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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1993

Gordon Wills and Julian Wills

Compares the launch and development, by an academic publishinghouse, of three marketing clubs, two of which were focused on customersand the third on authors/editors…

Abstract

Compares the launch and development, by an academic publishing house, of three marketing clubs, two of which were focused on customers and the third on authors/editors. Promotional campaigns achieved good results but, most importantly, the marketing intelligence gained transformed the organization′s marketing structures. Fresh objectives for future growth were identified and computer systems further developed.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 11 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Gordon Wills and Julian Wills

The emergence of marketing clubs has been made possible by databasetechnology. Reviews the published literature in depth and categorizesclubs from suspects to regular…

Abstract

The emergence of marketing clubs has been made possible by database technology. Reviews the published literature in depth and categorizes clubs from suspects to regular subscribers. Analyses three new clubs launched by MCB University Press for readers and authors showing achievements to date.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Julian Wills

In contrast to predominantly academic approaches to learning, action learning based qualifications emphasise learning centered upon the workplace. By facilitating a…

Abstract

In contrast to predominantly academic approaches to learning, action learning based qualifications emphasise learning centered upon the workplace. By facilitating a process by which workplace learning is conceptualized and placed in an academic context, action learning based qualifications are well suited to provide a link between academic knowledge of core managerial disciplines and the context within which such skills are demonstrated. This paper outlines a credit mapping approach developed by the IMC Association which enables workplace and professional development courses to form the basis of certificated awards at the Action Learning Certificate in Management Studies (Action Learning CMS) level. The strength of the approach is that it addresses the demand for adaptive and responsive adult educational provision which is not restricted by the site of learning or the age or circumstances of the student. An important caveat is that the rules and guidance by which credit can be accumulated and transferred are vitally important in order to facilitate understanding of the process, coherent patterns of study for students and to safeguard academic standards. The process of credit mapping and validating workplace learning has the potential to improve access to higher postgraduate awards and add value to both the consumer and supplier of workplace training courses.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Armen E. Petrosyan

This paper aims to retrace the genesis of private share company in Ancient Rome as one of the greatest innovation in the history of management.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to retrace the genesis of private share company in Ancient Rome as one of the greatest innovation in the history of management.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on a thorough and systematic analysis of the available historical material, and modern research, the author reconstructs the first known form of private share company and the way it came into being under late Republic and early Empire.

Findings

The scope of commercial partnerships and bounds preventing them from concentration of capitals are shown. The popular myth of private corporations allegedly existing in Ancient Rome is debunked. The author reveals how existing business elements (union of co-owners, the module “slave – peculium – free administration” from individual enterprise, and the principle of inseparability of joint ownership) had been combined to form private share company. Are demonstrated its chief differences from corporation, and the untenability of attempts to deny the real existence of private share companies in Ancient Rome. By way of summing up, the pattern of innovations is brought into relief.

Research limitations/implications

The material opens new vistas for historians and allows them to draw an exacter and more comprehensive picture of Roman private entrepreneurship. Experts in management get an opportunity to retrace the background of modern forms of business organizing. A broader circle of researchers may see what the real path of radical novelties – from the need for them to their implementation – is. And altogether, the author’s conclusions provide scholars with a key to understanding breakthrough phenomena of history.

Practical implications

The results obtained may be used in many courses related to the history of economics, business, management, innovations, etc. Besides, they allow practitioners to discern plainly the origins of new business forms and learn how to make for them or facilitate their growth.

Social implications

The author's conception of viable novelties sheds light on the processes of social development and modernization. It may serve as an effective instrument in planning reforms and managing them.

Originality/value

The framework of Roman private share company and many allied issues are investigated for the first time. This type of enterprise is presented as a response to the functional request from private entrepreneurs. That is why the new organizational form, despite its radical nature, proved to be quite efficient, and caught on in business. The author infers from his findings a generalized pattern of innovations able to get integrated into reality.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Understanding Decision-Making in Educational Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-818-0

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Julian Duxfield, Regional Human Resources Director for G4S, the world's leading international security solutions

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an interview with Julian Duxfield, Regional Human Resources Director for G4S, the world's leading international security solutions group, which specializes in outsourced business processes in sectors where security and safety risks are considered a strategic threat.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent interviewer.

