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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Josh Bendickson, Jeff Muldoon, Eric W. Liguori and Phillip E. Davis

By revisiting the agency theory literature, this paper aims to both incrementally advance historical viewpoints and reveal four prominent influences on agency theory…

Abstract

Purpose

By revisiting the agency theory literature, this paper aims to both incrementally advance historical viewpoints and reveal four prominent influences on agency theory: Weber and Simon, The Great Depression, Cooperation and the Chicago School. This is critical given that understanding the history behind the authors’ major theoretical lenses is fundamental to using these theories to explain various phenomena.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a plethora of archival sources and following the influence-mapping approach used by other management history scholars, this manuscript synthesizes historical accounts and archival information to provide a clearer picture of the major historical influences in the formation of agency theory.

Findings

We shed light on four areas related to management history that helped propel agency theory. Whereas past scholarship has not recognised them as influencers, we find and show how the industrial revolution, unionization, the stock exchange and other management approaches all played a role in the development of agency theory’s core tenants.

Originality/value

We extend upon the influential people and events that shaped agency theory, thus providing a fuller understanding of the theory’s usefulness. Moreover, we fill in gaps enabling scholars to better understand the context in which the core tenants of agency theory were developed.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Birton J. Cowden and Joshua S. Bendickson

Many factors influence entrepreneurs, some of which influence the level of innovation (i.e. innovative or imitative) of new products or services pursued. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many factors influence entrepreneurs, some of which influence the level of innovation (i.e. innovative or imitative) of new products or services pursued. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the psychological motivations of the entrepreneurs and their institutional setting on the innovativeness of the new venture they pursue. Through this exploration, we can gain a better understanding of how innovative new ventures still occur in varying institutional environments.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to deliver the authors’ propositions as they pertain to innovation, the authors review the literature on entrepreneurs’ default regulatory focus (i.e. promotion or prevention seeking) and the strength of the institutions in which they are operating.

Findings

The authors theorize that promotion focus enhances innovativeness of ventures while prevention focus enhances imitativeness of ventures. The authors also provide a conceptual framework for the interplay among institutions and regulatory focus and provide a typology for how these varying combinations impact innovativeness or imitativeness of venture type.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors discuss and unpack the entrepreneurial mindset in order to bridge gaps between institutions and cognitive motivations of entrepreneurs as they pertain to innovativeness of venture type. By synthesizing several areas of research, the authors shed light on entrepreneurs’ innovativeness by proposing how these factors work together in determining whether an entrepreneur’s venture is more or less innovative based on regulatory disposition and in different institutional settings.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Curtis F. Matherne III, Joshua S. Bendickson, Susana C. Santos and Erik C. Taylor

Individuals adopt differing perceptions of entrepreneurial types, including small businesses, scalable businesses and social businesses. This study aims to suggest that…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals adopt differing perceptions of entrepreneurial types, including small businesses, scalable businesses and social businesses. This study aims to suggest that individuals' entrepreneurial personal theory (EPT: learning from experiences that informs how an individual conceptualizes entrepreneurship) influences entrepreneurial intent, and that sensemaking facilitates this process such that those with a clearer understanding of different entrepreneurship paths are more likely to pursue opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study theorizes and empirically tests whether EPT affects an individual's intent to start a small business, a scalable business or a social enterprise and how gender moderates the relationship between EPT and entrepreneurial intent. Primary survey data were collected from undergraduate business students and working adults.

Findings

The results indicate that EPTs characterized by small business, scalable business and social entrepreneurship have a positive association with entrepreneurial intentions. However, gender interaction effects showed that for women, an EPT characterized as small business has a weaker relationship with entrepreneurial intent, whereas an EPT characterized as social entrepreneurship has a stronger relationship with entrepreneurial intent. The notions that gender directly affects personal conceptions of entrepreneurship and that women may have not been exposed to all facets of entrepreneurship are addressed.

Research limitations/implications

Other variables not included in this study could also influence the relationship between how the type of entrepreneurship may shape entrepreneurial intent and how such relationship may be influenced by gender. Implications for entrepreneurship education and curriculum development are presented.

