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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Elien Neimeijer, Judith Kuipers, Nienke Peters-Scheffer, Peer Van der Helm and Robert Didden

The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth account of how individuelas with a mild intellectual disabilitiy or borderline intellectual functioning (MID-BIF; IQ…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth account of how individuelas with a mild intellectual disabilitiy or borderline intellectual functioning (MID-BIF; IQ 50–85) perceive their group climate in a secure forensic setting. Giving voice to these service users may provide relevant insights for secure forensic settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to explore what individuals with MID-BIF experience with regard to their group climate.

Findings

In the interviews about the four domains of group climate (i.e. repression, support, growth and atmosphere), five overarching dimensions appeared, namely, autonomy, uniformity, recognition, competence and dignity. Depending on the person and the (treatment) context in which he/she resides, these five dimensions relate to all four factors of the group climate instrument.

Originality/value

From the perspective of individuals with MID-BIF, this study contributes by providing a framework to “fine-tune” group climate on five dimensions. Training socio-therapists to be sensitive to interpret ambiguous signals on these dimensions can contribute to optimizing group climate in secure forensic settings.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Joseph Loersch and William Ross

The purpose of this paper is to describe a classroom negotiation exercise. A case involving controversy over the naming of a sports stadium containing a university…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a classroom negotiation exercise. A case involving controversy over the naming of a sports stadium containing a university football field and track is described. A local municipality, representing veterans groups, negotiates with university officials over a university plan to rename “Veteran's Memorial Stadium” after a recently‐retired football coach.

Design/methodology/approach

The negotiation activity is adapted from an actual case. It requires little advance preparation and can be used with either pairs or small groups of participants. “Teaching notes” provide instructions for using the activity.

Findings

The “Teaching Notes” examine how this controversy illustrates several concepts related to conflict, integrative bargaining, power and negotiating on behalf of constituents.

Originality/value

The case differs from many published cases in that one side's position is apparently rooted in values and matters of principle whereas the other side's position is interest‐based. The student must grapple with these dynamics, while seeking an integrative solution to the issues.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Nora Gannon-Slater, Priya G. La Londe, Hope L. Crenshaw, Margaret E. Evans, Jennifer C. Greene and Thomas A. Schwandt

Data use cultures in schools determine data use practices. Such cultures can be muted by powerful macro accountability and organizational learning cultures. Further…

Abstract

Purpose

Data use cultures in schools determine data use practices. Such cultures can be muted by powerful macro accountability and organizational learning cultures. Further, strong equity-oriented data use cultures are challenging to establish. The purpose of this paper is to engage these cultural tensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The data discourse and decisions of four grade-level teams in two elementary schools in one district were studied through observation of 62 grade-level meetings over the course of a year. The observations focused on “data talk,” defined as the structure and content of team conversations about interim student performance data.

Findings

Distinct macro cultures of accountability and organizational learning existed in the two schools. The teams’ own data use cultures partly explained the absence of a focus on equity, and none of the teams used student performance data to make instructional decisions in support of the district’s equity aims. Leadership missed opportunities to cultivate an equity-focused data use culture.

Practical implications

School leaders who advocate that equity importantly guides data use routines, and can anticipate how cultures of accountability or organizational learning “show up” in data use conversations, will be better prepared to redirect teachers’ interpretations of data and clarify expectations of equity reform initiatives.

Originality/value

This study is novel in its concept of “data talk,” which provided a holistic but nuanced account of data use practices in grade-level meetings.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Federica Fava

The paper aims to assess the impact and responses to coronavirus disease 2019 in six European heritage labs (Horizon 2020 Framework Programme) selected for their adaptive…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to assess the impact and responses to coronavirus disease 2019 in six European heritage labs (Horizon 2020 Framework Programme) selected for their adaptive heritage re-use practices based on participation, self-organisation and self-management. As they are naturally oriented towards building resilient urban systems, the hypothesis is that the co-production of cultural values and places promoted by these projects could create the conditions for equitable perspectives of resilience in the normality of contemporary urban life.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on data collected through a survey of six European Living Labs between January and May 2021. The survey results are framed by a literature review that defines adaptive reuse in terms of resilience. The five resilience characteristics described by Judith Rodin (awareness, diversification, integration, self-regulation and adaptability) are used to navigate the literature and organise the survey results.

Findings

Combining survey results and insights from the literature, some modes and elements (territorial, social, financial) are presented that contribute to creating the conditions for resilience through adaptive heritage reuse according to community-based approaches. Without claiming to be exhaustive, this evidence should be considered in the design phase of resilience programmes, policies or projects related to cultural heritage.

Originality/value

The concepts of community and resilience are becoming increasingly important in the field of cultural heritage. This paper makes a creative contribution to the ongoing debate by presenting and evaluating the contribution of adaptive reuse practices to resilience building.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Jane Holschuh and Steven P. Segal

While social network support has been found to be critical for persons with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders, these persons are at risk for having smaller…

Abstract

While social network support has been found to be critical for persons with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders, these persons are at risk for having smaller, less functional networks than non-clinical populations. Multi-purpose or multiplex network ties are especially beneficial because they are known to be associated with positive outcomes. This study examined which types of factors were related to network multiplexity over a ten-year period in a sample of 234 persons with severe mental illness, three-fourths of whom had schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. We asked whether clinical characteristics, the nature of the sheltered-care social environments in which subjects were living at baseline, and the number of residential care episodes predicted network multiplexity at follow-up. Using three different conceptualizations of network multiplexity as outcomes, we found that, in general, a prior history of long-term institutionalization, social environments rated higher on practical orientation, and fewer residential care episodes over the study period predicted networks deficient in tie multiplexity. Contrary to expectations, psychopathology was related to only one of the multiplexity outcomes.

Details

Social Networks and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-152-1

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Margaret S. Crocco, Judith Cramer and Ellen B. Meier

Focusing on gender as an aspect of diversity, the purpose of this paper is to review social studies research on technology, and suggest a new direction, with gender…

3845

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on gender as an aspect of diversity, the purpose of this paper is to review social studies research on technology, and suggest a new direction, with gender redefined from a gap to be eliminated to a difference to be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a literature review of research on gender, technology, and social studies from 1987 to 2007.

Findings

Previously, men had more access and used more types of technology than women, but a shift to web‐based computing eliminates some gender gaps. Women dominate online communication. Although “male” technology culture interferes with girls' self‐efficacy in schools and potential computer careers, the new Web 2.0 “participatory culture” holds promise because it relies on collaboration and networking, two well documented female strengths.

Research limitations/implications

The gap notion of gender is questionable because: technology culture has been constructed as male; and social studies education, where women greatly out number men, pays little attention to gender. Evidence suggests that girls and women use technology well when it serves their interests, which may not be the same as men's. Defining gender as difference helps researchers answer calls to integrate “21st century literacies” into future studies and put gender equity at the center of future technology policy.

Originality/value

Very little has been written about gender as a facet of multicultural social studies education in its relation to social studies.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

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