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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Judith Davidson and Cynthia Jacobs

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data…

Abstract

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data analysis software in higher education research courses. This change has significant implications for their practice as researchers and teachers. In this article we provide experienced‐based recommendations for individual practice (research instructors, dissertation advisers, and doctoral students) and for institutional practice (scaling up for deep integration of qualitative data analysis software). Our recommendations are grounded in hard‐earned experience gleaned from many years of working with individuals and institutional contexts to improve the use of qualitative research in higher education.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2007

Sarah Kuhn and Judith Davidson

In this article, two experienced QR instructors argue that reflective attention to the tools and materials used by researchers and instructors can help to enhance student…

Abstract

In this article, two experienced QR instructors argue that reflective attention to the tools and materials used by researchers and instructors can help to enhance student learning. Identifying three sorts of things in QR those on which research is conducted (texts, images, etc.); the technologies used by the researcher, from software to notebooks; and the objects of the culture under study the authors discuss three examples of their use of things in the context of QR. A detailed case discussion based on the authors’ experience with flip chart paper, NVivo software and Tinkertoy concept maps reveals some of the benefits of attention to things. Based on their analysis, the authors conclude that there are four ways in which a focus on things can support learning and teaching: by scaffolding student understanding, by providing transparency in the learning and research process, by representing and supporting multiple views and perspectives, and by promoting reflexivity and reflection.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Hannah Bonner

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the recent surge of social media (mis)use in horror films including The Cabin in the Woods (2012), Unfriended (2015) and #Horror (2015) and how young women’s relationship to social media in these films often pillories females for existing under, and delighting in, an anonymous, ubiquitous gaze. In these narratives, women are slut shamed both in the plot and through the threat of social media’s panoply of screens, sur- and selfveillance. In my discussion, I will utilize feminist film theory including the writings of Laura Mulvey, Linda Williams and Barbara Creed, while also including contemporary cultural criticism from writers and journalists like Nancy Jo Sales and Leora Tanenbaum to explore the horror genre from a more contemporary, multi-discourse perspective. The technology in these films serve as harbingers, intimating the figurative and literal dangers to come for their female protagonists, ultimately suggesting that the horror in these films is the medium itself and the patriarchal social media culture that these devices cultivate.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Beverley Hill, Judith Secker and Fay Davidson

This research investigates the impact of nonlinear career trajectories on female staff in the academy. It argues that assessment of “achievement relative to opportunity”…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the impact of nonlinear career trajectories on female staff in the academy. It argues that assessment of “achievement relative to opportunity” is essential to the equitable positioning of women in the academy.

Methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on extended structured interviews with 43 staff.

Findings

Men and women can experience career interruptions, deviations, and hijacks, but, in general, women experience more interruption, and the cumulative effect on their careers is greater.

Practical implications

The authors point to ways in which the assessment of achievement relative to opportunity can be implemented in universities to improve retention and career outcomes for female academic and professional staff.

Social implications

Embedding the principles of achievement relative to opportunity in evaluative decision making, supports people (particularly women) who have spent time away from the workforce in becoming more competitive in assessments of suitability for leadership and advancement. Changing traditional methods of evaluating merit has the potential to allow people from diverse backgrounds to be fairly evaluated, and shift the dominance of people who have experienced little or no career interruption.

Originality/value

The originality is the measurement of impact of nonlinear careers within the academy. The contribution is in the applicability of the findings and practical suggestions for implementation.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

John R. Austin

Recent research on group demography demonstrates that an increase in demographic diversity has both positive and negative effects on group effectiveness. These studies…

Abstract

Recent research on group demography demonstrates that an increase in demographic diversity has both positive and negative effects on group effectiveness. These studies have linked increased group diversity with an increase in creative thinking and innovation, a decrease in intra‐group cohesion, and an increase in intragroup conflict. The cognitive processing framework proposed in this paper integrates these results into a coherent understanding of the effects of diversity on groups. The cognitive framework provides an explanation of group diversity effects and it suggests ways to minimize the negative effects of group diversity.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Myra Piat, Kimberly Seida and Judith Sabetti

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

The go-along technique, which blends participant observation and interviewing, was used to gather data from 19 individuals with SMI living in supported housing. Data were analyzed through the CHIME framework of personal recovery, which includes social connectedness, hope and optimism, identity, meaning in life, and empowerment.

Findings

Applying the CHIME framework to qualitative data reveals the multiple ways in which everyday experiences, within and beyond formal mental healthcare environments, shapes personal recovery processes.

Research limitations/implications

Combining novel methods and conceptual frameworks to lived experiences sharpens extant knowledge of the active and non-linear aspects to personal recovery. The role of the researcher must be critically considered when using go-along methods.

Practical implications

Practitioners working with this population should account for the role of socially supportive and financially accessible spaces and activities that support the daily work of recovery beyond the context of formal care and services.

Originality/value

This study utilizes an innovative method to illustrate the crucial role of daily and seemingly banal experiences in fostering or hindering personal recovery processes. It is also the one of the first studies to comprehensively apply the CHIME framework to qualitative data in order to understand the recovery journeys of individuals with SMI living in supported housing.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Raymond A. Friedman and Martin N. Davidson

This paper proposes that those who study diversity conflict recognize the distinction between first‐order diversity conflict and second‐order diversity conflict. The…

Abstract

This paper proposes that those who study diversity conflict recognize the distinction between first‐order diversity conflict and second‐order diversity conflict. The former refers to discrimination, while the latter refers to disputes over remedies designed to eliminate discrimination. First‐order disputes affect subordinant group members most strongly in the organization, are morally unambiguous for most, and are organized around set organizational and societal procedures. Second‐order disputes involve dominant as well as subordinant group members (so that more people are affected), are more morally ambiguous, and lack set procedures for dealing with them. As a result, second‐order disputes tend to remain hidden, despite being wide‐spread, resulting in autistic hostility. The presence of second‐order conflict may undermine efforts to resolve first‐order disputes, and lead to escalation of conflict between people from different identity groups. Recognizing this distinction is critical for understanding the dynamics of diversity conflicts.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Judith Anne McKenzie, Toni Abrahams, Colleen Adnams and Sharon Kleintjes

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the history, current status and possible future directions for intellectual disability (ID) policy and practice in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the history, current status and possible future directions for intellectual disability (ID) policy and practice in South Africa (SA).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed by academics and practitioners in the field of ID in SA. A review of the literature, accompanied by a joint writing and discussion process was carried out to identify critical issues in the development of ID services, specifically facing the challenge of moving from racially based provision towards equitable services for all citizens with ID.

Findings

Progressive policy has replaced practices of scientific racism which were previously used to support the establishment of white supremacism. This positive move is still in process and has not resulted in the immediate establishment of human rights. A vibrant civil society is engaging with this task currently.

Research limitations/implications

The findings point to the need for a human rights approach that takes into account the postcolonial context of SA.

Practical implications

There is a need for continued advocacy that is inclusive of people with ID and their families.

Social implications

Continuing engagement between government and civil society is recommended to ensure the achievement of human rights for citizens with ID.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to ID researchers and practitioners from the global South as it describes a non-western context that might have resonance with other low and middle income countries.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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