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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Carole Parkes, Judy Scully, Michael West and Jeremy Dawson

This paper sets out to contribute to the advancement of knowledge, particularly with regard to the processes of implementation and the role of managers engaged in such…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to contribute to the advancement of knowledge, particularly with regard to the processes of implementation and the role of managers engaged in such high commitment strategies and work practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is part of a research project investigating the extent to which employee involvement predicts job performance (as well as job satisfaction, wellbeing and organisational commitment) in the NHS, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The main focus of this paper is to present evidence from four of the 20 case studies to show the barriers to implementing employee involvement as well as highlighting the techniques and practices that have proven to be most successful.

Findings

Employee involvement is used successfully by management and has enabled frontline staff to contribute their knowledge to their work. Research limitations/implications – The ethical issues of confidentiality and anonymity permeated the research process throughout.

Practical implications

The link between “high commitment” strategies and organisational performance is of great interest to academics and practitioners alike. One of these “high commitment” strategies, namely employee involvement, has been an important HR strategy for the NHS in the UK.

Originality/value

Other organisations can learn from the findings by implementing the successful parts.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Carole Parkes, Judy Scully and Susan Anson

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the conceptual lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), business and civil society can be used to explore “less…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the conceptual lens of corporate social responsibility (CSR), business and civil society can be used to explore “less popular causes” (in this case, a community‐based public sector empirical study of initiatives with offenders) and, in particular, respond to the question used by Walzer “In which society can lives be best led?”

Design/methodology/approach

This is a formative and summative evaluation study of a National Offender Management “community payback” offender scheme based in the UK using a mixed method, predominantly qualitative approach that integrates theory and practice.

Findings

The paper finds that citizenship actions of front‐line public sector employees, working in partnership with other agencies in the community, embody the essence of Walzer's notion of CSR and civil society by going beyond the call of duty to provide additional training and moral support for the community offenders.

Originality/value

The paper contributes towards an understanding of how CSR and civil society debates can inform wider aspects of public policy and business through its application to areas of society that are perceived to be “challenging” and “undeserving”.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Vincent Cassar and Judy W. Scully

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in…

Abstract

Purpose

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in achieving effective interdisciplinary team working, which is explicitly declared in the mission statement of a 60-bed acute rehabilitative geriatric hospital in Malta.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the above-mentioned key stakeholders.

Findings

Three main distinct yet interdependent themes emerged as a result of thematic analysis: “managing a team-friendly hospital”, “interdisciplinary team components”, and “interdisciplinary team processes”. The findings show that visibility of management support and its alignment with the process and content levels of interdisciplinary teamwork are key to integrated care for acute rehabilitative geriatric patients.

Research limitations/implications

The emerging phenomena may not be reproducible in a different context; although many of the emerging themes could be comfortably matched with the existing literature.

Practical implications

The implications are geared towards raising the consciousness and conscientiousness of good practice in interdisciplinary teamwork in hospitals, as well as in emphasizing organizational and management support as crucial factors for team-based organizations.

Social implications

Interdisciplinary teamwork in acute rehabilitative geriatrics provides optimal quality and integrated health care delivery with the aim that the older persons are successfully discharged back to the community.

Originality/value

The authors draw on solid theoretical frameworks – the complexity theory, team effectiveness model and the social identity theory – to support their major finding, namely the alignment of organizational and management support with intra-team factors at the process and content level.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Judi Marshall

This paper seeks to review the potential gendering of leadership in the emerging field of corporate social responsibility (CSR). It explores whose voices are becoming…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the potential gendering of leadership in the emerging field of corporate social responsibility (CSR). It explores whose voices are becoming dominant, how leaders speak, and what forms men's and women's leadership take.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a self‐reflective inquiry, analysing observational and secondary data to explore leadership and its gender patterning. It reflects on its approach and the voice in which it is written.

Findings

Women and men are often differently placed to work within the emerging dominant logics of CSR. The gender patternings considered are skewed rather than clear‐cut. In relation to organization‐based discourses and practices, leadership is dominated by white men. Some men are tempered radicals, inside‐outsiders acting for change. Some women leaders question the foundations of business and global power relations, and point to fundamental gender inequalities. Whilst they are recognised figures, they are operating at the margins, self‐identified as activists. Other influential women provide training in the alternative practices of leadership they advocate. Systemic theories of gendering are employed to review these findings.

