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Article

Cristina Fernandes, João Ferreira, Mário Raposo, Ricardo Hernández and Juan Carlos Diaz-Casero

With this work, the authors seek to advance knowledge in this field mentioned above. The purpose of this paper is to stress the role of two groups of components related to…

Abstract

Purpose

With this work, the authors seek to advance knowledge in this field mentioned above. The purpose of this paper is to stress the role of two groups of components related to individuals’ knowledge: the intrinsic base of existing knowledge and exposure to external knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study examined the impact of knowledge in the business creation process. Data came from aggregated panel data at the country level taken from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor over a five-year period (2009-2013).

Findings

Results show that knowledge affects the business creation process. The research identifies the following factors as influential: detection of capabilities, entrepreneurial experience, and experience investing in other firms.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research relate to the data aggregation at the country level. Future research should examine disaggregated GEM data for the three economic stages at the classification level.

Practical implications

The perception of self-efficacy appears to be critical in understanding the planning of intentional behavior because of its influence on the formation of intentions through situational perceptions of viability.

Originality/value

Generally, the literature that emphasizes the role of knowledge and entrepreneurship in small firms is theoretically limited and focuses solely on the role of knowledge in the decision to start a business.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

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Article

Juan Carlos Díaz‐Casero, D. Ángel Manuel Díaz‐Aunión, Mari Cruz Sánchez‐Escobedo, Alicia Coduras and Ricardo Hernández‐Mogollón

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically whether economic freedom affects entrepreneurial activity in three groups of countries, classified according to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically whether economic freedom affects entrepreneurial activity in three groups of countries, classified according to economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the index of entrepreneurial activity cover the period between 2002 and 2009, and are taken from the annual GEM (Global Entrepreneurship Monitor) reports and from the Index of Economic Freedom published by The Heritage Foundation from 1995 to 2009. The same analysis is carried out, grouping the countries by development level, following the classification included in the Global Competitiveness Report 2009‐2010. A Ridge regression analysis is performed to measure the model's goodness‐of‐fit and to determine equations that can be used for future predictions.

Findings

The results obtained in the correlation analysis show that economic freedom is closely related to entrepreneurial activity. The results suggest that TEA rates, opportunity‐TEA rates and necessity‐TEA rates decrease when there is an increase in economic freedom in a country, as just two of the areas analyzed – i.e. “government size” and “fiscal freedom” – appear to foster the emergence of new entrepreneurs. When countries are grouped by level of economic development, the results for countries belonging to the “Innovation‐Driven Economies” group show that the opportunity‐TEA rates increase as the economic freedom index grows.

Originality/value

The study indicates that entrepreneurship by opportunity increases in the group of Innovation‐Driven Economies with smaller “government size” and more “fiscal freedom”.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Juan Carlos Díaz Casero, Manuel Almodóvar González, María de la Cruz Sánchez Escobedo, Alicia Coduras Martínez and Ricardo Hernández Mogollón

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of institutions on entrepreneurship in groups of countries classified according to their economic development.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of institutions on entrepreneurship in groups of countries classified according to their economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Data used come from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, the Economic Freedom in the World Index; and from the Global Competitiveness Report.

Findings

The results provide useful information for the public and private sectors as evidence that some institutional variables that influence business creation depend on the development stage and report critical aspects to progress in each type of country in order to foster entrepreneurship. In developing nations the “size of the business sector” and “health and primary education” are critical variables, while for transition economies they stack the “integrity of the legal system” and “fulfilling contracts” and for developed economies the “size of the government” and “credit available to the private sector”.

Originality/value

This study constitutes an unusual approach because the literature on the impact of institutions on entrepreneurship is very scarce.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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