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1 – 10 of 23
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

J.P. Shim, Kyungmo Ahn and Julie M. Shim

The purpose of this study is to present an overview of digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB) and to explore the users' perception on DMB cellular phone or “cellevision”…

3584

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present an overview of digital multimedia broadcasting (DMB) and to explore the users' perception on DMB cellular phone or “cellevision”, video‐on‐the‐go services that deliver television to cell phones.

Design/methodology/approach

This two‐phase study explores users' reactions to DMB contents and services, users' perceptions on the pricing of DMB phone handsets, phone usage time, program contents, and DMB carrier services. Findings from the use of qualitative method of existential phenomenology were explored further with quantitative analyses including T‐test, ANOVA, and Duncan test.

Findings

The young generation will be a major impact on the DMB market due to their mindset and lifestyle. Thus, the DMB market strategy should be to base decisions on reaching out and focusing on the younger generation (especially, the teens) as the latest trendsetters.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was collected during the experimental/trial stages of satellite DMB services. This research should be continued to solidify findings with an increased sample size of respondents collected during the actual stage of satellite‐DMB and terrestrial‐DMB services.

Practical implications

The findings from this exploratory research will be valuable for the DMB service and content providers to gain insight into various age groups and their perceptions.

Originality/value

This study is the first kind of research in this area. With the study as a forerunner, the authors examined the effect of DMB mobile phone program contents and services on users.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 106 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

J.P. Shim, Sungmin Park and Julie M. Shim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of current mobile TV phone usage and discuss the issues for strategic implications for the communications and mobile TV industry.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of current mobile TV phone usage and discuss the issues for strategic implications for the communications and mobile TV industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Real tracking data, collected from server's logs during 2006 and 2007 from South Korean satellite DMB providers, were analyzed according to users' age group, peak viewing time of programs, location usage and program duration. Further analysis with the previous literature led to inferences about strategic implications.

Findings

The analysis revealed the current mobile TV usage patterns: widespread user age group, peak viewing time, high indoor usage and longer viewing time. These results shaped strategic implications, furthering and enhancing a personalized media experience.

Research limitations/implications

The data set, collected from the subscription‐based satellite DMB usage in South Korea, is well recognized as being a technological frontier. Further cultural comparison research work on mobile TV usage is required to validate the strategic implications for a wider cross cultural adoption.

Practical implications

This research benefits the strategic planning of the mobile communications and entertainment content industries in decision‐making regarding the improvement of hands‐on experience for mobile TV users.

Originality/value

The findings, based on the mobile TV real tracking data, collected in South Korea for over two years contrast to that of other countries, which only begin to experience the roll‐out of a full commercial service. Consequently, the data presented here highlights an important role in understanding and shaping of the mobile TV phone market for other parts of the world.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 108 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2023

Kathryn Burrows

To understand how parents make the decision to implant their deaf young children with cochlear implants, focusing specifically on the concepts of normality, medicalization, and…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how parents make the decision to implant their deaf young children with cochlear implants, focusing specifically on the concepts of normality, medicalization, and stigma.

Methodology/Approach

I conducted 33 semi-structured interviews with the hearing parents or parent of children with cochlear implants. In all but two families I interviewed the primary caretaker which in all cases was a mother. In the remaining two interviews, I interviewed both parents together. Because of the relative scarcity of families with children with cochlear implants, and the difficulty in connecting with these families, I used a convenience sample, and I did not stratify it in any way. The only requirement for parents to be interviewed is that they had at least one deaf child who had been implanted with at least one cochlear implant. Although this is a small sample, the findings are transferable to other families with the same sociodemographic characteristics as those in my study.

Findings

Parents in the study focused on three key concepts: normality, risk analysis, and being a good parent. Dispositional factors such as the need to be “normal” and the desire for material success for one's children appeared to moderate the cost-benefit calculus.

