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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Jaspreet Phull and Julie Hall

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences and opinions of mental health professionals working in two rehabilitation wards to a clinical dashboard system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences and opinions of mental health professionals working in two rehabilitation wards to a clinical dashboard system.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the creation of the clinical dashboards, a questionnaire was developed and sent to staff and patients across two clinical wards involved in the clinical dashboard mental health pilot.

Findings

The clinical dashboards were viewed as being useful tools for clinicians, supporting engagement. They can offer rapid access to large volumes of clinically useful information, in a palatable format. The pilot suggested that they could be presented in different ways to make them easier to engage with however they could also result in more paperwork for clinicians.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations included the sample size, responder bias and the limited sampling period. It would have been helpful to have obtained further responses to understand why individuals came to their conclusions.

Practical implications

The development and use of clinical dashboards in a psychiatric rehabilitation setting offered the opportunity to improve quality, collect and respond to relevant clinical data trends: which is regarded positively by staff and patients.

Originality/value

This study represents the first study to examine the use of clinical dashboards within a UK long stay adult mental health ward setting. The results suggest a positive response from both staff and patients and illustrates the potential benefits relating to clinical quality.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Chris Walsh and Claire Campbell

This chapter explores how to introduce young children to coding as a literacy using mobile devices. Learning how to code is changing what it means to be literate in the…

Abstract

This chapter explores how to introduce young children to coding as a literacy using mobile devices. Learning how to code is changing what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century and, increasingly, early years educators are expected to teach young children how to code. The idea that coding is a literacy practice is relatively new, and this chapter first presents strategies for introducing coding without technology. It then explores how to scaffold young children’s coding literacy proficiencies through programming and coding robotic toys. When young children have become familiar with coding and solving challenges using concrete materials and robotic toys, it is possible to introduce mobile devices, apps and humanoid robots in playful ways. This chapter explores how this can be done.

Details

Mobile Technologies in Children’s Language and Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-879-6

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Bernard J. Jaworski and Robert S. Lurie

Abstract

Details

The Organic Growth Playbook: Activate High-Yield Behaviors to Achieve Extraordinary Results – Every Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-687-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Ray Denenberg, Bob Rader, Thomas P. Brown, Wayne Davison and Fred Lauber

The Linked Systems project (LSP) is directed towards implementing computer‐to‐computer communications among its participants. The original three participants are the…

Abstract

The Linked Systems project (LSP) is directed towards implementing computer‐to‐computer communications among its participants. The original three participants are the Library of Congress (LC), the Research Libraries Group (RLG), and the Western Library Network (WLN, formerly the Washington Library Network). The project now has a fourth participant, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC). LSP consists of two major components. The first component, Authorities Implementation, is described in Library Hi Tech issue 10 (page 61). The second component, the Standard Network Interconnection (SNI), is the specification of the LSP protocols, and the implementation of these protocols on the participant systems. Protocol specification was a joint effort of the original three participants (LC, RLG, and WLN) and was described in Library Hi Tech issue 10 (page 71). Implementation, however, has consisted of individual efforts of the (now) four participants. This four‐part report focuses on these individual implementation efforts.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Catherine Hare and Julie McLeod

Records management was identified as an emerging research theme in the last Research Assessment Exercise return from the School of Information Studies, University of…

Abstract

Records management was identified as an emerging research theme in the last Research Assessment Exercise return from the School of Information Studies, University of Northumbria at Newcastle. This article examines how, since then, the School has approached developing its research profile in records management and highlights issues applicable to other researchers in the subject area within the UK. The School’s medium to long term strategy for records management research is presented

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Julie Starr

Traditional approaches to managing people simply do not work. Being directive, i.e. “I tell you what to do and when to do it” inhibits development of the individual over…

Abstract

Traditional approaches to managing people simply do not work. Being directive, i.e. “I tell you what to do and when to do it” inhibits development of the individual over time. Staff continually instructed by overly directive managers do not blossom, they wither. When we tell staff how to do everything, we are actually teaching them to do less for themselves.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Julie Walker

This paper aims to give insight into the role of a liaison worker.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give insight into the role of a liaison worker.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a first person account of someone in the role of Mental Health and Housing Liaison Officer.

Findings

The paper offers insight into a day in the life of a liaison worker, including information about how they work and communicate with clients and their various different situations.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that communication is central to delivering good and appropriate services for clients. Joint working between housing and mental health needs to become the norm, and a role such as this is the fore‐runner to what the author hopes will become part of every mental health service in the country.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Abstract

Details

Geographies of Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-212-7

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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Julie A. Lockhart and M. R. Mathews

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-758-6

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Julie Willis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the design of state school buildings in Australia from the 1880s to the 1980s to establish common threads or similar concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the design of state school buildings in Australia from the 1880s to the 1980s to establish common threads or similar concerns evident in their architecture at a national level.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher compiled a significant data set of hundreds of state schools, derived from government, professional and other publications, archival searches and site visits. Standard analytical methods in architectural research are employed, including stylistic and morphological analysis, to read the designs for meaning and intent.

Findings

The data set was interrogated to draw out major themes in school design, the identification of which form the basis of the paper's argument. Four major themes, identifiable at a national level, are identified: school as house; school as civic; school as factory; and school as town. Each theme reflects a different chronological period, being approximately 1900-1920, 1920-1940, 1940-1960 and 1960-1980. The themes reflect the changing representation of aspiration for the school child and their engagement with wider society through the architecture of the school.

Originality/value

The paper considers, for the first time, the concerns of educational architecture over time in Australia on a consciously national, rather than state, level.

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