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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Juliana Thompson, Michael Hill, Lesley Bainbridge, Daniel Cowie and Emma Flewers

This paper aims to provide an evidence assessment and narrative synthesis of literature regarding the key characteristics of older people living in service-integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an evidence assessment and narrative synthesis of literature regarding the key characteristics of older people living in service-integrated housing (SIH) facilities and their “accommodation journey”.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid evidence assessment was conducted: 22 research publications met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using narrative synthesis.

Findings

The quality of studies in this area is low, but consistency across components of the results of studies included in the review is apparent. Results suggest key characteristics of older people that drive moves into SIH are a decline in health, increased dependency, increased health service use and carer burden. Suggested key characteristics of SIH residents are high levels of health problems, dependency and health service use, but high self-reported health and well-being. Results indicate that the key driver for older people leaving SIH is a lack of workforce competency to manage further declines in health and dependency status.

Research limitations/implications

Current policy may not realise or account for the complex health and care needs of SIH residents. Investment into integrated care, robust community health services and workforce development to facilitate a comprehensive assessment approach may be required to support residents to remain in SIH and live well. Further longitudinal studies are required to map the progression of SIH residents’ health status in detail over time to provide an understanding of preventative and enablement support, development of care pathways and workforce planning and development requirements.

Originality/value

This evidence assessment is the first to consider the accommodation journey of older people residing in SIH.

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady and Glenda Cook

“Experts by experience' (EBE) involvement in professional health-care education programmes contributes to developing students” caring skills by supporting students…

Abstract

Purpose

“Experts by experience' (EBE) involvement in professional health-care education programmes contributes to developing students” caring skills by supporting students’ understanding of the lived experience and reality of service-users’ situations. Also, involvement in health-care education is a beneficial experience for EBEs themselves. This study aims to explore specifically older people’s experiences and perceptions of their involvement of EBE in gerontological education to generate insight into their understanding of this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, EBEs contributing to delivery of health-care professional education programmes at a UK university took part in focus groups (n = 14) to discuss their views and experiences of involvement in EBE teaching. Data were analysed using open coding.

Findings

Four themes emerged from the data, suggesting that older EBEs’ involvement in education may be beneficial for their well-being. The four themes were “contributing to improved care”, “having a purpose”, “being included” and “feeling appreciated”.

Practical implications

Findings support the requirement for nurse educators to develop EBE programmes that involve older people as not only a teaching strategy for students but also a method of promoting the health and well-being of the older EBEs.

Originality/value

There is limited research regarding specifically older EBEs’ experiences of involvement in gerontological education. This is an important area of study because involvement in education may constitute a means of engaging in social, community and voluntary activities for older people, which recent UK health policies advocate as methods of promoting and facilitating healthy ageing.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the requirements of Health Education England's (HEE’s) ACP workforce capability framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage design was used. Stage 1 analysed health and social care workforce intelligence reports to inform scoping of numbers of ACPs working in primary care. Stage 2 used two surveys. Survey 1 targeted ACP leads and collected strategic-level data about ACP application. Survey 2 targeted staff who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs. Survey 2 was in three parts. Part 1 collected demographic data. Part 2 required participants to record their perceived competence against each of the HEE ACP framework capability criteria. Part 3 required respondents to identify facilitators and barriers to ACP practice.

Findings

Despite the introduction of HEE's ACP capability framework, there is inconsistency and confusion about the ACP role. The results indicated a need for standardisation of role definition and educational and practice requirements. The results also suggested that some ACPs are not working to their full potential, while some staff who are employed as “gap-fillers” to provide routine clinical services perceive themselves as ACPs despite not working at the ACP level.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the application of ACP practice in primary care, few studies have considered ACP application in the light of the introduction of workforce capability frameworks aimed at standardising ACP practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2021

Juliana Thompson, Glenda Cook, Claire Masterman, Mark Parkinson and Lesley Bainbridge

Different pathways of frailty care to prevent or delay progression of frailty and enable people to live well with frailty are emerging in primary and community care in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Different pathways of frailty care to prevent or delay progression of frailty and enable people to live well with frailty are emerging in primary and community care in the UK. The purpose of the study is to understand effective frailty care pathways and their components to inform future service development and pathway evaluation in primary- and community-care services.

Design/methodology/approach

A rapid evidence review was conducted: 11 research publications met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using narrative thematic synthesis.

Findings

There is strong evidence that resistance-based exercise, self-management support, community geriatric services and hospital at home (HAH) improve patient health and function. In general, evaluation and comparison of frailty care pathways, components and pathway operations is challenging due to weaknesses, inconsistencies and differences in evaluation, but it is essential to include consideration of process, determinant and implementation of pathways in evaluations.