Research Limitations/Implications

Limitations

This interview project concentrated on hearing families who had implanted their deaf children with cochlear implants; it does not include culturally Deaf parents who choose to use American Sign Language (ASL) with their Deaf children. Understanding how Deaf families understand the concepts of normality, medicalization, and stigma would shed light on how a distinctly “abnormal” group (by a statistical conception of normal) – ASL-using Deaf people-explain normality in the face of using a non-typical communication method. One can learn a lot by studying the absence of a phenomena, in this case, not implanting children with cochlear implants. It is possible that the existential threat felt by some Deaf people, specifically the demographic problem presented by cochlear implants, led Deaf educators or parents to resist being the subject of research.

Overwhelmingly the sample was female, and white. Only two participants were male, and none of the participants were non-white. The lack of diversity in the sample does not necessarily reflect a lack of diversity of children receiving cochlear implants. Medicaid, which disproportionately covers families of color, covers cochlear implants in most cases, so low SES/racial intersectionality should not have affected the lack of diversity in the sample. However, the oral schools are all private pay, with few scholarships available, so low SES/racial intersectionality in the sampling universe (all children who attend oral schools), may have played a part in the lack of racial diversity within the sample.

Implications

Parents in this study were very specific about the fact that they believed cochlear implants would lead to academic, professional, and personal success. They weaved narratives of normality, medicalization, and stigma through their stories. Normality is an important lens from which to see stories about disability and ability, as well as medical correction. As medical science continues to advance, more and more conditions will become medicalized, leading to more and more people taking advanced medical treatments to address problems that were previously considered “problems with living” that are now considered “medical problems” that can be treated with advanced science.

Originality/Value of Paper

This chapter's contribution to the sociological cochlear implant literature is it's weaving of narratives about normality, stigma, and medicalization into parental stories about the cochlear implant decision-making process. Most literature about the cochlear implant decision-making process focus on cost-benefit analysis, and logical decision-making processes, whereas this paper focuses on decision-making factors stemming from bias, emotions, and values.

Details

Social Factors, Health Care Inequities and Vaccination
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-795-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Julie V. Stanton and Diane M. Paolo

This study aims to examine the nature and impact of information overload and related coping strategies in the context of apparel shopping. It also examines perceptions of overload…

2963

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the nature and impact of information overload and related coping strategies in the context of apparel shopping. It also examines perceptions of overload and coping strategies as antecedents to consumer confidence, shopping orientation and leader/follower status.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups and previous literature are used to develop components for a survey of US consumer perceptions. The 205 valid responses were factor analyzed to identify components of information overload and coping strategies, and cluster analysis was used to identify groupings of consumers around those constructs.

Findings

Consumer segments that result from cluster analysis show meaningful descriptions regarding information flow, over‐choice and coping strategies. Segments also differ on confidence level, shopping orientation and fashion leadership in ways that appear logically related to their information and coping strategy perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not explore the underlying psychological and intellectual processes that influence attitude toward information flow and coping strategies.

Practical implications

By categorizing consumer attitudes toward and strategies for coping with too much information, the study offers the industry insight into how modern marketing strategies may backfire rather than create knowledgeable consumers ready to adopt the latest products made available to them.

Originality/value

This study is the first to view information overload and coping strategies as antecedents to confidence, shopper orientation and fashion leadership.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Fatima Regany and Julie Emontspool

This paper investigates how members of ethnic minorities perceive ethnic-themed retail spectacles staged by mainstream marketers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates how members of ethnic minorities perceive ethnic-themed retail spectacles staged by mainstream marketers.

Methodology/approach

The data was collected in the North of France, through ethnographic methods combining in-depth interviews with French-Moroccan consumers, field observation of their shopping behavior in supermarkets, and online discussions on the subject.

Findings

The consumers’ responses reflect perceptions of dystopia, articulated in two interrelated types of discourses: inclusion versus exclusion on the one hand, and consumerism and the commodification of religion on the other. Spectacles aimed at being a cosmopolitan utopia into a spectacle become thus perceived as dystopic, alienating consumers who belong to ethnic minorities, some of whom will as a result oppose or boycott the supermarkets.

