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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Judy McKay and Peter Marshall

Action research (AR) is not without its critics, and those who reject some of the paradigmatic assumptions embodied in AR maintain that AR is little more than consultancy…

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Abstract

Action research (AR) is not without its critics, and those who reject some of the paradigmatic assumptions embodied in AR maintain that AR is little more than consultancy, that it is impossible to establish causal relationships, that it is difficult to generalize from AR studies, that there is a risk of researcher bias, and that generally speaking, it lacks some of the key qualities that are normally associated with rigorous research. The authors are sensitive to such criticisms, for although they are committed action researchers, they have elsewhere voiced their concerns about the quality of AR practice in the field of information systems. The authors argue that part of the issue concerns the way in which we currently conceptualize AR. In this article, the argument for a deeper and more reflective analysis of the meaning and full implications of AR is developed, culminating in a model of AR being developed that explicitly includes both a problem solving interest cycle and a research interest cycle. Important implications of this new model are articulated, with examples to illustrate these points being drawn from a real‐life AR study.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Ned Kock and Francis Lau

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1296

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Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2008

C.J.H. Mann

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218

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Kybernetes, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

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107

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Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Dean Bowman

This chapter seeks to reassess the film GoldenEye (Campbell, 1995), and its highly successful (Impellizeri, 2010) videogame adaptation GoldenEye 007 (Rare, 1997), in light…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to reassess the film GoldenEye (Campbell, 1995), and its highly successful (Impellizeri, 2010) videogame adaptation GoldenEye 007 (Rare, 1997), in light of the concept of the Hegemony of Play (Fron, Fullerton, Morie, & Pearce, 2007), which seeks to critique the dominance of the hypermasculine ‘gamer’ identity in videogame culture (a persona GoldenEye anticipates in its problematic character Boris Grishenko).

Since the gamer is bound up in the very technological materiality of videogames as a medium and an industry (Dyer-Witheford & de Peuter, 2009), central to this discussion is the significant yet highly ambivalent role technology continues to play in the Bond films, both extending and threatening (Leach, 2015; Nitins, 2010) Bond’s natural male skill and intuition (McGowan, 2010). Indeed, GoldenEye is a particularly salient study since many suggest Brosnan to be the most technologically adept (or dependent) of the Bonds (Rositzka, 2015; Willis, 2003), and I will argue that the film and game together explore just what happens when Bond’s implacable force meets the immutable technological object, providing a fascinating lens through which to read the larger technocultural shifts embodied in the transition to the immaterial economies of cognitive capitalism (Hardt & Negri, 2001) and their potential to disrupt traditional, patriarchal gender configurations (Haraway, 1991; Hayles, 2005; Plant, 1998; Wajcman, 2004).

Core to this is a critical reading of the game’s popular multiplayer mode, where exploration of whether technology can be understood to potentially level the gender playing field (Jones, 2015) or whether the fact that such technology is always already encoded as masculine (Chess, 2017) ultimately undercuts this ambition.

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From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

Cary L. Cooper and Judi Marshall

Introduction Working in organisations not only provides a large section of the population with life‐sustaining income, but also exerts its own pressures and stresses on…

Abstract

Introduction Working in organisations not only provides a large section of the population with life‐sustaining income, but also exerts its own pressures and stresses on them, which can ultimately have negative consequences both for achieving the goals of organisations and meeting the needs of the individuals working within them. Before we examine the various sources of pressure and stress at work, it might be useful to define these two central concepts. “Pressure” is an external or internal force acting on an individual to perform in a particular way or achieve a particular end result. This can be a source of some discomfort and some anxiety, but it can be at the same time exciting, challenging, and growth‐producing. “Stress”, on the other hand, has only negative outcomes for the individual concerned because (1) the individual feels that he or she will not (in the long term) be able to cope, and therefore (2) will find it necessary to deal with it in a defensive and maladaptive way. Pressure is a tolerable, manageable condition, includes some positive attributes, and is characterised by activity and productive coping; stress is a regressive and counter‐productive condition, can produce extreme and usually undifferentiated anxiety, and is characterised by defensive coping.

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Management Decision, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Michael H. Abel is the manager for Domain Quality and Development at Western Governors University (WGU) in the United States and assists faculty in developing detailed…

Abstract

Michael H. Abel is the manager for Domain Quality and Development at Western Governors University (WGU) in the United States and assists faculty in developing detailed descriptions of the domains of knowledge, skill, and ability that serve as the basis for academic program and assessment development. As a co-developer of the WGU Teachers College assessment programs, Michael designed specialized databases for standards alignment and domain development and created and administered training for test item writers and editors. He also served as senior assessment developer and editor when the WGU Teachers College assessment program went university wide. Michael received an MA in International Relations from the University of Southern California and a BA in German from Brigham Young University. He is co-author of a test item development guide, The Art of Item Development.

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Tensions in Teacher Preparation: Accountability, Assessment, and Accreditation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-100-9

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Judy Waight and Juan M. Madera

A growing body of research demonstrates that diversity training can be successful in improving attitudes and behaviors towards ethnic minorities but, very little research…

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3589

Abstract

Purpose

A growing body of research demonstrates that diversity training can be successful in improving attitudes and behaviors towards ethnic minorities but, very little research focuses on the effects of diversity training on ethnic minorities' attitudes. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to examine ethnic differences in organizational attitudes as a function of offering diversity training.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey methodology, 186 students majoring in hotel and restaurant management that were part‐ or full‐time employees at a hospitality operation were requested to participate. Participants were forwarded an e‐mail with the link to the survey that contained the measures of interests, as well as demographic questions, control variables, and a debriefing statement.

Findings

The results showed that offering diversity training at the workplace had a significant effect for ethnic minorities' job satisfaction, perceived workplace discrimination, and turnover intentions, but this effect was not found for majority‐member participants. Perceived workplace discrimination mediated the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides support that diversity training is a tool that can have a positive impact on ethnic minority employees, while not negatively affecting Caucasian employees.

Originality/value

Very little research examines why diversity training works. This research shows that by offering diversity training, organizations potentially send signals to their employees that a diverse workforce is important.

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Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

James Poon Teng Fatt

Aims to understand a group learning style so that teachers can best adapt their teaching style and materials to suit the students. Defines learning styles and briefly…

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4418

Abstract

Aims to understand a group learning style so that teachers can best adapt their teaching style and materials to suit the students. Defines learning styles and briefly covers previous findings in this area. Looks at different types of thinking before covering how to assess learning styles using a questionnaire. Provides some implications for educators and looks at the design of assignments which can be tailored in different ways depending upon the findings.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 20 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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