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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

David Egan, Tim Knowles and Joudallah Bey

The licensed retail market in the UK operates in a dynamic environment, yet one aspect that appears to get little consideration is how spatial location may determine the…

Abstract

The licensed retail market in the UK operates in a dynamic environment, yet one aspect that appears to get little consideration is how spatial location may determine the success of particular business or, influence the appropriate use of an existing licensed premises. This paper suggests that it is possible to develop a model of location that can help to explain the location of licensed premises. Additionally, it explores the type of criteria that should be explicitly considered when establishing a new development or the repackaging of an existing licensed unit. At the outset it should be emphasised that the authors are not trying to explain the location of all licensed premises but a model of intra‐urban location, rooted in economic theory, to try and explain the location of different types of licensed businesses within urban areas. The aim is to develop a model that will explain the observable spatial pattern of licensed premises within the major cities of the UK.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Tim Knowles and David Egan

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid…

Abstract

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid consolidation of the brewing sector in an attempt to achieve economies of scale in production, distribution and marketing. The dominance of the national brewers has allowed them to place increased product emphasis on marketing and me power of brands — particularly lager, me national breweries control all me major lager brands. In tandem with these brewers, me growth and dominance of me national pub chains has garnered apace over the past ten years and in order to maximise profit margins they have established supply arrangements with me national brewers; it has been in the interests of these chains to limit choice thereby maximising the discounts received from their suppliers. The article therefore shows that regional and local brewers cannot compete on price. Competition between pubs is also highlighted. Because beer prices are relatively inelastic, emphasis is placed on the level of amenities provided in pubs, and in particular the branding of pub outlets. Key among these amenities is the provision of food, which now accounts for a substantial percentage of total pub sales.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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