Search results

1 – 10 of 165
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Rettig

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all of our…

Abstract

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all of our expenses for a long weekend at a resort hotel; the only condition of the grant was that we offer our results to Reference Services Review for first publication. Over the past five years each of the seventeen had in turn accepted my challenge to answer the following question:

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Judith Samuel

207

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Judith Samuel and Marie Pritchard

This paper describes how one specialist learning disability health service has attempted to increase its focus on meeting the complex needs of people with profound learning…

509

Abstract

This paper describes how one specialist learning disability health service has attempted to increase its focus on meeting the complex needs of people with profound learning disability (PLD) both with and without additional physical, sensory and medical impairment. Through individual assessment and intervention, carer consultation, training and supervision, research, and audit and advice to management, a multi‐disciplinary group has influenced the development of more proactive community teams for people with learning disability. This is in the context of both the publication of Signposts for Success (NHSE, 1998) and of a changing organisational culture which has embraced essential lifestyle planning, person‐centred teams, supported living and direct payments. The challenge remains of ring‐fencing sufficient resources (of time, skill and equipment), given the high‐profile and competing demands of people with milder learning disabilities but with complex mental health needs and/or challenging behaviour.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Michelle McCarthy

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Steven Carnaby

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Paul Cambridge

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Gloria Agyemang, Brendan O’Dwyer and Jeffrey Unerman

The purpose of this paper is to offer a retrospective and prospective analysis of the themes explored in the 2006 Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal special issue on…

2867

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a retrospective and prospective analysis of the themes explored in the 2006 Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal special issue on non-governmental organisation (NGO) accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a reflective review essay.

Findings

The paper outlines how a number of themes in the 2006 special issue addressing downward accountability, hierarchical accountability and management control have been subsequently developed in a selection of papers from the accounting literature. The development of these themes leads to several suggestions for future research in NGO accountability.

Originality/value

The paper offers a systematic, original perspective on recent developments in certain areas of the field of NGO accountability.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Cecily May Donnelly, Julie Elsworth and Jules McKim

Following the development of the post of Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator, it was decided to assess the state of provision of Intensive Interaction within the social care…

Abstract

Purpose

Following the development of the post of Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator, it was decided to assess the state of provision of Intensive Interaction within the social care provision of an NHS Trust in the South of England. The purpose of this paper is to: map strengths and weaknesses of current provision; identify successful provision; identify obstacles to successful provision or factors associated with the maintenance of provision throughout the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Feedback after training sessions offered by the Trust Intensive Interaction Co-ordinator was reviewed; data about teams supporting people needing Intensive Interaction was analysed to ensure the recommended number of people within a team had received training; opinions of managers and support workers on the provision of Intensive Interaction were gathered.

Findings

In total, 96 per cent of Trust employees thought training was right for them; 81 per cent of house teams/services had at least three staff and a manager who had received Intensive Interaction training; three areas of concern were identified from the opinions of managers and support workers: discussion of Intensive Interaction in supervision; responsibility for Intensive Interaction happening; and sharing knowledge of successful Intensive Interaction with those connected to the service user.

Originality/value

This is one of the first published audits of an Intensive Interaction service. For the Trust, it provides a baseline to allow monitoring of the maintenance of current levels of service provision over time and, following action taken to address areas of concern, whether future provision has been improved.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2023

Judith Amudjie, Kofi Agyekum, Emmanuel Adinyira, Samuel Amos-Abanyie and Edward Ayebeng Botchway

This study aims to examine the strategies that can be adopted to enhance the practice of circular economy (CE) principles among built environment (BE) firms operating in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the strategies that can be adopted to enhance the practice of circular economy (CE) principles among built environment (BE) firms operating in the Ghanaian Construction Industry (GCI).

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was used to solicit the views of 162 BE professionals working in construction, consulting, and developer firms on the issue under investigation. The questionnaire was developed through a review of related literature and complemented with a pilot review. Data were analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

The findings revealed four major categories of strategies (i.e. systems and technical related strategies, market orientation and operational strategies, knowledge dissemination and awareness-related strategies, and environmental and regulatory strategies) to promote the practice of the principles of CE among BE professionals in the GCI.

Originality/value

This study’s findings provide insights into an under-investigated topic in the construction industry, especially, in a developing country such as Ghana, and offer new and additional information and insights into the current state-of-the-art on CE implementation.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

A.Allan Schmid

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was Asher…

Abstract

The first Wisconsin Ph.D.s who came to MSU with an institutional bent were agricultural economists and included Henry Larzalere (Ph.D. 1938) whose major professor was Asher Hobson. Larzalere recalls the influence of Commons who retired in 1933. Upon graduation, Larzalere worked a short time for Wisconsin Governor Phillip Fox LaFollette who won passage of the nation’s first unemployment compensation act. Commons had earlier helped LaFollette’s father, Robert, to a number of institutional innovations.4 Larzalere continued the Commons’ tradition of contributing to the development of new institutions rather than being content to provide an efficiency apologia for existing private governance structures. He helped Michigan farmers form cooperatives. He taught land economics prior to Barlowe’s arrival in 1948, but primarily taught agricultural marketing. One of his Master’s degree students was Glenn Johnson (see below). Larzalere retired in 1977.

Details

Wisconsin "Government and Business" and the History of Heterodox Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-090-6

1 – 10 of 165