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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Manish K. Dixit, Charles H. Culp, Jose L. Fernandez-Solis and Sarel Lavy

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of a life cycle approach in facilities management practices to reduce the carbon footprint of built facilities. A…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of a life cycle approach in facilities management practices to reduce the carbon footprint of built facilities. A model to holistic life cycle energy and carbon reduction is also proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature-based discovery approach was applied to collect, analyze and synthesize the results of published case studies from around the globe. The energy use results of 95 published case studies were analyzed to derive conclusions.

Findings

A comparison of energy-efficient and conventional facilities revealed that decreasing operating energy may increase the embodied energy components. Additionally, the analysis of 95 commercial buildings indicated that nearly 10 per cent of the total US carbon emissions was influenced by facilities management practices.

Research limitations/implications

The results were derived from case studies that belonged to various locations across the globe and included facilities constructed with a variety of materials.

Practical implications

The proposed approach to holistic carbon footprint reduction can guide facility management research and practice to make meaningful contributions to the efforts for creating a sustainable built environment.

Originality/value

This paper quantifies the extent to which a facilities management professional can contribute to the global efforts of reducing carbon emission.

Details

Facilities, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Sarel Lavy and Jose L. Fernández‐Solis

Literature review indicates that Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – Accredited Professionals (LEED APs) practicing during the first ten years of LEED in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature review indicates that Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – Accredited Professionals (LEED APs) practicing during the first ten years of LEED in the building industry hold perceptions that have influenced the adoption of LEED. These perceptions may include that some LEED credit points are more difficult to obtain than others, LEED projects have higher first costs, and LEED projects have higher levels of complexity. The literature also indicates that the relationship between these three topics merits research attention, in an effort to discover the magnitude of those perceptions. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Both self‐administered questionnaires and interviews are utilized to secure information directly from practitioners. Out of a pool of 8,000 possible interviewees, a total of 102 qualified respondents participated in the cross‐sectional survey. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software is used to analyze the data derived from the survey information and to arrive at conclusions.

Findings

The survey identify which LEED credit points are perceived by LEED APs as more difficult, as contributing to higher initial costs and as increasing project complexity. The conclusions indicate a trend toward a higher adoption rate of points that are perceived as having lower initial costs and a lower level of complexity. These findings are primarily due to two reasons: increased cost in managing project documentation; and increased cost in project complexity.

Originality/value

The results of this study can be used by designers, construction professionals, and facility managers who are involved in new construction projects. The trends in credit point adoption, and the professionals' perceptions of their initial cost and level of complexity, may encourage others to consider using systems that introduce sustainability concepts into their design and construction process.

Details

Facilities, vol. 27 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Manish K. Dixit, Charles H. Culp, Sarel Lavy and Jose Fernandez-Solis

The recurrent embodied energy (REE) is the energy consumed in the maintenance, replacement and retrofit processes of a facility. The purpose of this paper was to analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

The recurrent embodied energy (REE) is the energy consumed in the maintenance, replacement and retrofit processes of a facility. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the relationship of REE with the service life and life cycle embodied energy. The amount of variation in the reported REE values is also determined and discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach that is known as the literature based discovery (LBD) was adopted. Existing literature was surveyed to gather case studies and to analyze the reported values of REE.

Findings

The reported values of REE showed considerable variation across referred studies. It was also found that the reported REE values demonstrated a moderate positive correlation with the service life but a very strong positive correlation with the life cycle embodied energy of both the residential and commercial facilities.

Research limitations/implications

This review paper pointed out the importance of the maintenance and replacement processes in reducing the life cycle energy use in a facility. Future research could focus on performing case studies to evaluate this relationship.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the significance of REE in reducing the life cycle energy impacts of a facility. As facility managers routinely deal with maintenance and replacement processes, they hold an important responsibility of reducing the life cycle energy.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper would motivate the facilities management professionals to prefer long service life materials and components during the postconstruction phases of a built facility.

