Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2008

Arnaud G. Malan and Josua P. Meyer

Downloads
474

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Jaco Dirker, Arnaud G. Malan and Josua P. Meyer

This paper aims to investigate thermal geometric optimisation of rectangular heat conductive cooling structures within solid heat‐generating media for the purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate thermal geometric optimisation of rectangular heat conductive cooling structures within solid heat‐generating media for the purpose of minimising peak temperatures and enabling optimum use of spatial volume within integrated power electronics.

Design/methodology/approach

A vortex‐centred finite volume numerical solver was developed, employing a fully implicit solution algorithm to obtain 3D temperature distributions. By comparing the peak temperatures obtained for a wide range of related cases, optimised cross‐sectional shapes for particular input conditions were obtained.

Findings

Optimum shapes are dependent on seven identified parameters. In cases where a low percentage of volume is occupied by cooling structures, a high tendency exists for continuous thin cooling layers, as opposed to discrete rectangular cooling inserts, to present the best thermal behaviour. At higher volume percentages, the opposite is true.

Practical implications

The reduced dimensions of cooling inserts have caused manufacturability to be a concern. Research has shown that at small dimensional scale ranges the cross‐sectional shape of the cooling insert has little influence on its thermal performance. In such cases little or no thermal advantage or loss is incurred by making use of continuous cooling layers, which are easiest to manufacture.

Originality/value

The tendencies of optimum cooling structure shapes were obtained and described in terms of seven geometric and material property‐related parameters. Thermal performance of individual inserts is not linearly proportional to dimensional scaling and it was found that, at small‐scale ranges, optimisation from a manufacturing viewpoint would not significantly impact on thermal performance.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Lelanie Smith, Oliver Oxtoby, A. Malan and Josua Meyer

– The purpose of this paper is to introduce a unique technique to couple the two-integral boundary layer solutions to a generic inviscid solver in an iterative fashion.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a unique technique to couple the two-integral boundary layer solutions to a generic inviscid solver in an iterative fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

The boundary layer solution is obtained using the two-integral method to solve displacement thickness point by point with a local Newton method, at a fraction of the cost of a conventional mesh-based, full viscous solution. The boundary layer solution is coupled with an existing inviscid solver. Coupling occurs by moving the wall to a streamline at the computed boundary layer thickness and treating it as a slip boundary, then solving the flow again and iterating. The Goldstein singularity present when solving boundary layer equations is overcome by solving an auxiliary velocity equation along with the displacement thickness.

Findings

The proposed method obtained favourable results when compared with the analytical solutions for flat and inclined plates. Further, it was applied to modelling the flow around a NACA0012 airfoil and yielded results similar to those of the widely used XFOIL code.

Originality/value

A unique method is proposed for coupling of the boundary layer solution to the inviscid flow. Rather than the traditional transpiration boundary condition, mesh movement is employed to simulate the boundary layer thickness in a more physically meaningful way. Further, a new auxiliary velocity equation is presented to circumvent the Goldstein singularity.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3