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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Jose Dinis-Carvalho, Levi Guimaraes, Rui M. Sousa and Celina Pinto Leao

The purpose of this paper is to compare the well-known value stream mapping (VSM) with a recent tool named waste identification diagram (WID), regarding the capacity of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the well-known value stream mapping (VSM) with a recent tool named waste identification diagram (WID), regarding the capacity of information representation and easiness of interpretation.

Design/methodology/approach

The work begins with a brief literature review comparing the main tools for representation of production units, with special emphasis on VSM and WID, in terms of ability to identify several types of waste. Then, the authors developed the VSM and the WID of a specific production unit and after that several groups composed by students of Industrial Engineering (IE) and/or professionals from industry were asked to analyse/interpret only one of these diagrams. Finally, a questionnaire with closed and open questions was applied to the groups to evaluate the analysed tool.

Findings

In general, the results revealed that WID is more effective than VSM and participants recognized that most of the WID elements are relevant. Specifically, a measure coined overall effectiveness was applied (based on the response time and percentage of correct interpretations), indicating a clear advantage of WID (22 per cent of correct interpretations per minute) compared to VSM (9 per cent of correct interpretations per minute). The main drawback pointed to the WID is the lack of representation of the information flow.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the IE field by revealing WID as a new promising graphical tool for representation of production units, especially in terms of identification/quantification of wastes. The tool was quantitative and qualitatively evaluated by persons both from academia and industry.

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Rui M. Lima, José Dinis-Carvalho, Thiago A. Souza, Elisa Vieira and Bruno Gonçalves

Even though the implementation of lean in health care environments is relatively recent, it has been receiving a lot of attention in recent years. Partly because of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though the implementation of lean in health care environments is relatively recent, it has been receiving a lot of attention in recent years. Partly because of the fact that it is a recent field of practise and research and partly because the number of works developed in this field has grown rapidly, it is important to frequently update the perspectives on this field of investigation. Thus, this study aims to review the implementation of lean tools and techniques applied to hospital organizational areas in a five-year period, between 2014 and 2018, complementing some of the most relevant reviews already published. The most important criteria such as tools, methods and principles, hospital areas intervened, improvements and difficulties were assessed and quantified.

Design/methodology/approach

As starting point for this systematic literature review (SLR), a set of selected pre-existing review publications was used to support the current study and as the ground base for the expansion of the studies about lean health care. The current study contemplated 114 articles from a five-year period between 2014 and 2018. A subset of 58 of these articles was critically assessed to understand the application of lean tools and methods in different hospital areas.

Findings

The thorough analysis of selected articles show a lack of works in continuous improvement approaches when compared to the application of production organization methods, visual management and diagnosing and problem-solving tools. The reported improvement results demonstrate alignment with the principles and foundations of lean philosophy, but such results are presented in isolated initiatives and without robust evidence of long-term maintenance. Moreover, this study shows an evolution in the number of articles referring to lean implementation in hospital areas, but in its great majority, such articles report isolated implementations in different areas, not spreading those for the global organization. Thus, some of the main recommendations are the need to implement studies on complete flows of patients, drugs and materials, instead of isolated initiatives and strive to promote the cultural change of hospitals through structural changes, following new visions and strategic objectives, supported by real models of continuous structural and sustained improvement.

Originality/value

The current study develops a new perspective of the articles published under the thematic of lean health care, published in a recent period of five years, which are not completely covered by other works. Additionally, it explicitly applied, in an innovative way, an approach that used a set of previous reviews as the starting point for this SLR. In this way, it integrates approaches and categories from different SLRs, creating a framework of analysis that can be used by future researchers. Finally, it shows the most recent implementations of lean health care, exposing the current trends, improvements and also the main gaps.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Anabela C. Alves, José Dinis‐Carvalho and Rui M. Sousa

This paper aims to explore the lean production paradigm as promoter of workers' creativity and thinking potential, and recognize this human potential as a fundamental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the lean production paradigm as promoter of workers' creativity and thinking potential, and recognize this human potential as a fundamental asset for companies' growth and success, being a major factor to face the disturbing and unpredictable needs of current markets, providing companies with the necessary agility. The authors believe these thinkers are the base for an agile company and learning organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives were achieved through a deep literature review, starting with the Toyota production system (TPS) origins. Some industrial lean case studies were also explored to show that the adoption of a lean culture promotes a pro‐active attitude and behavior that are so important for companies nowadays.

