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Case study
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Heatherjean MacNeil, Amanda Wiehe Lopes, Banu Ozkazanc-Pan and Anne Douglass

The information presented in this case was gathered through interviews and observations carried out during the time Ms Joy attended the Initiative for A Competitive Inner…

Abstract

Research methodology

The information presented in this case was gathered through interviews and observations carried out during the time Ms Joy attended the Initiative for A Competitive Inner City business support program in 2017. In addition, focus groups that took place after the program provided important information and insights into her decision-making process and business goals. Additional interviews were conducted in 2018 and 2019 after the business program ended to gain in-depth knowledge of Ms Joy’s entrepreneurial journey.

Case overview/synopsis

This case details the experiences of Winsome Joy in recognizing market opportunities in the child care industry and then expanding into the educational materials industry. The case focuses on challenges related to founding and sustaining her business and the ways in which Ms Joy engaged in “opportunity recognition” and “effectuation” to become a successful entrepreneur. The case points out the challenges of the child care and early education field in terms of professional training, hiring practices and retaining qualified staff. It provides an aspirational role model who has overcome these challenges by finding and recognizing new market opportunities.

Complexity academic level

This case is relevant for undergraduate and graduate courses in entrepreneurship.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Donald C. Barnes, Joel E. Collier, Vince Howe and K. Douglas Hoffman

Historically, firms have dedicated an abundance of resources in the pursuit of customer satisfaction and its corresponding favorable consequences. However, research…

Abstract

Purpose

Historically, firms have dedicated an abundance of resources in the pursuit of customer satisfaction and its corresponding favorable consequences. However, research indicates that customer satisfaction may not necessarily result in the outcomes pursued. This paper aims to focus on the concept of customer delight and explore antecedents and consequences of interest to the service firm. More specifically, the proposed model explores the linkages of employee effort, employee expertise and the firm’s tangibles to customer surprise and joy which in turn lead to customer delight and per cent of budget spent.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a grocery store. The hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results from this study yield new insights into the dual pathways leading to customer delight through joy and surprise. That is, joy and tangibles lead to both joy and surprise, whereas expertise leads to joy alone. Both joy and surprise are completely mediated through delight to per cent of budget spent. Interestingly, higher frequency customers experience a stronger relationship from joy to delight.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have implications for the ongoing debate on the viability of customer delight and extending the theoretical understanding of why customer delight represents such a powerful force in the service environment.

Practical implications

By providing specific variables that impact both joy and surprise, management can develop tactics to develop delight initiatives.

Originality/value

This is the first study proposing multiple paths to customer delight. Further, this is the first study to link needs based and disconfirmation into a single model.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Terje Slåtten, Mehmet Mehmetoglu, Göran Svensson and Sander Sværi

This study aims to focus on what types of atmospheric experiences emotionally touch visitors at a winter park. The objective is to describe and explain the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on what types of atmospheric experiences emotionally touch visitors at a winter park. The objective is to describe and explain the relationship between: three atmospheric constructs (ambience, interaction, and design); the construct of joy; and the construct of customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The research data are based on a study of customers visiting a Norwegian winter park, in which 162 visitors participated in the survey. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test the measurements and structural properties between atmospheric experiences, joy, and loyalty to winter parks.

Findings

The findings reveal that two out of the three constructs of atmospheric experiences are linked to customers' feelings of joy, namely, design and interaction. The atmospheric construct of design had the strongest impact on customers' emotions. Furthermore, the study finds that customers' feelings of joy are highly related to the construct of customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The study limits its focus to one type of hedonic service, namely customers visiting a winter park. Although the results from the study offer implications for other winter parks, there is a need for further research in other hedonic services to verify their validity, reliability, and generality.

Practical implications

The study emphasizes how important it is that managers of hedonic services consider the significance of the atmospheric construct of design in such a way that it contributes positively to customers' experiences of the service setting. In particular, managers should focus on design in relation to customers' experiences in order to evoke feelings of joy.

Originality/value

The study establishes the need to manage customers' atmospheric experiences in winter parks. It also links atmospheric constructs to customers' emotions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Terje Slåtten

The aim of this paper is to undertake an empirical examination of some of the antecedents and effects of positive emotions from an employee perspective. More specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to undertake an empirical examination of some of the antecedents and effects of positive emotions from an employee perspective. More specifically, this study investigates the relationships between one extreme point of discrete types of positive emotions (joy), two types of employee perception (managerial relationship quality and benefit of one's work role), and employees' innovative behaviour in service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presents a conceptual model of the aforementioned relationships. The model of the proposed relationships is tested in a survey study in which 279 frontline employees in the hospitality industry participated.

Findings

It was found that both employee perception of managerial and work role benefit are directly related to employees' feelings of joy and employees' innovative behaviour. Employees' feelings of joy were found to have a direct effect on employees' innovative behaviour. Moreover, it was found that employees' feelings of joy mediate the relationship between the two antecedent variables (managerial relationship quality and work role benefit) and employees' innovative behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to study two antecedents to employees' feelings of joy. Moreover, only one effect of employees' feelings of joy is included in the model.

Practical implications

This paper emphasizes the importance of managers knowing how employees feel about their work role. Therefore, employees' emotions should be taken seriously in service‐quality management. Consequently, one general and key implication from this study is the importance of measuring employees' emotions since it is linked to employees' innovative behaviour when they offer a service to customers.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by enhancing the knowledge on the role of emotions in service‐quality management.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Hanna Berg, Magnus Söderlund and Annika Lindström

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer response to pictures of smiling models in marketing, focusing on the roles of emotional contagion from the smiling models…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer response to pictures of smiling models in marketing, focusing on the roles of emotional contagion from the smiling models and the perceived typicality of marketing with smiling models.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the findings from three experimental studies, comparing consumer response to two versions of an advertisement (Study 1) and a packaging design (Study 2 and 3), including either a picture of a smiling or a non-smiling model. To measure consumer response, a combination of self-report questionnaires and eye-tracking methodology was used.