Findings

The paper reveals that Julian brings with him an extensive knowledge of G4S, having previously worked for G4S Cash Solutions as its HR Director for the past three years. Julian has had a wide ranging career in human resources (HR) spanning both the public and private sectors having been the HR Director for the Department of Transport and Carlsberg UK, as well as carrying out a number of HR management roles at Unilever plc.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

Having worked within both the public and private sector, Julian is able to offer valuable insight into the role of HR within different types of organizations and highlights how a strong brand can influence employee engagement. He also discusses some of the key challenges facing HR professionals today, and offers advice on measuring the well being of your staff.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Julian Wills

Discusses the concept of waste management as opposed to wastedisposal – as the way in which organizations deal with their waste– through the introduction of the…

2007

Abstract

Discusses the concept of waste management as opposed to waste disposal – as the way in which organizations deal with their waste – through the introduction of the Environmental Protection Act (EPA) 1990 Part II which replaced the Control of Pollution Act (COPA) 1974. Examines the problems of the COPA and defines the benefits of the EPA which gives the new waste regulation authorities (WRAs) extensive powers such as the granting/revoking of licences to operators, the aim being the control of the waste management process. Also examines other features of the Act such as public registers and environmental auditing, and takes a look at the future prospects of waste management.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Julian Wills and C.J.F.P. Jones

Describes integrated pollution control, the legal regime established by the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Gives the background to the need for an integrated system of…

1349

Abstract

Describes integrated pollution control, the legal regime established by the Environmental Protection Act 1990. Gives the background to the need for an integrated system of regulation. Explains the concepts of best practicable environmental option and best available techniques not entailing excessive cost. Discusses the way in which the regime attempts to control pollution in terms of the authorization and variation process and through enforcement. Describes the way the regime attempts to utilize market forces. Outlines some of the problems encountered by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Pollution (HMIP) in the operation of the regime.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1938

Those who contemplate attending the Annual Conference of the Library Association at Portsmouth would be well advised to secure their accommodation immediately if they have…

Abstract

Those who contemplate attending the Annual Conference of the Library Association at Portsmouth would be well advised to secure their accommodation immediately if they have not done so already. The demands upon hotel space have been very much greater than even sanguine members anticipated, and already we hear of people being refused rooms because they are no longer available. Portsmouth, of course, is the naval centre of the Empire, and that common‐place piece of knowledge is magnetic, nevertheless. There are other attractions in Portsmouth. Its situation, practically adjacent to the Isle of Wight, with all its charms, on one side, and its nearness to the New Forest and the belt of Hampshire towns on the west, and on the east with such places as Chichester, Selsey, Bognor, Worthing, and Brighton make it, from the location point of view, of special interest. There is the further call of the literary associations of Portsmouth. Every book on the Navy has something about it, as those of us who read W. H. G. Kingston, Captain Marryatt and many another sea‐author can testify. Perhaps the most important author who came out of Portsmouth was not a sea‐writer but the son of a naval outfitter—George Meredith. Pernaps to a post‐War generation he seems old‐fashioned, involved, unnecessarily intricate, precious, and possesses other faults. This is a superficial point of view, and certainly in his poems he rises to heights and reaches depths that are denied to most writers of to‐day. In any case, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel and Beauchamp's Career, to say nothing of The Egoist, are among the great novels of the English language.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gordon Wills

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplacelearning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates whatit has already achieved and from this…

Abstract

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplace learning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates what it has already achieved and from this moves on to realize its full potential – in short, the enterprise itself is the key. Examines in successive chapters: the individual manager and questioning insights (Q); the major systems which the enterprise uses to capture and structure its learning; a SWOT analysis of the enterprise′s total learning; action learning, its contribution to the achievement of enterprise growth, and the role of programmed knowledge (P); the Enterprise School of Management (ESM) as a phoenix of enlightenment and effectiveness rising from the ashes of traditional, less effective management training initiatives; and, finally, the practical realization of the action learning dream, as evidenced by emerging examples of successful and profitable implementation worldwide. Concludes with a selection of pertinent abstracts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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