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Article

Eva Martínez-Caro, Gabriel Cepeda-Carrión, Juan G. Cegarra-Navarro and Alexeis Garcia-Perez

The spread of the Internet in the business world has led to the development of new business-to-business (B2B) settings. Although a large number of companies have adopted…

Abstract

Purpose

The spread of the Internet in the business world has led to the development of new business-to-business (B2B) settings. Although a large number of companies have adopted B2B strategies, many of these fail to implement such strategies effectively. The most common barriers encompass the technology assimilation by users. This study investigates how IT assimilation can encourage potential and realised absorptive capacity and how these can, in turn, facilitate organisational agility and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in Spanish companies that make use of Editran, a platform to support B2B strategies. In total, 110 valid responses were obtained. Advanced analytical methods of PLS-SEM as fit measures and prediction procedure recently developed by Shmueli et al. (2019) were used.

Findings

The results show that there is a positive relationship between the three preceding constructs (IT assimilation, potential and realised absorptive capacity) and organisational agility. This study also finds support for a direct relationship between organisational agility and firm performance.

Originality/value

This study provides a further understanding and forecasting through the theoretical development and empirical investigation of the role of IT assimilation on firm performance in a B2B scenario by: (1) examining the link between IT and the firm's absorptive capacity and, more specifically, with the two subsets of potential and realised absorptive capacity, which have not received much attention from previous literature; and (2) exploring how an improvement in potential and realised absorptive capacity may place firms in a better position to develop their organisational agility.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Ramón Sabater‐Sánchez

Feedback learning transforms social knowledge into individual knowledge. In this process, tension arises because the current knowledge impedes the assimilation of new…

Abstract

Purpose

Feedback learning transforms social knowledge into individual knowledge. In this process, tension arises because the current knowledge impedes the assimilation of new learning. Therefore, the feedback requires what Schumpeter refers to as “creative destruction”: discarding, or at least setting aside, the institutional order to enact variations that allow intuitive insights and actions to surface and be pursued. This paper examines the relative importance and significance of “technological systems” on feedback and the effects on the creation of relational capital.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the literature is reviewed to identify relevant measures and present a structural equation model, which is validated through an empirical investigation of 151 SMEs in the Spanish technological and information systems sector.

Findings

The results indicate that “the creative destruction” depends on the technology system of the company. Furthermore, if the creative destruction is a prior step in the feedback process, then the feedback process is influenced more by the creative destruction.

Practical implications

The results indicate that despite the majority of companies having connections to the internet, managers do not know the potential business benefits of technology systems for their clients, individuals and teams, and ignore the problem of human integration.

Originality/value

The findings are significant, since they introduce the traditional focus of a technology system at the feedback learning process.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Eusebio Angel Martínez‐Conesa

E‐business requires small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to seek both external and internal knowledge and to establish external and internal relationships with…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐business requires small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to seek both external and internal knowledge and to establish external and internal relationships with partners, such as customers and suppliers. This paper aims to describe a model that examines how knowledge management has an impact on the adoption of e‐business, particularly in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews literature to identify relevant measures through a structural equation model, which is validated through an empirical investigation of 107 SMEs in the Spanish telecommunications sector.

Findings

The results show that, in order to implement e‐business systems, companies need to provide and support the acquisition, sharing and application of knowledge as prior steps.

Research limitations/implications

Other factors that have not been included in this study are also likely to affect knowledge acquisition.

Practical implications

Organisations that engage in learning from their customers and suppliers not only test the effectiveness of a new direction of e‐business, but also have the potential to design their e‐business around what customers truly need and want, and as such gain a sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

These results have implications for e‐business managers in formulating policies and targeting appropriate organisational capabilities to ensure the effective adoption of e‐business systems.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 28 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Frank W. Dewhurst

The environment provided by an organisation to facilitate learning and create knowledge has been defined as the shared organisational context. The value to an organisation…

Abstract

Purpose

The environment provided by an organisation to facilitate learning and create knowledge has been defined as the shared organisational context. The value to an organisation of knowledge created by the shared organisational context is called intellectual capital, of which one key component is relational capital. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the aspect of learning concerned with challenging the basic beliefs or processes that companies take for granted, which is embodied in the concept of unlearning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature to identify relevant measures and present a structural equation model, which is validated through an empirical investigation of 139 small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Spanish optometry sector.

Findings

The results indicate that companies need to support unlearning as a prior step, otherwise unlearning does not have any significant effect on the creation of relational capital.

