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Article

Hamilton Coimbra Carvalho and Jose Afonso Mazzon

This paper aims to expose the inadequacy of social marketing to tackle complex social problems, while proposing an expansion in the discipline’ conceptual repertoire. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to expose the inadequacy of social marketing to tackle complex social problems, while proposing an expansion in the discipline’ conceptual repertoire. The goal is to incorporate complexity tools, in particular from the system dynamics field, and the promotion of mindware within a true transdisciplinary paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses literature review to support the proposed theoretical development. It also presents a short case study.

Findings

Most problems that plague our modern societies have a distinctive complex nature that is not amenable to traditional social marketing interventions. Social marketing has simplified the problem of bringing about societal change by thinking that upstream social actors can be influenced in the same way as downstream individuals. This paper shows that this is not the case while proposing a framework to close this gap.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework is a theoretical one. It depends on further refinements and actual application to wicked problems.

Practical implications

Complex social problems – or wicked problems – remain widespread in modern societies. Moreover, they are getting worse over time. The paper presents a proposal to redefine the limits of the social marketing discipline so it can be more useful to tackle such problems. Practical approaches such as measuring the success of mindware in the marketplace of ideas are implied in the proposed framework.

Social implications

The increase in complexity of social problems has not been accompanied by an evolution in the discipline of social marketing. The lack of proper conceptual tools has prevented the discipline from contributing to tackling these problems effectively. Some interventions may actually worsen the underlying problems, as illustrated in the paper.

Originality/value

This paper identifies two major gaps associated with the social marketing discipline, in particular the lack of complexity and systems thinking and the forsaking of ideas (mindware) as a legitimate goal of the discipline. This realization corroborates the claim that boundaries among disciplines are often artificial, hindering the proper understanding of complex social problems. In turn, only the use of adequate conceptual lenses makes it possible to devise interventions and programs that tackle actual causes (instead of symptoms) of complex social problems.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article

Rafaela Almeida Cordeiro, Mateus Canniatti Ponchio and José Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether consumer evaluations of products are influenced by the presence of co-branding with a well-known reputable ingredient brand and whether differences in evaluations are related to the socioeconomic stratum of the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

These questions were investigated by way of two experiments: the first, using a between-subjects approach that was carried out with 210 subjects and the second, using between- and within-subjects approaches that were carried out with 305 subjects.

Findings

The results show that: products produced by both little-known and well-known brands are evaluated more favourably when they are co-branded with a well-known ingredient brand; there is no evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger for little-known brand products than for well-known brand products; and there is weak evidence that the co-branding effect on product evaluation is stronger among subjects from lower socioeconomic strata than among subjects from the upper stratum.

Research limitations/implications

The theory of anchoring alone is insufficient for explaining differences in product evaluations when the co-branding strategy is adopted. It is believed that positive effects can be also interpreted by the assimilation and signalling theories.

Practical implications

As for the managerial implications, the authors offer insights into the impacts of using a strategic co-branding alliance on the products of little-known brands among consumers from lower and upper strata.

Originality/value

The study contributes to consumer behaviour literature, specifically with regard to ingredient-brand effects in co-branding strategies from the perspective of the end consumer.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Martin Hernani-Merino, Juan G. Lazo Lazo, Alvaro Talavera López, José Afonso Mazzon and Gisella López-Tafur

Companies that wish to market a global brand need to develop a greater understanding of consumers' and potential consumers' susceptibility to global consumer culture…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies that wish to market a global brand need to develop a greater understanding of consumers' and potential consumers' susceptibility to global consumer culture (SGCC) with a view to standardizing/adapting their brand according to the desires and preferences of the consumers who belong to specific segments of global consumers. Thus, the aim of the study is to fill a joint segmentation research gap within and between countries based on seven dimensions of SGCC while classifying consumers according to the degree of belonging to specific and hybrid (global citizenship) segments.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was applied online in English in five countries across the Americas and Europe resulting in a sample of 412 consumers. Based on the fuzzy C-means cluster analysis, the study segments the sample of consumers according to the degree of belonging to specific and global citizenship segments.

Findings

Analysis of survey results show three groups; two distinct groups and a third with features of both, a distinct intersection group. These findings suggest that consumers in different countries develop beliefs and attitudes about global citizenship, and this perspective coincides with the characteristics of the intersection group. Consequently, the study shows that fragmentation of the needs of consumers exists within and between countries.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the concept of global citizenship, helping managers of global brands improve their marketing strategy decisions by implementing strategies that are standardized or adapted to specific hybrid segments of consumers that transcend national borders. This study used a statistical method to measure the degree of belonging to each segment.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article

Simone R. Barakat, Giuliana Isabella, João Maurício Gama Boaventura and José Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employee satisfaction. The study proposes and empirically tests…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and employee satisfaction. The study proposes and empirically tests two hypotheses: that CSR is positively associated with employee satisfaction, and that organizational image mediates the relationship between CSR and employee satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested through regression analyses, using data from 85,167 questionnaires completed by employees at 381 Brazilian companies, as well as data pertaining to the “breadth” of CSR engagement of those same companies.

