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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Ulrike Gretzel, Jamie Murphy, Juho Pesonen and Casey Blanton

This paper aims to provide a perspective on food waste by tourists and tourist households, now and in the future.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a perspective on food waste by tourists and tourist households, now and in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a perspective article that summarizes contemporary thinking about food waste and conceptualizes food waste specifically for tourist household settings.

Findings

In tourism, food is more than nourishment and extends to visitor experiences and attractions. Yet food waste arising from tourism activity is a major environmental and societal issue. Festive moods and holiday spirits – synonymous with over-sized portions, bountiful buffets and entertainment excess – exacerbate food waste. Cultural norms that portray food waste as a sign of good hospitality further aggravate the problem. This paper argues that efforts to reduce food waste in tourism require new conceptualizations of tourist households, and where food waste occurs in relation to tourism, and of who should be responsible for preventing and managing food waste.

Research limitations/implications

The tourism industry faces ever-growing economical, societal and legislative reasons to address food waste, which are dynamic and difficult to predict.

Practical implications

Savvy meal providers will migrate towards reducing their food waste or turning it into assets. However, a focus on preventing food waste only in traditional food service and accommodation establishments ignores the reality of growing tourist households and will stifle sustainability efforts unless theoretically unpacked and practically addressed.

Social implications

A third of food produced globally is lost or wasted. Stark facts, proclamations and regulations underscore food waste as a burgeoning global problem with major environmental, social and economic costs.

Originality/value

Food waste, in general, and by tourists, is a burgeoning environmental, social and economic challenge. This is one of the first articles to focus on this topic and introduces the concept of tourist households.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Juho Pesonen, Raija Komppula, Christopher Kronenberg and Mike Peters

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from tourists visiting rural tourism companies in Finland and in Tyrol (Austria). The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and correlation coefficients.

Findings

The results indicate significant differences of push and pull motivations in the two regions. In addition, tourists motivated by different variables obviously search for different destination attributes. For example, tourists motivated by the search of a once‐in‐a‐lifetime experience expect different destination attributes than those respondents searching for a sense of comfort or an opportunity to relax.

Research limitations/implications

The low sample size in both Tyrol and Finland reduces the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by rural tourism companies and practitioners to understand how push and pull motivations affect tourist behaviour. Based on this information, marketing initiatives can be customized for various target segments in this particular market.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the inter‐relationship between push and pull motivations in rural tourism and one of the most detailed studies on rural tourist motivations. Additionally, the comparison of the two countries underlines the assumption, that cultural or macro‐economic variables strongly influence push and pull motivations of consumers.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Juho Antti Pesonen

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have had a profound impact on tourism marketing. For several decades one of the cornerstones of marketing has been market…

5113

Abstract

Purpose

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have had a profound impact on tourism marketing. For several decades one of the cornerstones of marketing has been market segmentation. The purpose of this paper is to examine how ICTs have affected market segmentation literature in tourism by the means of literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

All segmentation articles published in Journal of Travel Research, Tourism Management and Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing since the year 2000 are reviewed by examining how ICTs have affected them. Content analysis is used to categorize the connection between ICTs and segmentation to seven categories.

Findings

Only three papers focusing on both ICT and segmentation were found among the 188 segmentation‐related studies reviewed. Altogether 58 market segmentation studies found were affected by ICTs but in most cases the effects are very limited.

Research limitations/implications

Only three tourism journals were reviewed making it possible that some studies connected to the topic are not examined in this review.

Practical implications

This study provides practitioners with a review of central findings regarding ICT use in market segmentation process published in recent academic literature.

Originality/value

This is the first study to review how ICTs have affected market segmentation in tourism. It provides a review of central papers discussing the topic and directions for future research. Overall, this research highlights the lack of research on the topic, as well as its importance for the future of tourism marketing.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Christian Laesser

397

Abstract

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Michael James Ormshaw, Sami Petteri Kokko, Jari Villberg and Lasse Kannas

The purpose of this paper is to utilise the collective opinion of a group of Finnish experts to identify the most important learning outcomes of secondary-level…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise the collective opinion of a group of Finnish experts to identify the most important learning outcomes of secondary-level school-based health education, in the specific domains of physical activity and nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a Delphi survey technique to collect the opinions of a group (panel) of Finnish experts. A list of learning outcomes was compiled via an extensive literature review of documents from all levels of health education (physical activity and nutrition) policy development and implementation. A general inductive analysis method was conducted, resulting in education themes which were then compiled into health literacy-constructed learning outcomes to present to the panel in the two Delphi rounds.

Findings

The study question is answered in the form of a ranked list of the 24 most important learning outcomes of physical activity and nutrition education in Finnish schools. The analysis of variance pair-wise comparisons with Bonferroni indicated that six items were statistically possibly more important than the 18 others. The three most important items being: first, understand the importance of a varied and balanced diet; second, the ability to analyse their own lifestyle; third, understand the link between physical activity and health. The study also identified topics/themes which could be either under-represented or over-represented in the current literature and teaching.

Originality/value

This study is the only one of its type, and researches an as yet unknown area of health education. The value of this study lies in its role in the further development of school health education, in terms of identifying the “most important” contemporary issues to teach in the classroom, and may also be used as a topic prioritisation and curriculum planning tool.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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