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Article

Selma Smyly, Julie Elsworth, Judith Mann and Emma Coates

Telephone interviews were conducted with 64 participants who attended an initial systemic consultation meeting within a community‐based psychology service for people with…

Abstract

Telephone interviews were conducted with 64 participants who attended an initial systemic consultation meeting within a community‐based psychology service for people with a learning disability. Most participants found the sessions helpful and liked the reflecting conversations, which they said broadened their views on the presenting problems and offered a positive approach to the meeting, as well as enabling as many views as possible to be heard. However, depending on whether they were carers, colleagues or client and family members, participants' views varied on how prepared and comfortable they felt about the format of the meetings. The authors felt that the results lend support to the overall helpfulness of using an initial systemic consultation meeting when working with this client group.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article

Cecily May Donnelly, Julie Elsworth and Jules McKim

Following the development of the post of Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator, it was decided to assess the state of provision of Intensive Interaction within the…

Abstract

Purpose

Following the development of the post of Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator, it was decided to assess the state of provision of Intensive Interaction within the social care provision of an NHS Trust in the South of England. The purpose of this paper is to: map strengths and weaknesses of current provision; identify successful provision; identify obstacles to successful provision or factors associated with the maintenance of provision throughout the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Feedback after training sessions offered by the Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator was reviewed; data about teams supporting people needing Intensive Interaction was analysed to ensure the recommended number of people within a team had received training; opinions of managers and support workers on the provision of Intensive Interaction were gathered.

Findings

In total, 96 per cent of Trust employees thought training was right for them; 81 per cent of house teams/services had at least three staff and a manager who had received Intensive Interaction training; three areas of concern were identified from the opinions of managers and support workers: discussion of Intensive Interaction in supervision; responsibility for Intensive Interaction happening; and sharing knowledge of successful Intensive Interaction with those connected to the service user.

Originality/value

This is one of the first published audits of an Intensive Interaction service. For the Trust, it provides a baseline to allow monitoring of the maintenance of current levels of service provision over time and, following action taken to address areas of concern, whether future provision has been improved.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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Article

Peter McGill

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article

Judith Samuel and Marie Pritchard

This paper describes how one specialist learning disability health service has attempted to increase its focus on meeting the complex needs of people with profound…

Abstract

This paper describes how one specialist learning disability health service has attempted to increase its focus on meeting the complex needs of people with profound learning disability (PLD) both with and without additional physical, sensory and medical impairment. Through individual assessment and intervention, carer consultation, training and supervision, research, and audit and advice to management, a multi‐disciplinary group has influenced the development of more proactive community teams for people with learning disability. This is in the context of both the publication of Signposts for Success (NHSE, 1998) and of a changing organisational culture which has embraced essential lifestyle planning, person‐centred teams, supported living and direct payments. The challenge remains of ring‐fencing sufficient resources (of time, skill and equipment), given the high‐profile and competing demands of people with milder learning disabilities but with complex mental health needs and/or challenging behaviour.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article

Julie King, Niki Edwards, Ignacio Correa-Velez, Rosalyn Darracott and Maureen Fordyce

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of a refugee family navigating complex disability and restrictive practice service systems. Living with disability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of a refugee family navigating complex disability and restrictive practice service systems. Living with disability, or caring for someone with disability can compound the disadvantage and marginalisation already experienced by refugees. The nexus between disability and refugee status, particularly intellectual disability and restrictive practices, has received little scholarly attention and almost nothing is known of people’s experiences in this situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic analysis of a case study is used to illustrate the experiences of a refugee family in this situation. The case study presented was part of a larger ethnographic study exploring the experiences of people of refugee background living with disability.

Findings

There were numerous barriers to accessing appropriate services. The family experienced high levels of stress simultaneously navigating the resettlement process and the disability service system. They were poorly informed and disempowered regarding the care of their loved one and the use of restrictive practices. Experiences in the country of origin, employment responsibilities, and unfamiliarity with the service system were key factors in this family’s difficulty in safeguarding the rights of their family member with disability.

Originality/value

This case study examines the complexity experienced when disability intersects with refugee background. Areas for additional research and significant gaps in service provision are identified. The case study clearly demonstrates the importance of understanding people’s pre- and post-settlement experiences to inform policy and service provision.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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