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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Jose V. Gavidia

While the need for information systems is regularly highlighted in the humanitarian logistics literature, a detailed model of what such system would look like is missing…

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1298

Abstract

Purpose

While the need for information systems is regularly highlighted in the humanitarian logistics literature, a detailed model of what such system would look like is missing. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need and advantages of enterprise resource planning (ERP) technology in humanitarian emergency logistics. The paper also proposes a model for the configuration, maintenance, operation, and improvement of the system.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper uses existing logistics and information systems literature to build the logical case for an integrated enterprise system for humanitarian emergencies, and to propose conceptual content and process models.

Findings

The problem of lack of coordination is reviewed, and a holistic solution is proposed through a structure and model of ERP systems technology to meet the specific requirements of humanitarian emergencies.

Research limitations/implications

As in any conceptual paper, a limitation of this paper is the lack of empirical validation of the proposed system. It also might be difficult to obtain the cooperation of multiple organizations. This research focuses on emergency humanitarian logistics, where effectiveness and speed have priority over simplicity or cost.

Practical implications

The model proposed in this paper links current efforts in humanitarian emergency coordination with existing supply chain information technologies, and is practically feasible both from the technological and organizational perspectives.

Social implications

Because of the critical, life or death nature of the problem, social and ethical implications of this research are broad, including the divergence of coordination in humanitarian vs commercial and military logistics, as well as inter-agency politics.

Originality/value

This paper is a bold but realistic attempt to take a holistic view of humanitarian logistics and design a system that would be effective, and calls humanitarian organizations worldwide to collaborate in its implementation.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Marvin E. González, Gioconda Quesada, Ignacio Urrutia and José V. Gavidia

The purpose of this article is to describe the design and development of an e‐health strategy for the Spanish health care system. Using quality function deployment and…

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2096

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe the design and development of an e‐health strategy for the Spanish health care system. Using quality function deployment and benchmarking analysis as an analytical model, a strategy in e‐health care is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses the case of a Spanish community to build a general framework for e‐health system development. Based on a multi‐disciplinary literature, and the specific needs of a community, the process of e‐health system development is analyzed and reduced into a series of phases that form an integrated method. Best practice managerial techniques are adapted to the healthcare industry and the inter‐relationships between them are mapped in a theoretical model that results in the desired outcomes.

Findings

This analysis produces a road‐map to e‐health system development consisting of several phases: analysis of the current situation of the system and determination of objectives; collection and analysis of customer expectations; development of an action plan through cross‐evaluation of customer and system needs; cost and strategic analyses; and evaluation and control systems. Managerial implications are provided.

Originality/value

The strategy proposed in this article is a prototype and an ongoing study in the Castilla‐La Mancha community.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Jose V. Gavidia

In spite of the large body of literature on success factors of enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation, there is a need to explore its multinational dimension…

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1489

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the large body of literature on success factors of enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation, there is a need to explore its multinational dimension. The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the conflict between parent and subsidiary on the process of ERP implementation in a multinational enterprise (MNE).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretive case study methodology, this paper analyses the theoretical frameworks of parent-subsidiary conflict and applies them to interpret an in-depth case study and generate a set of managerial prescriptions.

Findings

Theoretical analysis and case evidence suggest that managing parent-subsidiary conflict is a critical success factor of ERP implementation in MNEs.

Research limitations/implications

This case relates to a diversified multinational group producing a variety of materials through subsidiaries. The data collection includes multiple sources in the company, and strong theoretical development provides a high level of generalizability. The paper shows that managers should consider the impact of conflict from the planning stages of any multinational ERP implementation.

Practical implications

A detailed set of practical managerial prescriptions is derived from case and theoretical analysis. These prescriptions provide guidance to multinational managers planning a successful global ERP rollout.

Originality/value

Although parent-subsidiary conflict is clearly a major factor in multinational ERP implementations, this topic has never been analysed in detail in the literature. This paper breaks new ground applying grounded theoretical frameworks of parent-subsidiary conflict to an implementation case, and providing managerial guidance for implementation decisions.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Robert L. Engle, Nikolay Dimitriadi, Jose V. Gavidia, Christopher Schlaegel, Servane Delanoe, Irene Alvarado, Xiaohong He, Samuel Buame and Birgitta Wolff

The purpose of this paper is to test the ability of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior to predict entrepreneurial intent in 12 countries representing all ten of the global…

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8090

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the ability of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior to predict entrepreneurial intent in 12 countries representing all ten of the global regional clusters as identified in the GLOBE project.

Design/methodology/approach

Ajzen's model was operationalized to address entrepreneurial intent and a questionnaire was developed consisting of previously used scales, as well as a new measure of entrepreneurial autonomy. A total of 1,748 usable questionnaires were collected from university business students in 12 countries.

Findings

The results suggest that Ajzen's model of planned behavior, as operationalized in this study, does successfully predict entrepreneurial intent in each of the study countries, although as foreseen by Ajzen, the significant contributing model elements differ by country as does the percent of the variance explained by the model, although one model element, social norms, was a significant predictor of entrepreneurial intent in each country.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to provide insight to the role of cognition in the entrepreneurial process by examining a model of planned behavior in countries representing all global regional culture clusters. The paper also provides guidance for future entrepreneurial research and individual development of entrepreneurs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Luana Ferreira-Lopes, Iciar Elexpuru-Albizuri and María José Bezanilla

Allowing for interaction with foreign cultures without the need to travel, intercultural virtual collaboration represents a potential tool to develop business students…

Abstract

Purpose

Allowing for interaction with foreign cultures without the need to travel, intercultural virtual collaboration represents a potential tool to develop business students’ intercultural competence. This study aims to explore students’ perceptions towards the implementation of a research-based task sequence in a project in which undergraduate Business students from Spain collaborated virtually with undergraduate business students from The Netherlands during a semester. More specifically, this paper investigates what intercultural competence indicators were mostly developed by the sequence implemented; how much each task from the sequence in question developed different intercultural competence indicators; and how much students enjoyed participating in each task.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through after-task reflection questionnaires. A quantitative analysis of Likert-type questions was carried out and open-ended responses were used to illustrate findings.