Originality/value

Integrating the EPT and sensemaking to uncover gender differences in the development of entrepreneurial intentions is a novel theoretical discussion.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Furkan Amil Gur, Joshua S. Bendickson, Laura Madden and William C. McDowell

Disasters drastically affect regional industries; consequently, the study of regional resilience is of much interest to organizational researchers. To that end, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Disasters drastically affect regional industries; consequently, the study of regional resilience is of much interest to organizational researchers. To that end, this study examines the role of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition, stakeholder engagement, and elements of psychological recovery in the US Gulf Coast following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a qualitative content analysis of 183 industry-relevant articles published during and after the disaster, this study unpacks the most significant themes at work in the recovery process, including the psychological elements of the oil spill and its aftermath, the role of various internal and external stakeholders, and emerging opportunities for entrepreneurial activity in the region for regional resilience and recovery.

Findings

The nine themes that emerged from the data were captured in three categories mapped over time. Category one, psychogical states during and after the oil spill, include denial, coping, and recovery. Category two, regional recovery efforts and the role of stakeholders, includes the themes distractions, bargains, and material support. Category three, emerging opportunities, includes financial support, new markets, and reparations.

Originality/value

By mapping these themes over distinct time periods, this study identifies and explores patterns in the recovery period and use them to draw theoretical and practical implications.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Jeff Muldoon, Eric W. Liguori, Josh Bendickson and Antonina Bauman

This paper aims to correct some misconceptions about George Homans. Specifically, it clarifies the relationship between Homans and Malinowski, explains why Homans is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to correct some misconceptions about George Homans. Specifically, it clarifies the relationship between Homans and Malinowski, explains why Homans is rightfully considered the father of social exchange, shows Homans’ perspective on altruism and self-interest and analyses Homans’ place in management’s complex history.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper which synthesizes both primary and secondary sources on Homans, social exchange theory (SET), Malinowski and other Homans’ contemporaries and theories, which, in aggregate, help dispel some common misconceptions in the literature today.

Findings

This paper disperses several common misconceptions about Homans and his work. First, the findings show that beliefs that Homans was unaware of Malinowski are not justified, as Homans was not only aware of Malinowski but also significantly influenced by Malinowski’s work. Second, this manuscript clarifies that while Homans, for specific reasons, focussed on self-interest, his work accounted for altruism. Lastly, this paper also further cements Homans’ place in history as the father of social exchange.

Originality/value

Recent misconceptions have emerged in the literature calling to question not only Homans’ legitimacy as the father of social exchange but also some of his views on the theory itself. By clarifying these misconceptions, this paper enables scholars from a variety of management fields to better understand historical foundations of SET and its impact on current research.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Birton J. Cowden, Jintong Tang and Josh Bendickson

A large body of research has exhibited the positive effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm performance. However, research that attempts to explore what happens…

Abstract

A large body of research has exhibited the positive effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm performance. However, research that attempts to explore what happens to high EO firms when they mature is sorely needed. Every firm establishes a heritage over time that impacts future capabilities. In the current research, we build on the international business literature to examine how a firmʼs administrative heritage moderates the long-term effects of the EO-performance relationship, examined through the firmʼs asset specificity, founder tenure, and home culture embeddedness. From this, implications are derived for EO retention and the firmʼs awareness of administrative heritage and how to shape it to their advantage.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Jeff Muldoon, Joshua Bendickson, Antonina Bauman and Eric W. Liguori

Elton Mayo was a professor at a prestigious university, but not a researcher; a scholar, but more concerned with executives; a capitalist, but someone who downplayed…

Abstract

Purpose

Elton Mayo was a professor at a prestigious university, but not a researcher; a scholar, but more concerned with executives; a capitalist, but someone who downplayed monetary incentives; an insider, but someone whose own background was more of an outsider. These contradictions have resulted in scholars questioning Mayo’s impact on the field of management. Thus, this paper aims to critically review Mayo and his contributions to management through a lens calibrated to the context of his time, providing a more contextually accurate view of Mayo and his work and offering a clearer view of his meaningful impact on the field.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, the authors connect otherwise disparate information to critically review Mayo’s work within the context of its era.

