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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Ibrahim Yucel, Joseph Zupko and Magy Seif El‐Nasr

Researchers have argued that video games have great utility for learning. Games promote experiential learning and can be used to facilitate active learning. This paper examines…

Abstract

Researchers have argued that video games have great utility for learning. Games promote experiential learning and can be used to facilitate active learning. This paper examines the potential of video games in education. In particular, it examines the benefits of game modding compared to playing and/or creating games. However, video game classes have been primarily attended by male students. This paper looks further into the gender issue regarding the use of video game modding in education. This is demonstrated through a course developed by the authors on game design. The main goal of the course was to introduce middle school and high school female students to IT and assist them in acquiring five basic IT skills. During the course, survey data was collected from participating students. Results from the surveys as well as analysis of student projects and anecdotal evidence suggest that using video game modding is successful in increasing self‚Äźefficacy and motivation as well as teaching female students basic IT skills.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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