Findings

The pictures of smiling models produced more consumer joy and more positive attitudes for the marketing. The positive effects on attitudes were mediated by consumer joy, and the effects on consumer joy were mediated by the perceived typicality of the marketing with smiling models.

Originality/value

Despite the ubiquity of photos of smiling faces in marketing, very few studies have isolated the effects of the smile appeal on consumer response to marketing objects. By comparing marketing where the same model is shown smiling or with a neutral facial expression, the positive effects were isolated. The roles of emotional contagion and perceived typicality in this mechanism were also examined and implications of the findings for research and practitioners are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Terje Slåtten

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between: two extreme points of discrete types of emotions (“joy” and “frustration”); two types of managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between: two extreme points of discrete types of emotions (“joy” and “frustration”); two types of managerial practices (“reward” and “empowerment”); and employee‐perceived service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of the aforementioned relationships has been presented, along with hypotheses on these relationships and collected data with a survey study frontline employees in service organizations. This paper has analyzed the data in order to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that employees' feelings of joy and frustration explain more of the variance in employee‐perceived service quality than managerial practices, i.e. “reward” and “empowerment.” Specifically, employees' feelings of frustration are found to be detrimental for employee‐perceived service quality.

Research limitations/implications

This paper limits its focus to two types of managerial practices and two distinct feelings.

Practical implications

The paper has demonstrated the importance for managers to consider how their practices influence the service quality that their employees provide to customers. In particular, managers should be aware of employee's feeling of joy or frustration because of its role in explaining employee‐perceived service quality.

Originality/value

The paper has developed and tested an original conceptual model of a relatively unexplored area of services management.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Tim Gorichanaz

This paper offers a conceptual discussion of repetition and joy in the context of information and their relation to the good life.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a conceptual discussion of repetition and joy in the context of information and their relation to the good life.

Design/methodology/approach

Joy is defined as an integrative element of the good life which can be achieved through repetition. This may be surprising, given that our most ready-to-hand associations with “repetition” are negative in tenor rather than positive. Building on the work of repetition theorists Søren Kierkegaard and Gertrude Stein, we can discern three different forms of repetition: that looking backwards (e.g. rereading), that looking forwards (e.g. art-making) and that looking inwards (e.g. chiasmus). Throughout this paper, information-related examples are given and discussed as vignettes that move the conversation forward.

Findings

These examples lead to a nascent theory of why the repetition of information can spark joy and not just tedium. First, its stability and predictability that instill comfort in us. Second, its unifying force that brings us to experience wholeness. Third, its invitation to keep the repetition going through creation, further helping us feel part of the world. And finally, its paradoxicality—as strict repetition is impossible—which requires change, paving the way for satisfying surprises and delights.

Originality/value

Repetition is a ubiquitous and theoretically interesting phenomenon when it comes to information, and though it is implicit in some information science research, it has not yet been theorized directly. Moreover, this paper connects this issue to an emerging “positive” orientation in information studies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Judy Rollins

Abstract

Details

‘Purpose-built’ Art in Hospitals: Art with Intent
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-681-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Joan Ball and Donald C. Barnes

The purpose of this paper is to combine the evolving fields of customer delight and positive psychology to investigate a broader conceptualization of customer delight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine the evolving fields of customer delight and positive psychology to investigate a broader conceptualization of customer delight. Furthermore, to investigate antecedent variables that impact this broader conceptualization.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed structural equation modeling in a hedonic context.

Findings

Key findings indicate that aside from joy and surprise, gratitude also has a positive impact on customer delight. Furthermore, psychological sense of brand community (PSBC) and transcendent customer experiences (TCE) were shown to positively impact the proximal antecedents of customer delight.

Research limitations/implications

Extending the domain of customer delight beyond joy and surprise contributes to the theoretical discussion on what customer delight represents to the service firm. Further, this research identifies new theoretical relationships between PSBC/TCE and customer delight.

Practical implications

By offering the broader conceptualization of customer delight, this research contributes to the discussion of whether delight is possible or even profitable. Namely, by moving past joy/surprise, this research suggests that managing gratitude can be a strategic lever that the modern service firm can utilize.

Originality/value

This is the first research to evaluate gratitude as an antecedent to customer delight. Further, by combining positive psychology and delight research this research identifies new predictors of positive customer experiences.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Li‐teh Sun

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the…

Abstract

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American preemptive invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent prisoner abuse, such an existence seems to be farther and farther away from reality. The purpose of this work is to stop this dangerous trend by promoting justice, love, and peace through a change of the paradigm that is inconsistent with justice, love, and peace. The strong paradigm that created the strong nation like the U.S. and the strong man like George W. Bush have been the culprit, rather than the contributor, of the above three universal ideals. Thus, rather than justice, love, and peace, the strong paradigm resulted in in justice, hatred, and violence. In order to remove these three and related evils, what the world needs in the beginning of the third millenium is the weak paradigm. Through the acceptance of the latter paradigm, the golden mean or middle paradigm can be formulated, which is a synergy of the weak and the strong paradigm. In order to understand properly the meaning of these paradigms, however, some digression appears necessary.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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