Findings

The authors’ critical review of Mayo identified nine topical areas where Mayo and/or his work have been misunderstood or misinterpreted. For each area, the authors offer a more contextualized and appropriate interpretation of Mayo and his viewpoints, and thus more accurately informing the management literature.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to thoroughly revisit Mayo and his work through a contextualized lens, offering a more informed view of why Mayo’s seemingly controversial behaviors were actually quite standard behaviors given his context.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Eric Liguori, Jeff Muldoon and Josh Bendickson

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential education is key if the authors as scholar-educators are to empower the next generation of students to recognize opportunities, exploit them and succeed in entrepreneurship. Experiences facilitate the bridge between theory and practice; experiencing something serves as the linking process between action and thought. Capitalizing on technological advances of the last two decades, this paper depicts how film can be (and why it should be) incorporated into entrepreneurship classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the learning literature, broadly defined, to assess and articulate the experiential nature of film. More specifically, this paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. In doing so, this paper assesses two feature films and provide educators with a guide for their use in the classroom.

Findings

This paper establishes a framework for film as an experiential pedagogical approach, offering theoretical connections and best practice recommendations. It concludes with two actionable case examples, broad enough they are deployable in almost any entrepreneurship classroom, assuming English is the primary language.

Originality/value

This paper brings to life a concept some have long assumed is effective, but the literature often neglects: the use of film as an experiential medium. In doing so, two new case examples are developed and available for immediate deployment into classrooms.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Thomas Pittz, Joshua S. Bendickson, Birton J. Cowden and Phillip E. Davis

Owners of the US-based sport teams are seeing consistent gains on their financial investments, no matter the success of their teams on the playing field or their impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

Owners of the US-based sport teams are seeing consistent gains on their financial investments, no matter the success of their teams on the playing field or their impact on the surrounding community. Sports teams are a part of an ecosystem comprised of primary and secondary stakeholders. The authors explore this phenomenon using a stakeholder perspective to understand how different business models and ownership structures optimize stakeholder value.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ an evaluative conceptual approach to examine the dominant model in the US, European ownership structures and public-private partnerships (PPPs). T finalize these comparisons by exploring a fourth business model and ownership structure – a relatively unique option in the US deployed by the Green Bay Packers – which we refer to as the maximized value partnership (MVP). These comparisons are followed by practical advice for owners in regard to these governance mechanisms.

Findings

The MVP ownership model has the potential to level the playing field between public and private actors. This potential is realized by fusing some of the best practices from European football clubs, in particular aspects of the stock market and supporter trust models.

Originality/value

By evaluating the most common ownership structures for sports teams, t provide an alternative model as well as practical advice for owners.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Jeffrey Muldoon, Jennifer L. Kisamore, Eric W. Liguori, I.M. Jawahar and Joshua Bendickson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether job meaning and job autonomy moderate the relationship between emotional stability and organizational citizenship behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether job meaning and job autonomy moderate the relationship between emotional stability and organizational citizenship behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 190 supervisor-subordinate dyads completed three surveys. Linear and curvilinear analyses were used to assess the data.

Findings

Results indicate emotionally stable individuals are more likely to perform OCBOs in low autonomy and/or low job meaning situations than are employees low in emotional stability. Conversely, individuals who have high autonomy and/or high meaning jobs are likely to engage in OCBOs regardless of personality.

Research limitations/implications

As a survey-based research study, causal conclusions cannot be drawn from this study. Results suggest future research on the personality-performance relationship needs to more closely consider context and the potential for curvilinear relationships.

Practical implications

Managers should note that personality may significantly affect job performance and consider placing individuals in jobs that best align with their personality strengths.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on factors which may have led to erroneous conclusions in the extant literature that the relationship between personality and performance is weak.

1 – 10 of 18