Findings

This paper explores the association between lean production and the promotion of thinkers. For a long period, and even nowadays, it is common to consider the worker as just another production factor that the companies explore to obtain the maximum utilization. This was a result from the distorted knowledge of the Taylor principles and the Ford assembly line model, seeing the worker as a gear in the “big machine”. Lean production was seen, for many years and by many authors, as an extension of this Taylorist/Fordist model but this paper highlights lean production as a work organization model where the worker assumes a position of thinker, continuously looking for improvement and continuously looking for wastes. By reducing wastes, the company will be prepared to accommodate changes and will attain agility.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is mainly based on literature review and on some industrial case studies of lean implementations (recent or just a few years ago); a deep research is necessary on the cause‐effect relation between lean production adoption and promotion of thinkers.

Practical implications

Helping companies to recognize the importance of workers as thinkers will have relevant impacts through the reduction of waste and costs, improving quality and increase productivity and revenue. Also, for workers, this recognition means respect, self‐esteem and confidence, and, essentially, more satisfaction with work.

Social implications

With lean production and agility, better products will quickly reach society, contributing thus to clients' satisfaction. Also, lean companies' CEO and workers looking for wastes will lead to a reduction of energy consumption, raw materials needs and gas emissions (reducing pollution of air, land and water), producing only what is needed. Being satisfied with their work they will be happier contributing to the raising of the country's happiness.

Originality/value

The authors are not aware of similar research. The paper is meant for those who are interested in improving their companies' operations and workers' relationships.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Goran D. Putnik

This editorial aims to introduce the theme of the special issue: “Lean vs agile from an organizational sustainability, complexity and learning perspective”.

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial aims to introduce the theme of the special issue: “Lean vs agile from an organizational sustainability, complexity and learning perspective”.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of the editorial is that of a survey. In the first part it presents the relevance of the theme and in the second part it presents the papers included in the special issue, including their themes, findings and novel contributions.

Findings

The individual findings by the papers present significant new contributions in a deeper insight of the “lean” and “agile” philosophies, or approaches in, and to, organizations. It could be noticed that the controversies of the issue “lean vs. agile” still remain. However, it could be said that an eventual further investigation in the phenomenology of “lean” and “agile” will be more informed after consideration of the results presented in this special issue.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation should be undertaken on a more abstract “level” of the theories of “lean” and “agile” and their mutual relationship, such as theories about the internal processes of “lean”/“agile” users, general “lean”/“agile” theories, epistemology of “lean”/“agile”, and ontology of “lean”/“agile”, and relationship with learning organization and chaordic organization.

Practical implications

Readers, both theoreticians and practitioners, will find in this editorial a “guide” to the issues of their interest concerning the valuable explanations, ideas and tools, presented in the special issue, for both concrete applications in enterprises and organizations, and for further research and development of learning, complex and sustainable organizations, and towards new ideas and insights generation.

Originality/value

This editorial presents an analysis of the special issue on “lean vs agile”, contributing to the higher levels of the theories of “lean” and “agile” and their mutual relationship, namely to the theories about the internal processes of “lean”/“agile” users, general “lean”/“agile” theories, and epistemology of “lean”/“agile”.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Diana-Lucía Gómez-Molina and José Moyano-Fuentes

Implementing lean management (LM) provides universities with a variety of benefits and utilities. The purpose of this study is to systematically analyze the existing…

Abstract

Purpose

Implementing lean management (LM) provides universities with a variety of benefits and utilities. The purpose of this study is to systematically analyze the existing literature on the implementation of LM in universities.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review is undertaken to identify, select and evaluate the literature. A total of 68 articles were identified in Web of Science and Scopus, analyzed and synthesized from the first article published on the topic (2003) to mid-2020.