Findings

Results reveal that the task sequence developed different dimensions of students’ intercultural competence and, particularly, fostered a positive attitude towards intercultural relationships, increased students’ cultural knowledge and awareness and equipped students with skills to work in diverse teams. It also showed that as complexity grew along the sequence, the average students’ perception of their intercultural competence development tended to decrease. The majority of students’ very much liked participating in the different tasks.

Originality/value

Designing telecollaborative projects can be very challenging and understanding the learning potential of different pedagogical strategies for virtual collaborative environments can help teachers to take better-informed decisions.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Christine Wamsler

Imagine, for a moment, human settlements that are organised to overcome and withstand earthquakes or hurricanes, infrastructures that reinforce themselves and seal cracks…

Abstract

Imagine, for a moment, human settlements that are organised to overcome and withstand earthquakes or hurricanes, infrastructures that reinforce themselves and seal cracks of their own accord, or buildings that elevate themselves during flooding. Imagine settlements that provide information systems that warn when a tsunami is approaching, or when houses are overburdened and may be liable to imminent collapse due to landslides, fire or other hazards. Such human settlements would secure the livelihood of all their inhabitants, empowering them to cope and deal with natural threats. As with a living organism, these settlements would adjust their social, political and economic systems in such a rapid way that they can account for damage, effect repairs, learn from experience, and retire - urbanely - once they can no longer fulfil their protective and defensible function.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

José L. Ruiz-Alba, Anabela Soares, Miguel Angel Rodríguez-Molina and Arnaud Banoun

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how gamification can influence entrepreneurial intentions (EI) of a group of users of an online platform provided by a private company.

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1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how gamification can influence entrepreneurial intentions (EI) of a group of users of an online platform provided by a private company.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research strategy was used with a sample of 220 respondents. These respondents were tested before and after the gamification experience.

Findings

Main findings support literature suggesting a clear effect of attitudes towards behaviour and perceived behavioural control on EI, in line with the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Once the basic assumptions of TPB were confirmed, the authors tested the effects of gamification comparing before and after results. Main findings highlight an increase of these effects after the gamification experience, aligned with the self-determination theory.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that gamification is able to influence entrepreneurial behaviours. This contributes to both companies and educators’ knowledge on training for EI with gamification and the use of online platforms to this effect. Recommendations are provided.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates the impact of gamification on EI and how gamification can influence the different relationships between the antecedents of EI.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Carla Bustamante, Carlos Poblete and José Ernesto Amorós

This research aims to explore the moderating effect of a natural disaster on the well-studied relationship between entrepreneurship-oriented beliefs (behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the moderating effect of a natural disaster on the well-studied relationship between entrepreneurship-oriented beliefs (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs) and entrepreneurial intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor before and after the earthquake that took place in Chile on February 27, 2010. The study was performed by applying a multilevel hierarchical logit regression over a sample of 14,724 individuals from the six more affected regions.

Findings

The results indicate that a natural disasters shape the relationship between entrepreneurial intentions and all its three motivational antecedents, however in opposing directions. The results also suggest that a natural disaster strengthens the relationship between entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial intentions; nevertheless the effect of subjective norms becomes less relevant in shaping entrepreneurial intentions. Furthermore, the authors found that the earthquake had a positive effect on the relationship between perceived behavioral control and entrepreneurial intentions.

Originality/value

This study advances the emerging stream of research on the micro-level consequences of exogenous shocks and how they shape individual functioning. A key implication for policymakers wishing to facilitate the recovery phase after a natural disaster is that it is important to focus on fostering entrepreneurship by developing individuals' personal attitude and perceived control over the firm-creation behavior, rather than relying on the perceived social pressure to become an entrepreneur.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Inmaculada Soldado Serrano, José García Doblado, Ignazio Federico Finazzi and María Ángeles Martín Prats

Until now, air navigation systems have mainly relied on global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on the worldwide spread global positioning system. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Until now, air navigation systems have mainly relied on global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on the worldwide spread global positioning system. However, the so-called GNSS-denied environments open a new research line which pursues the development of alternative technologies which will cover this gap in positioning systems’ services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the possibility of using positioning systems based on global system for mobile communications (GSM) signal. This approach developed in a standalone device will provide real-time information. The presented algorithm pursues a new methodology for providing useful information.

Findings

Among all the different technologies aimed at giving a navigation solution in the absence of any kind of GNSS in which this paper is based, it advocates for the use of the signals of opportunity, particularly the usage of GSM.

Practical implications

Technology is currently immersed in an era of continuous progress and expansion of navigation systems. These are evolving toward high performance systems, offering precise, efficient and safe air navigation. In addition, the growing demand for unmanned aerial vehicles increases the level of exigency on this activity even more. Therefore, in the context of the development of unmanned navigation technologies, the aim is to implement positioning systems that will allow high precision even in though environments.

Originality/value

Referencing the SIMless concept, a SIM-free system is described in this paper. The SIM-free system is supported by open data bases and permits the positioning based on the information sniffed from the signals broadcast by a set of several nearby base station of the GSM network. Hence, it provides same and in some cases even better accuracies than the already developed techniques, not being necessary to synchronize the link between the mobile terminal and the base station transceiver (BTS).

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 90 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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