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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Julie Dickinson

The aim of this study was to investigate whether perceptions of fair pay are characterised by social norms about the appropriate bases of pay differentials.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate whether perceptions of fair pay are characterised by social norms about the appropriate bases of pay differentials.

Design/methodology/approach

In order that the employees could voice their opinions without the restrictions of pre‐coded categories individual interviews were carried out with employees from five private sector organizations. The design of the study allowed an examination of attitudes towards pay criteria in the context of changes in organizational pay structures towards more individualism in pay awards.

Findings

The most popular bases of pay were “responsibility”, “qualifications” and “performance”. The attitudes appeared to reflect widespread norms about the most appropriate bases of pay. There was some evidence for an interaction between employee attitudes towards pay determination and organizational characteristics on the design and implementation of pay policies.

Research limitations/implications

The interview methodology restricted the size of the sample and consequently the generalisations that can be made from the findings. Future research could use qualitative or quantitative methods to check whether the findings replicate with different types of groups of employees.

Practical implications

The paper contains useful information for human resource practitioners about maintaining “felt fairness” in the design of new pay systems.

Originality/value

The qualitative approach of this study produces rich information about employee perceptions of pay differentials in the context of current changes towards more individualised pay determination.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Marie-Hélène Gilbert, Julie Dextras-Gauthier, Pierre-Sébastien Fournier, André Côté, Isabelle Auclair and Mouna Knani

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the difficulties encountered in the hybrid roles of physician−managers (P−Ms), examine the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the difficulties encountered in the hybrid roles of physician−managers (P−Ms), examine the impact of organizational constraints on the role conflicts experienced by P−Ms and explore the different ways their two roles are integrated.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted, using six focus groups made up of clinical co-managers, medical directors and P−Ms. In all, 43 different people were interviewed to obtain their perceptions of the day-to-day realities of the role of the P−M. The data collected were subsequently validated.

Findings

Although the expectations of the different groups involved regarding the role of P−Ms are well understood and shared, there are significant organizational constraints affecting what P−Ms are able to do in their day-to-day activities, and these constraints can result in role conflicts for the people involved. Such constraints also affect the ways P−Ms integrate the two roles. The authors identify three role hybridization profiles.

Practical implications

The results afford a better understanding of how organizational constraints might be used as levers of organizational change to achieve a better hybridization of the dual roles of P−Ms.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to reach beyond a simple identification of constraints affecting the dual roles of P−Ms by analyzing how such constraints impact on these professionals’ day-to-day activities. Results also enable us to further refine Katz and Kahn’s (1966) role model, in addition to identifying hybridization profiles.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Alina Korn

Purpose: This study is concerned with media representation of crime in the Israeli press. It examines the pattern of offenses reported in two daily newspapers of seemingly…

Abstract

Purpose: This study is concerned with media representation of crime in the Israeli press. It examines the pattern of offenses reported in two daily newspapers of seemingly different characteristics, the “elitist” Haaretz and the “popular” Israel Hayom. Methodology/approach: Crime reports appeared in the news pages during November 2016 were content analyzed in both newspapers by using a coding scheme, which operationalized several variables relating to type of crime, characteristics of offenders and victims, and court proceedings. Findings: Violent and sex offenses featured disproportionately in the news reports in both newspapers, while conventional property offenses were under-reported relative to their prevalence in official crime statistics. In terms of the characteristics of offenders and victims, the vast majority of offenders portrayed in crime stories were adult Jewish males. Women were more likely to appear as victims of crime rather than perpetrators, and more likely to appear as victims of sex offenses rather than other offenses. Research limitations: This study was based on an analysis of crime stories which appeared in two newspapers during one-month period of time. Future research should extend the sample size and collect data from a longer period of time and from additional media outlets. Originality/value: Media coverage of crime stories has not yet been researched in Israel. Beyond the interest in the Israeli case or the potential contribution to comparative global knowledge, the value of the study may lie in expanding the lens of scholarship of media’s construction of crime.