Research limitations/implications

Given its phenomenological focus on consumers’ perception, this study provides an emic perspective on the phenomenon of ethnic retail spectacles. Further research should therefore study these contexts from multiple angles, in order to consider the role of other market actors such as retailers or the larger socio-political context.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing research by providing an understanding of ethnic minorities’ perceptions of product cross-over, understudied until now when it comes to mainstream marketplaces. Moreover, it highlights the importance of studying retail environments such as supermarkets, where ethnic spectacles enter consumers’ everyday life.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Jing Jian Xiao, Jin Huang, Kirti Goyal and Satish Kumar

This study aims to examine the literature on consumer financial capability. By analyzing the research trends, theories, definitions and themes, the literature on financial…

1990

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the literature on consumer financial capability. By analyzing the research trends, theories, definitions and themes, the literature on financial capability is synthesized, and agenda for future research is suggested. A framework is presented that portrays the antecedents as well as the outcomes of financial capability and their interlinkages.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a systematic approach, the review is based on 215 articles published during January 2007 and–March 2022, retrieved from Scopus. It presents the definitions and theories of financial capability, publication trends, influential articles, prominent authors, prolific journals and countries publishing on financial capability. Using bibliographic coupling, the intellectual structure of the topic is explored, along with offering a framework through content analysis.

Findings

The bibliographic coupling analysis identifies four major clusters of research themes and capability theory appeared to be the most prominent theory. The synthesis draws upon five conceptual definitions of financial capability. Based on the discussion, in this review, financial capability is defined as an individual ability to apply appropriate financial knowledge, perform desirable financial behaviors and take available financial opportunities for achieving financial well-being. A conceptual framework delineates the synthesized literature and propositions based on this framework and relevant research are proposed. Finally, directions for future research are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper is an attempt to offer a comprehensive synthesis of the scholarship on financial capability and its conceptualization. It further proposes an extensive future research agenda. The study has implications for financial services providers relating to retail bank marketing.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Paige Haber-Curran and Nicholas Tapia-Fuselier

There is a recent call for and emergence of leadership research that purposefully centers students’ social identities and lived experiences in order to gain more nuanced…

Abstract

There is a recent call for and emergence of leadership research that purposefully centers students’ social identities and lived experiences in order to gain more nuanced understandings of college student leadership development and elevate marginalized voices in the leadership narrative. In this qualitative study, the researchers focused on the leadership approaches of Latina college student leaders at Hispanic Serving Institutions and the influences that shape their approaches to leadership. The findings reveal participants’ unique forms of capital as well as sources of on-campus support that shape and influence their leadership beliefs and styles, including a focus on community, a commitment to making a positive impact, and non-hierarchical approaches to leadership.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Ashlyn M. Jaeger

Purpose – Using elective egg and sperm freezing as a case to compare representations of men and women as agents of biological reproduction, this chapter aims to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose – Using elective egg and sperm freezing as a case to compare representations of men and women as agents of biological reproduction, this chapter aims to understand how gender and risk are co-produced in the context of new reproductive technologies (NRTs).

Methodology – Through a content analysis of newspaper articles published between 1980 and 2016 about egg and sperm freezing, the author traces how fertility risks facing men and women are portrayed in the media.

Findings – Candidates for egg freezing were portrayed in one of the three ways: as cancer patients, career women, or single and waiting for a partner. The ideal users of sperm freezing are depicted in primarily two ways: as cancer patients and as employees in professions with hazardous working conditions. Threats to future fertility for women pursuing careers uninterrupted by pregnancy and child-rearing and women seeking romantic partners are largely portrayed as the result of internal risks. However, threats to future fertility for men working in dangerous professions are largely portrayed as external to them.

Research Limitations – Race and class did not emerge as dominant themes in these data; given the lack of accessibility to NRTs by class and race, this silence must be interrogated by further research.

Value – By comparing the constructions of at-risk groups, the author argues the medicalization of reproduction is gendered as fertility risks portrayed in the media take on a different character between men and women. This research shows how the gendered construction of infertility risk reinforces normative expectations around child-rearing and perpetuates gender inequity in parenting norms.

Details

Childbearing and the Changing Nature of Parenthood: The Contexts, Actors, and Experiences of Having Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-067-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of 23