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Gregory Usher and Stephen Jonathan Whitty

The purpose of this paper is to expand project management theory about practice and theory for practice through a new conceptual model developed from the transformational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand project management theory about practice and theory for practice through a new conceptual model developed from the transformational production management, strategic management and complexity bodies of theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a grounded theory methodology. A preliminary model is developed and tested against two case studies. The model is revised and tested using a purposively selected focus group before being presented in this paper.

Findings

The research indicates that the “final state convergence model” which has been synthesized from the transformational production management, strategic management and complexity theories. The model illuminates the complexities that can exist within the practice of project management.

Research limitations/implications

The final state convergence model provides a novel approach to synthesizing new bodies of theory into traditional project management theory.

Practical implications

The model challenges practitioners to think beyond their current conceptual base of traditional project management methodologies, systems, and processes toward a broader conceptualization of project management.

Originality/value

The research adds to the theory about practice and theory for practice through the development of a new model which not only illuminates the complexities of project management but enriches and extends the understanding of the actual reality of projects and project management practices.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Emmanuel Itodo Daniel and Christine Pasquire

The purpose of this paper is to present the current knowledge surrounding social value (SV) and show how lean approach supports SV realisation in the delivery of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the current knowledge surrounding social value (SV) and show how lean approach supports SV realisation in the delivery of construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical literature review was adopted, to gather the current knowledge surrounding SV from mainstream management sciences, construction management and lean literature. A total of 70 studies were critically reviewed.

Findings

The study establishes that the current level of awareness on SV is still low and there is a dearth of scholarly publications on SV especially in the construction management literature. The investigation reveals the potentials of lean approach in supporting the delivery of SV on construction projects.

Social implications

This study conceptualises the community and the physical environment around where the construction project is executed as customers using lean production approach. It shows that the transformation, flow and value view supports smooth workflow, which enhances the achievement of SV objectives. This creates a new insight into how SV can be realised in construction project delivery.

Originality/value

This study extends the on-going debate around the need for SV in construction project delivery and contributes to construction management and lean construction literature on SV. Future studies could build on this to obtain empirical data and develop an approach/method that would support the evidencing of SV delivery on construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Susanne Balslev Nielsen, Anna-Liisa Sarasoja and Kirsten Ramskov Galamba

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop…

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3260

Abstract

Purpose

Climate adaptation, energy efficiency, sustainable development and green growth are societal challenges for which the Facilities Management (FM) profession can develop solutions and make positive contributions on the organisational level and with societal-level effects. To base the emerging sub-discipline of sustainable facilities management (SFM) on research, an overview of current studies is needed. The purpose of this literature review is to provide exactly this overview.

Design/methodology/approach

This article identifies and examines current research studies on SFM through a comprehensive and systematic literature review. The literature review included screening of 85 identified scientific journals and almost 20,000 articles from the period of 2007-2012. Of the articles reviewed, 151 were identified as key articles and categorised according to topic.

Findings

The literature review indicated that the current research varies in focus, methodology and application of theory, and it was concluded that the current research primary addresses environmental sustainability, whereas the current research which takes an integrated strategic approach to SFM is limited. The article includes lists of reviewed journals and articles to support the further development of SFM in research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review includes literature from 2007 to 2012, to manage the analytical process within the project period. However, with the current categorisation and the access to the reviewed journals and articles, it is possible to continue with the latest literature.

Practical implications

The article provides an overview of theoretical and practical knowledge which can guide: how to document and measure the performance of building operations in terms of environmental, social and economical impacts? How to improve the sustainability performance of buildings? What are the potentials for and barriers to integrating sustainability into FM on strategic, tactical and operational levels?

Originality/value

The paper presents the most comprehensive literature study on SFM so far, and represents an important knowledge basis which is likely to become a key reference point for pioneers and scholars in the emerging sub-discipline of SFM.

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