Details

Mass Mediated Representations of Crime and Criminality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-759-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Olof Brunninge, Markus Plate and Marcela Ramirez-Pasillas

Purpose – This chapter explores the m+eaning and significance of family business social responsibilities (FBSRs) using a metasystem approach, placing emphasis on the role…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores the m+eaning and significance of family business social responsibilities (FBSRs) using a metasystem approach, placing emphasis on the role of the family.

Design/Methodology/Approach – We employ a revelatory case study to investigate the complexity of family business (corporate) social responsibility. The main case, a German shoe retailer, is supplemented by other case illustrations that provide additional insights into FBSR.

Findings – To fully understand social responsibility in a family firm context, we need to include social initiatives that go beyond the actual family business as a unit. This FBSR connects family members outside and inside the business and across generations. As FBSR is formed through individual and family-level values, its character is idiosyncratic and contrasts the often standardized approaches in widely held firms.

Practical Implication – Family businesses need to go beyond the business as such when considering their engagement in social responsibility. Family ownership implies that all social initiatives conducted by family members, regardless if they are involved in the firm or not, are connected. This includes a shared responsibility for what family members do at present and have done in the past.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Avinandan Mukherjee

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Avinandan Mukherjee

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Avinandan Mukherjee and Yam Limbu

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2018

Axel Kaehne, Andrea Beacham and Julie Feather

The purpose of this paper is to outline the current thinking on co-production in health and social care, examine the challenges in implementing genuine co-production and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the current thinking on co-production in health and social care, examine the challenges in implementing genuine co-production and argue for a pragmatic version of co-production that may assist programme managers in deciding which type of co-production is most suitable for which programme.

Design/methodology/approach

A discussion paper based on the professional and academic knowledge and insights of the authors. A focus group interview schedule was used to guide discussions between authors.

Findings

The authors argue for a pragmatic approach to co-production within integrated care programmes. The authors set out the basic parameters of such an approach containing procedural rather than substantive standards for co-production activities leaving sufficient room for specific manifestations of the practice in particular contexts.

Practical implications

The authors put forward a pragmatic model of co-production that defines the essential elements of a process for ensuring services are designed to meet with the needs of patients yet allowing the process itself to be adapted to different circumstances.

Originality/value

The paper summarises the discussion on co-production in relation to integration programmes. It formulates a pragmatic model of co-production that may assist programme managers in establishing good practice co-production frameworks when designing or implementing integrated health and social care services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Jenny Billings, Rasa Mikelyte, Anna Coleman, Julie MacInnes, Pauline Allen, Sarah Croke and Kath Checkland

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of key informants on a national support programme for the development of new care models (NCM) in England…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of key informants on a national support programme for the development of new care models (NCM) in England (2015/2016–2017/2018). It focuses on the perceived facilitators and barriers affecting the development and implementation of the NCM programme and offers some insight into the role of national level support in enabling local integration initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of 29 interviews were carried out with a variety of respondents at the national level (including current and past programme leads, strategic account managers, advisors to the programme and external regulators) between October 2017 and March 2018, and analysed thematically.

Findings

A set of facilitative elements of the programme were identified: the development of relationships and alliances, strong local and national leadership, the availability of expert knowledge and skills, and additional funding. Challenges to success included perceived expectations from the national Vanguard programme, oversight and performance monitoring, engagement with regulators, data availability and quality, as well as timetables and timescales. Crucially, the facilitators and challenges were found to interact in dynamic and complex ways, which resulted in significant tensions and ambiguities within the support programme.

Research limitations/implications

While the sample was drawn from a range of different senior players and the authors ensured a diverse sample associated with the NCM support programme, it inevitably cannot be complete and there may have been valuable perspectives absent.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that the analysis of facilitators and challenges with respect to the national support of implementation of integrated care initiatives should move beyond the focus on separate influencing factors and address the tensions that the complex interplay among these factors create.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2006

Abstract

Details

Environmental Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-366-2

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