Research limitations/implications

Few, if any, studies of the shared organisational context have considered the relationship between unlearning and the creation of intellectual capital.

Practical implications

Previous studies, particularly in knowledge management, have focussed on knowledge management systems in large world‐class organisations rather than the underlying learning process in SMEs.

Originality/value

This study examines three key constituents of the shared organisational context (the individual context, management and teamwork) and their effects on the process of unlearning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Ricardo Hernández‐Mogollon, Gabriel Cepeda‐Carrión, Juan G. Cegarra‐Navarro and Antonio Leal‐Millán

There is no empirical evidence, particularly in relation to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), to support the concept of cultural barriers and how they relate to…

Abstract

Purpose

There is no empirical evidence, particularly in relation to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), to support the concept of cultural barriers and how they relate to open‐mindedness (OM). Some of these cultural barriers can be linked to outdated knowledge, which can impede the adoption of new configurations. The purpose of this paper therefore is to test the role of cultural barriers in the relationship between OM and organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

These relationships are examined through an empirical investigation of 133 SMEs.

Findings

The results show that the relationship between OM and organizational innovation is likely to suffer if a firm does not overcome previously its cultural barriers. An explanation for this could be thatoutdated knowledge can impede the adoption of new configurations. Therefore, it is important for organizations to provide an appropriate environment for overcoming cultural barriers. Otherwise new knowledge will not be acted on or incorporated into new products and services.

Originality/value

The authors point out the importance for organizations of taking this perspective into account when they are seeking to respond proactively to the challenges thrown up by the external environment.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Frank W. Dewhurst and Juan G. Cegarra Navarro

External communities of practice are groups formed by company clients and employees based on common interests, commitment, mutual trust and collaboration whose members…

Abstract

External communities of practice are groups formed by company clients and employees based on common interests, commitment, mutual trust and collaboration whose members regularly share knowledge and learning. This paper examines how external communities of practice contribute to the creation of relational capital through an empirical investigation of 139 small to medium‐sized enterprises in the Spanish optometry sector using structural equation modelling validated by factor analysis.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 11 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Domingo Ribeiro‐Soriano and David Urbano

The purpose of this paper is to add new theoretical insights on the employee‐organization relationship (EOR) in the context of corporate entrepreneurship (CE)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add new theoretical insights on the employee‐organization relationship (EOR) in the context of corporate entrepreneurship (CE), specifically in collective entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a brief overview of the content of each of the articles included in this special issue.

Findings

In the last decades, the study of the EOR has become an integral part of the literature as an approach aimed to provide the theoretical foundations to understanding the employee and employer perspectives to the exchange. Also, the greater complex environment and the higher level of innovativeness have pushed firms to become more entrepreneurial in order to identify new opportunities for sustained superior performance. In this context, emerges CE and involves not only formal activities to enhance product innovation, risk taking and a proactive response to environmental forces, but also organizational learning, driven by collaboration, and commitment. Specifically, different EORs and specific human resources management practices are required in the light of collective entrepreneurship, understood as work among entrepreneurial teams within the organizations and collaboration among employees.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the EOR in collective entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

María Teresa Sánchez-Polo, Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro, Valentina Cillo and Anthony Wensley

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of continuous learning and the mitigation or elimination of knowledge barriers affecting information technology (IT…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of continuous learning and the mitigation or elimination of knowledge barriers affecting information technology (IT) assimilation in the health-care sector. Most of the problems with IT assimilations stem from a poor understanding of the nature of suitable information, the lack of trust, cultural differences, the lack of appropriate training and hierarchical bureaucratic structures and procedures. To overcome these barriers, this study provides evidence that a continuous learning process can play a part in overcoming some of the obstacles to the assimilation of IT.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates how a continuous learning environment can counteract the presence of knowledge barriers, and, along with such an environment, can, in turn, facilitate IT assimilation. The study uses ADANCO 2.0.1 Professional for Windows and involves the collection and analysis of data provided by 210 health-care end users.

Findings

The study provides evidence in support of the proposition that continuous learning may facilitate the assimilation of IT by health-care end users through the mitigation of knowledge barriers (e.g. lack of trust or resistance to change). The mitigation of these barriers requires the gathering and utilization of new knowledge and knowledge structures. The results support the hypothesis that one way in which this can be achieved is through continuous learning (i.e. through assessing the situation, consulting experts, seeking feedback and tracking progress).

