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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Augustine Senanu Kukah and Judith Amudjie

With its impact already felt, the construction industry worldwide is gradually reviving following the lifting up of lockdowns amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Though some…

Abstract

Purpose

With its impact already felt, the construction industry worldwide is gradually reviving following the lifting up of lockdowns amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Though some articles have been written regarding its impact on the construction industry in other countries, much is yet to be known concerning the current impact in Ghana. This study aims to examine the impact of COVID-19 on Ghana’s construction industry and assess how construction companies are contributing to the fight against COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with nine key professionals working with D1K1 firms currently working on projects of almost similar sizes within the confines of a reputable tertiary institution in Ghana were conducted over a span of three weeks. Thematic analysis was conducted with Nvivo 12 Pro Application software.

Findings

From the findings, the major impact includes: a decrease in work rate, delays in payments and an increase in the cost of materials arising from border closure. On the measures by construction companies in contributing to the fight against the pandemic, findings indicated: educating the workforce on the virus, the provision of PPEs, regular and effective checks on entry and exit from the site.

Practical implications

The study is significant, as knowledge of the impact posed by the pandemic will provide some idea of the measures to put in place to ensure the gradual to full recovery of the industry.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the fact that it is a pioneering study on the impact of COVID-19 on the Ghanaian construction industry.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Emmanuel Adinyira and Judith Amudjie

The purpose of this paper is to examine the views of construction practitioners on the prevalence of ethical misconduct within the invitation to tender and tender…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the views of construction practitioners on the prevalence of ethical misconduct within the invitation to tender and tender evaluation and award stages of construction contracts in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a critical comparative review of literature resulting in the identification of 18 potential misconducts within the invitation to tender and 11 potential misconducts within the tender evaluation and award stages of construction contracts, a questionnaire survey was conducted among 65 construction professionals. Data obtained from the survey were analysed using both descriptive (i.e. frequencies, mean scores and standard deviations) and inferential statistics (paired t-test), followed by gap analysis.

Findings

The findings revealed that corrupt, fraudulent, collusive or coercive practices, client divulging more information to the preferred bidder and inflating tender prices by tenderers in return for kickbacks are key unethical practices prevalent at the invitation to tender stage. Following these key unethical practices, the findings further suggested through gap analysis that submission of bids on non-working days and inadequate time for preparation and submission of tenders were the top two unethical practices that needed serious interventions at this stage. At the tender evaluation and award stage, the findings revealed that interference by influential people in political positions, fake tendering and bid shopping are prevalent. Again, from the gap analysis, interference by influential people in political positions and poor definition of selection criteria were identified to be the two key unethical practices that need urgent intervention at this stage of construction contracts.

Practical implications

This study holds a significant practical implication in the sense that key unethical practices at the invitation to tender and tender evaluation and award stages of construction contracts have been identified, and this provides a suitable basis for stakeholders that spearhead such activities to offer suitable interventions to control such practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge as it uncovers ethical misconducts within two important phases of construction contracts in a developing country setting. As there is a continuous effort by the international community towards finding lasting solutions to such misconducts, the findings from this study can be used as a starting point for appropriate policies to be put in place in Ghana to control such misconducts.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Kofi Agyekum, Frank Ato Ghansah, Portia Atswei Tetteh and Judith Amudjie

This study aims to examine the role of project managers (PMs) in construction health and safety in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the role of project managers (PMs) in construction health and safety in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Purposive sampling technique was used to select licenced PMs in Ghana where data was collected with the use of structured questionnaires. Mean score analysis, Kendall’s Coefficient of Concordance, Relative Importance Index and Cronbach’s alpha were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study discovered that most PMs on construction firms in Ghana allocate between 1% and 5% of the total project cost to health and safety. According to the study, client satisfaction is the most important parameter to consider in construction project management. Structural frame, method of fixing and edge of materials were the key design activities that caused PMs to make frequent reference to health and safety. It was revealed that PMs refer to health and safety when confronted by all the procurement-related situations.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the built environment professionals in Ghana. The findings cannot be generalized and extended to other developing countries; however, it could serve as a lesson to them.

Practical implications

The findings of the study are anticipated to provide information about the critical role of PMs in promoting health and safety throughout the project life cycle.

Originality/value

The novelty of the study sought to delve into the complex nature of construction to identify the role of PMs in relation to the health and safety practices in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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