Findings

Literature analysis and evaluation have enabled us to offer a novel literature classification based around four research lines that summarize the empirical evidence on LM implementation in universities, namely, lean applied to academic management processes; lean applied to administrative management processes; factors that facilitate lean implementation and results obtained with lean. Finally, the gaps and challenges for future research into LM in universities are presented.

Originality/value

This study provides a characterization of the research carried out into LM implementation in universities, which facilitates the work of both scholars wishing either to begin or to dig deeper into this sphere and university professionals and managers pursuing the best outcomes from LM.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Diego Augusto de Jesus Pacheco, Isaac Pergher, José Antônio Valle Antunes Junior and Guilherme Luís Roehe Vaccaro

The purpose of this study is to compare different models integrating the TOC and Lean approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare different models integrating the TOC and Lean approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The models of reference were identified through a comprehensive literature review. A qualitative and comparative analysis was carried out by pointing out the strengths, weaknesses and gaps of models integrating the TOC and Lean based on the production system requirements.

Findings

The findings indicate that these models can be improved by introducing aspects related to the system structure such as main key performance indicators, type of shop layout and performance metrics to evaluate the improvements implemented in the production system. The results provided evidence that the TOC and Lean are complementary approaches, and the individual gaps of each approach seem to be, in the most part, offset by the virtues of the other.

Practical implications

This study enables decision makers and industrial managers to evaluate the practices adopted in the production environment, as well as the use of the different set of continuous improvement practices. This article also minimizes the literature gap regarding whether and how integrated Lean and TOC approach can be used in the firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of literature on Lean by comparing three different models integrating Lean and the TOC. Furthermore, a research agenda is suggested for future research aimed at developing new models integrating both approaches, aiming to increase the competitiveness of the production systems.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

José Chiu-C. Chen and Chen-Yang Cheng

The commercialization of non-profit organization (NPOs) has become a trend. Nonetheless, during the process of providing services and manufacturing products, NPOs…

Abstract

Purpose

The commercialization of non-profit organization (NPOs) has become a trend. Nonetheless, during the process of providing services and manufacturing products, NPOs frequently encounter obstacles, such as distinctive organizational characteristics and social loafing, which hinder development. These obstacles impede effective production management process, especially in responding to market competitive logic and associated demands. The purpose of this paper is to assist NPOs in resolving the unique challenges posed by commercialization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study first examined related literature on the social loafing and Lean-Kanban model. Subsequently, existing service procedures of the Assistive Technology Resource Center were introduced, and the loafing situation and operational management issues within the organization were analyzed. Based on observed experiences in the case study, this study investigated the social loafing situation that NPOs are likely to encounter during the commercialization process. Adaptive strategies were then proposed to mitigate this situation. Finally, this study presents a summary and analysis of the study results, and offers recommendations regarding future research directions.

Findings

The findings of this study provide valuable information regarding NPOs commercialization, indicating that an understanding of the non-profit concept in relation to internal and external customers must be incorporated into the commercialization process. Social loafing is a sensitive topic in organizational research, particularly for NPOs without HR professionals. This study recommends that NPOs use Lean-management tools to reduce operational management issues caused by various social loafing situations. Further interdisciplinary, integrated research on the commercialization of NPOs of various types should be conducted to clarify concerns regarding the overall NPO commercialization environment.

Originality/value

This study examined a social welfare foundation and applied the Lean thinking model to investigate whether Lean-management tools alleviate and eliminate social loafing. The solution depends on interdisciplinary integrated research for improving NPO management practice. These management tools can be used to adjust the division of labor and reduce operational management problems caused by social loafing. These tools can provide NPOs with a reference for establishing a fair and equitable internal work environment and developing strategies that respond to market pressure and efficiency during commercialization.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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