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Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

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Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Creative Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-146-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Joshua Prasad, Danielle M. Gardner, Frederick T. Leong, Jinmei Zhang and Christopher D. Nye

This work contributes to the literature on career adaptability by examining the criterion validity of the Cooperation dimension, supporting the inclusion of cooperation…

Abstract

Purpose

This work contributes to the literature on career adaptability by examining the criterion validity of the Cooperation dimension, supporting the inclusion of cooperation into the career adaptability construct and informing the nomological network of career adaptability (Nye et al., 2018; Savickas and Porfeli, 2012). The authors also evaluate the improvements in cross-cultural generalizability argued for by Nye et al. (2018) by conducting a criterion validity study of the CAAS including cooperation using a non-Western sample.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from a Chinese adult working sample (N = 208, 53.4% male) were analyzed via relative weights analysis, facilitating the comparison of the Cooperation dimension to other career adaptability dimensions and general adaptability.

Findings

Results demonstrate the added value of the Cooperation dimension across several work outcomes (i.e. work engagement, career commitment, occupational well-being, occupational stress) and highlight Cooperation in predicting interpersonal outcomes (i.e. supervisor and coworker satisfaction).

Originality/value

The inclusion of Cooperation, a dimension originally conceptualized as a career adaptability factor but only recently subjected to additional psychometric evaluation, within the career adaptability paradigm should promote both predictive validity and cross-cultural generalizability.

Details

Career Development International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article

Joshua Woods and Vladimir Shlapentokh

This article investigates the possibility of studying modern organizations with the feudal model. We introduce feudalism as an ideal type and explain why it is necessary…

Abstract

This article investigates the possibility of studying modern organizations with the feudal model. We introduce feudalism as an ideal type and explain why it is necessary for understanding organizations. The model synthesizes several perspectives on intra-organizational conflict. After defining the feudal model and tracing its theoretical roots, we review several empirical studies to identify the conditions under which feudal conflicts arise. These factors include decentralization, structural interdependence, uncertainty and informal power. The feudal model highlights several overlooked aspects of organizations, including personal relations, the manipulation of formal rules, bribery, corruption and sabotage. However, given the model's limitations, we propose a “segmented approach” to social analysis, which emphasizes the need for multiple models to explain any organization, past or present.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article

Cynthia Courtois, Maude Plante and Pier-Luc Lajoie

This study aims to better understand how academics-in-the-making construe doctoral performance and the impacts of this construal on their positioning in relation to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to better understand how academics-in-the-making construe doctoral performance and the impacts of this construal on their positioning in relation to doctoral performance expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on 25 semi-structured interviews with PhD students from Canadian, Dutch, Scottish and Australian business schools.

Findings

Based on Decoteau’s (2016) concept of reflexive habitus, this study highlights how doctoral students’ construal is influenced by their previous experiences and by expectations from other adjacent fields in which they simultaneously gravitate. This leads them to adopt a position oscillating between resistance and compliance in relation to their understanding of doctoral performance expectations promoted in the academic field.

Research limitations/implications

The concept of reflexivity, as understood by Decoteau (2016), is found to be pivotal when an individual integrates into a new field.

Practical implications

This study encourages business schools to review expectations regarding doctoral performance. These expectations should be clear, but they should also leave room for PhD students to preserve their academic aspirations.

Originality/value

It is beneficial to empirically clarify the influence of performance expectations in academia on the reflexivity of PhD students, as the majority of studies exploring this topic mainly leverage auto-ethnographic data.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

1 – 10 of 19