Originality/value

Explores some of the dynamics through which leadership can become gendered, in the challenging realm of how ecological sustainability and global social justice are addressed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Judi Marshall

Reflects on different qualities of mind that organizations can develop. Suggests that some previously muted ways of knowing – including more appreciation of…

Abstract

Reflects on different qualities of mind that organizations can develop. Suggests that some previously muted ways of knowing – including more appreciation of interdependence, system patterns, contexts and emotions – are now being developed, expanding learning capacities. Argues that there are constraints on these developments because some changes are happening more in name than in practice, and because system resilience is maintaining preferences for control and action. Offers reformulated visions of leadership which might enhance organizational learning in the face of such restrictions; points to needs for congruence of approach and intention. Challenges traditional notions of leadership as hierarchical.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Charles B. Osburn

Corporate culture is a spirit formed by the shared values of the individuals in the organization that has potential to make the library more than the sum of its parts…

Abstract

Corporate culture is a spirit formed by the shared values of the individuals in the organization that has potential to make the library more than the sum of its parts, both positively and negatively. It is the vehicle by which the organization defines itself, for both itself and the clientele, with the purpose of providing the best service possible by sharing a vision of the organization as an organic whole. It operates through the power of peer influence rather than direct vertical authority. This paper takes a holistic approach to a concept that is more complex than it first appears; it addresses the molding of corporate culture, not as a management function, but as a complex and deep system, being in effect the soul of the organization, which resides in the motivation of each individual and which, therefore, requires a special kind of leadership.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1488-1

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Shamas‐ur‐Rehman Toor and George Ofori

Recent research on leadership has focused on the exploration of the taxonomies of leadership antecedents (or “trigger events”) that significantly influence the development…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research on leadership has focused on the exploration of the taxonomies of leadership antecedents (or “trigger events”) that significantly influence the development of the attributes of leadership in individuals. These leadership antecedents – which may involve individuals, social institutions, and life experiences – constitute a worthwhile topic for research. This paper aims to report a study which explores the leadership antecedents that inspired leadership development among graduate project management students.

Design/methodology/approach

To ascertain the significance of leadership antecedents, a study was conducted at National University of Singapore. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data on taxonomies of various leadership antecedents which contributed to the development of leadership skills among the subjects. Of a total of 90 questionnaires, which were distributed, 58 completed questionnaires were received.

Findings

The results suggest that teachers, parents, and mentors are significant in the development of leadership among the emergent leaders. It was also noted that educational and occupational experiences play a central role in leadership development. Future studies can use qualitative approaches, especially grounded theory methodology, to develop comprehensive frameworks explaining leadership development process.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this exploratory study can form the basis for further work in the field of leadership development.

Originality/value

The taxonomy of leadership antecedents employed in this study can be used to design controlled interventions for leadership development in emergent project leaders and project management trainees.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jennifer Anne de Vries

The purpose of this paper is to examine male and female executives as leaders “championing” gender change interventions. It problematizes current exhortations for male…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine male and female executives as leaders “championing” gender change interventions. It problematizes current exhortations for male leaders to lead gender change, much as they might lead any other business-driven change agenda. It argues that organizational gender scholarship is critical to understanding the gendered nature of championing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a feminist qualitative research project examining the efficacy of a gender intervention in a university and a policing institution. Interviews with four leaders have been chosen from the larger study for analysis against the backdrop of material from interviewees and the participant observation of the researcher. It brings a social constructionist view of gender and Acker’s gendering processes to bear on understanding organizational gender change.

Findings

The sex/gender of the leader is inescapably fore-fronted by the gender change intervention. Gendered expectations and choices positioned men as powerful and effective champions while undermining the effectiveness of the woman in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Further research examining male and female leaders capacity to champion gender change is required.

Practical implications

This research identifies effective champion behaviors, provides suggestions for ensuring that gender equity interventions are well championed and proposes a partnership model where senior men and women play complementary roles leading gender change.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to practitioners and scholars. It draws attention to contemporary issues of leadership and gender change, seeking to bridge the gap between theory and practice that undermines our change efforts.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-371-3

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