Originality/value

To achieve meaningful evaluations and facilitate comparisons of frailty pathways, a standardised evaluation toolkit that incorporates evaluation of how pathways are operated is required for evaluating the impact of frailty pathways of care.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Juliana Thompson, Anne McNall, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and…

1163

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain primary care advanced clinical practitioners’ (ACP) perceptions and experiences of what factors influence the development and identity of ACP roles, and how development of ACP roles that align with Health Education England’s capability framework for advanced clinical practice can be facilitated in primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was located in the North of England. A qualitative approach was used in which 22 staff working in primary care who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs were interviewed. Data analysis was guided by Braun and Clarke’s (2006) six phase method.

Findings

Five themes emerged from the data – the need for: a standardised role definition and inclusive localised registration; access to/availability of quality accredited educational programmes relevant to primary care and professional development opportunities at the appropriate level; access to/availability of support and supervision for ACPs and trainee ACPs; a supportive organisational infrastructure and culture; and a clear career pathway.

Originality/value

Findings have led to the generation of the Whole System Workforce Framework of INfluencing FACTors (IN FACT), which lays out the issues that need to be addressed if ACP capability is to be maximised in primary care. This paper offers suggestions about how IN FACT can be addressed.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Chris-Valentine OGAR Eneji, Nkanu Usang Onnoghen, Joseph Odama Acha and Juliana Bebuo Diwa

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of climate change awareness among the rural farmers of Northern Cross River state, investigate the gender role analyzes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of climate change awareness among the rural farmers of Northern Cross River state, investigate the gender role analyzes of some daily routine activities carried out by these rural farmers, ascertain the difference in workload burden of the impacts of climate change between men and women, identify the strategies adopted by these rural farmers to mitigate the effects of climate change in their agricultural activities and investigate the roles Environmental Education (EE) can play in helping the rural farmers to design and adopt sustainable adaptation and mitigation strategies to reduce or completely eradicate their vulnerability to climate change effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted for this study is the cross-sectional survey method. Five research questions guided the study. Two sets of instruments were used for data collection, a sample of 1,258 respondents (0.1%) were selected for the study. The researchers personally administered the instruments and collected the same back, two instruments were not properly filled, so they were rejected.

Findings

The finding of the study revealed that rural farmers have some level of climate change awareness, which they got from radio, newspapers, awareness campaigns, flyers, billboards, among others. Six out of the nine strategies listed were adopted by the rural farmers to mitigate climate change effects among these rural farmers. There is a significant difference in gender workload burden between women and male in the area, the result is positively skewed toward women, implying that the burden of workload for women increased over those of men. The result also shows that EE can influence their attitude toward climate change through awareness creation, knowledge provisions and also encourage members participation in climate change effect mitigation, prevention and adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

With this result, EE can be used as a tool for the creation of knowledge, awareness, attitude and encourage the participation of these rural farmers toward mitigating and prevention climate change effects among these rural farmers. It was recommended among others that deliberate policies should be designed to make EE help create the needed awareness on climate change, beginning from the causes, effects and mitigation strategies among rural farmers in their community.

Practical implications

Already, most Environmental Educators have been trained, the government should design and formulate practical policies to use them as extension agent on climate change effort to go to these rural communities and create the needed awareness, knowledge, skills and attitude to help them combat climate change effects including trees and cover crops planting and also re-introducing the use of irrigation agriculture in these farming communities.

Social implications

With the creation of awareness, social groups and individuals can also make a social investment from these activities and also improve their social capitals, thereby reducing social burdens and improving their living conditions within the rural settings.

Originality/value

This research is an original research paper from the effort. the purpose is to assess the extent of climate change awareness level and how the effects of climate change increase or reduces the burden of gender workload among rural farmers and the strategies which can be used by these rural farmers to prevent, mitigate and adapt to climate change effects and the roles EE can play. This study has an original value in the sense that in the course of the study, the study hardly saw articles on these specific variables in whole research, hence the resolve to assess these variables.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 13 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Juliana Bonomi Santos and Sandro Cabral

This paper explores how public buyers' capabilities promote collaboration with private suppliers to obtain enhanced performance in complex projects.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores how public buyers' capabilities promote collaboration with private suppliers to obtain enhanced performance in complex projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two case studies on the procurement of complex military projects by the Brazilian armed forces involving public buyers and private suppliers. The authors followed the Gioia methodology to inductively analyze data from interviews, official documents, media articles and project meeting notes.