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is the relatively simple statistical method that has been used for the analysis. However, the results provided here will serve as a preliminary basis for more sophisticated analysis which is currently underway.

Practical implications

The study provides useful insights into ways of using continuous learning to facilitate IT assimilation by end users in the health-care domain. This can be of use to hospitals seeking to implement end user IT technologies and, in particular, telemedicine technologies. It can also be used to develop awareness of knowledge barriers and possible approaches to mitigate the effects of such barriers. Such an awareness can assist hospital staff in finding creative solutions for using technology tools. This potentially augments the ability of hospital staff to work with patients and carers, encouraging them to take initiative (make choices and solve problems relevant to them). This, in turn, allows hospitals to avoid negative and thus de-motivating experiences involving themselves and their end users (patients) and improving IT assimilation. This is liable to lead to improved morale and improved assimilation of IT by end users (patients).

Social implications

As ICT systems and services should entail participation of a wide range of users, developers and stakeholders, including medical doctors, nurses, social workers, patients and programmers and interaction designers, the study provides useful social implication for health management and people well-being.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a better understanding of the nature and impacts of continuous learning. Although previous studies in the field of knowledge management have shown that knowledge management procedures and routines can provide support to IT assimilation, few studies, if any, have explored the relationship between continuous learning and IT assimilation with particular emphasis on knowledge barriers in the health-care domain.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro, Anthony Wensley, Daniel Jimenez-Jimenez and Antonio Sotos-Villarejo

This paper argues that the combination of factors that facilitate focal and peripheral vision represent two distinct types of knowledge corridors. While focal vision may…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper argues that the combination of factors that facilitate focal and peripheral vision represent two distinct types of knowledge corridors. While focal vision may help detect signals that relate to the current objectives of the firm, peripheral vision is directed to non-central issues that may provide signals that relate to emerging trends in the external environment. Ambidexterity vision refers to the tension between these two different business visions within the same organization. This paper aims to examine the significance of procedural memory to an organization’s ambidexterity vision, along with investigating the impact procedural memory has on organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducted in this study addresses the following two questions: Does the enhancement of procedural memory result in the development of superior ambidexterity vision? Does the simultaneous development of both focal and peripheral vision enhance organizational learning? These research questions are studied by conducting an empirical investigation involving data provided by 203 banking employees. These data are analysed using a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

Analysis of the data provides support for the existence of a relationship between ambidexterity vision and organizational learning.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the re-direction of managers’ perceptions to supporting and enhancing an ambidexterity vision is likely to result in an improvement in their ability to identify emerging trends, new and emerging customers and potential shifts in customer needs and tastes.

Originality/value

This work suggests that the re-direction of managers’ perceptions to supporting and enhancing an ambidexterity vision is likely to result in an improvement in their ability to identify emerging trends, new and emerging customers and potential shifts in customer needs and tastes.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Silvia Martelo-Landroguez

Intellectual capital includes what employees know and the agility to search and retrieve knowledge (organizational agility). Organizational agility could be seen as the…

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual capital includes what employees know and the agility to search and retrieve knowledge (organizational agility). Organizational agility could be seen as the result of using validated routines and protocols (knowledge application), but also as the result of using unproven theories, rumors, colloquial expressions, or sayings (counter-knowledge), which means that organizational memory may enable both the application of good knowledge and the mitigation of counter-knowledge. This study examines the links between a firm's organizational memory, counter-knowledge, knowledge application, and organizational agility.

Design/methodology/approach

Using SmartPLS 3.2.8 in a sample of 112 companies, the following questions were addressed: Does the improvement of organizational memory result in the growth of organizational agility? Does the growth of counter-knowledge and knowledge application at the same time hinder the enhancement of organizational agility?

Findings

The results support that organizational memory not only enhances the application of gained knowledge but also allows the spreading of rumors, gossip, and inappropriate or false beliefs (counter-knowledge). Furthermore, results support that the knowledge that emerges from the development in parallel or simultaneous of counter-knowledge and knowledge application provides bad references, which will lead to a degradation of organizational agility.

Practical implications

When supporting organizational agility, managers should be conscious of the urgency of counteracting the misuse of counter-knowledge.

Originality/value

These findings make an important contribution to what is potentially a barrier to innovation and creativity, helping managers overcome the problems associated with misunderstandings or wrong assumptions derived from counter-knowledge.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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