failing to explain in generalising terms these un-new upending times and, in the process, raise more questions and propose un-named methodologies.

Originality/value

If there is anything this paper could claim as original, it would be its present ability to respond to the current times as a historical moment of intensity. At times when “isolation”, “self” and “contained” are the common terms of reference, the “collective”, “connected” and “socially engaged” nature of this paper defies those very terms. Finally, the socially transformative desire archived in each of the pieces is a form of future history-making that resists the straight order with which history is often written and made.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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