Findings

The authors identified public procurement capabilities that are antecedents of collaborative trust-based relationships with suppliers in complex public-private projects. The authors unpack these capabilities in three subsets: abilities to manage the bidding and contracting process, to handle relationships with prominent stakeholders, such as audit control bodies and to manage knowledge acquired within and across current and past projects. By developing these capabilities, public buyers can build collaborative trust-based relationships with suppliers, which enable the conciliation of operational performance (i.e. on-time delivery, budget and scope compliance) and policy goals (i.e. inclusion of local suppliers in supply chains).

Originality/value

The authors extend the literature on the enablers of trust and collaboration in buyer-supplier relationships by providing a detailed account of which capabilities are necessary on the buyer side in complex projects, especially when accountability standards create barriers for collaborative practices. The authors also reinforce the importance of the operations and supply chain management scholarship in policy debates by showing how buyer-supplier interactions can create value in complex projects with public and private sectors.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Juliana Mohok McLaughlin

This chapter examines the usefulness of the field of comparative and international education (CIE) in reference to supporting and informing the development of education in…

Abstract

This chapter examines the usefulness of the field of comparative and international education (CIE) in reference to supporting and informing the development of education in the Pacific Islands (Oceania) region. Accordingly, it reconsiders the conceptualization and practice of the field by unpacking understandings of CIE with specific reference to the Pacific Islands. I argue that advancing the field in Oceania entails critical examination of context, of persisting colonial legacies in education and the broader social, economic, and political landscape. Considerations of these discourses identify some of the tensions, contradictions, and ambivalences that eventuate as “education for national development” is reconciled with indigenous knowledges and the intellectual traditions that sustain Pacific island communities. Adopting a postcolonial perspective, this chapter explores recent educational initiatives in Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and Solomon Islands. These initiatives reveal the complexities and multifaceted dynamics that underpin the context of Pacific Islands systems of education. They also reflect how Pacific educational leaders negotiate global imperatives for education while observing indigenous knowledge systems and cultural values. The lessons drawn from these case studies suggest that comparative education scholars need to rethink partnerships with colleagues and neighbors in consideration of Pacific and indigenous (including Australia and New Zealand) cultural protocols of engagement by honoring respect and reciprocity, mutual benefit, and empowerment. Such conceptual and practical reconsiderations may facilitate an assessment of the impact of western intellectual contributions on systems of education in Oceania.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2017
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-765-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2008

Juliana Mansvelt

With the so-called greying of many nations, ageing is becoming a critical issue for social and urban policy (Polivka & Longino, 2004). While populations may be ageing…

Abstract

With the so-called greying of many nations, ageing is becoming a critical issue for social and urban policy (Polivka & Longino, 2004). While populations may be ageing chronologically in many countries, notions of ageing and ‘the elderly’ are shifting – influenced by economic, political and cultural changes. People are living longer, and are living more diverse and flexible lives. The shape of their lives is changing in relation to factors such as government policy, the economy, leisure and work practice, and the giving and receiving of care (OECD, 1996). Such changes pose challenges for policy makers as these societal shifts have both social and spatial consequences. ‘Ageing’ is consequently a concept which needs unpacking in order to make informed decisions about planning and public policy – to understand how the concept of age is shaped, negotiated and experienced differentially in place (Williams & Ylanne-McEwen, 2000). This chapter shows how the personal stories and experiences of older individuals form narratives which can both shape and challenge policy makers’ views of ageing and place relationships.

Details

Qualitative Urban Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1368-6

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2008

Paul J. Maginn, Susan M. Thompson and Matthew Tonts

The end of the twentieth century was filled with an ironic mix of panic and fatalism; together with optimism and hope. ‘Digital armageddon’ in the form of the Y2K bug was…

Abstract

The end of the twentieth century was filled with an ironic mix of panic and fatalism; together with optimism and hope. ‘Digital armageddon’ in the form of the Y2K bug was reportedly on the horizon (Vulliamy, 2000), but as we know, never transpired. If, however, Y2K had materialised and affected technology as predicted, the consequences would have had profound macro and micro impacts – economically, politically, socially and spatially. Cities – with their super-concentration of technological infrastructure, hardware and software – would arguably have endured the brunt of this catastrophe. Had this disaster occurred, its reach would have been well beyond the city, spiralling out from the CBD to the suburbs, rural settlements, jumping national boundaries, and ultimately bringing economic, transport and communication systems to a near halt, rendering day-to-day living experiences unbearable, if not virtually impossible.

Details

Qualitative Urban Analysis: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1368-6

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