Findings

The results of this study provide evidence that CSR-oriented actions undertaken by companies will lead to a better organizational image, and this, in turn, will lead to greater employee satisfaction.

Practical implications

Because employee behaviour influences organizational outcomes and higher job satisfaction may lead to greater employee commitment to organizational goals and values, understanding the impact of CSR on employee satisfaction is relevant to corporate performance.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the body of empirical research on CSR by investigating the underlying mechanisms linking CSR with employee behaviour. Scholars in the area of CSR regularly explore the outcomes and impacts of CSR actions on internal and external stakeholders. However, the impacts of CSR for a critical group of stakeholders – namely, employees – and its underlying mechanisms are understudied in the CSR literature.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Hamilton Coimbra Carvalho, José Afonso Mazzon and Joaquim Rocha Santos

The purpose of this paper is the development of a framework to address complex social problems. The paper proposes an integrative framework inspired in complexity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the development of a framework to address complex social problems. The paper proposes an integrative framework inspired in complexity sciences, using it to explain the demise of cigarettes in recent decades.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the method of system dynamics to represent the complexity inherent in most social ecosystems where social marketers operate.

Findings

The framework identifies the major determinants of complex problems in social ecosystems, giving emphasis to the role performed by endogenous social structures. The paper presents the results of a simulation replicating the evolution of perceived attractiveness of cigarettes in recent decades, highlighting the role of the Surgeon General’s 1964 report in the USA as a catalyst force that accelerated the process of change.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations derive from the use of the system dynamics method, in particular the high level of aggregation of variables. Implications include the potential for increased cross-fertilization between social marketing and other disciplines concerned with social change.

Practical implications

The eight elements that compose the proposed framework can be identified or applied to any social ecosystem, helping in the identification of points with high leverage for social change.

Social implications

Proper understanding of how complex social problems arise is vital to increase the odds of success of social marketing interventions. The paper also highlights common threads in the development of problems in different social ecosystems.

Originality/value

The paper presents a novel framework for addressing the complexity inherent to the social ecosystems where social marketers operate.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article

Júlio Püschel, José Afonso Mazzon and José Mauro C. Hernandez

This paper's objective is to propose an integrated framework to investigate the adoption intention of mobile banking technology and to test it in the Brazilian context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's objective is to propose an integrated framework to investigate the adoption intention of mobile banking technology and to test it in the Brazilian context.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 666 respondents from the most economically developed cities in Brazil were surveyed. The sample comprised 333 mobile banking users and 333 mobile banking non‐users. Partial least squares was used to analyze the proposed framework's construct relations.

Findings

The framework offers an integrated view, taking into account more predictors than other studies on the adoption of innovations. For non‐users, the framework was able to explain approximately 69 percent of the dependent variable (intention to adopt mobile banking) variation, which is a figure higher than those obtained in previous studies. However, for current users of mobile banking, only 27 percent of the dependent variable variation was explained by the framework. It was also observed that the predictors' influence over the criterion variable was different for each group of mobile banking users and non‐users.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the proposed integrated framework offers a deeper understanding of the variables that influence the adoption of mobile banking.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article

José Mauro C. Hernandez and José Afonso Mazzon

This study proposes a new method to investigate adoption of new technologies and tests this method by looking into the determinants of internet banking adoption in Brazil.

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a new method to investigate adoption of new technologies and tests this method by looking into the determinants of internet banking adoption in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 600 respondents living in one of the biggest cities in Brazil were sampled for interviewing: 300 were internet bank users, 150 were internet but not internet bank users, and 150 were neither internet nor internet bank users.

Findings

The adjusted coefficient of determination in the multiple linear regression equation (dependent variable: intention to use/continue to use IB) was 60 percent and the main effects of the eight variables proved significant (relative advantage of control, compatibility with lifestyle, image, subjective norm, self‐efficacy, relative advantage of security and privacy, results demonstrability, and trialability). The McFaden pseudo coefficient of determination in the multinomial logistic regression equation (dependent variable: a dummy variable for each of the three groups analyzed) ranged from 45 percent to 69 percent. The findings show that the variables that influence the intention to use/continue to use IB are not exactly the same as those that influence actual adoption. Specifically, the results seem to suggest that intention to use IB is influenced solely by people's beliefs about IB, while its actual adoption is influenced also by individual characteristics.

Originality/value

The findings herein suggest that the proposed integrated model offers superior ability to explain adoption of internet banking to that of the models elected by previous studies. Furthermore, the model looks not only into the intentions but also into actual adoption.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article

Hamilton Coimbra Carvalho and José Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to bring forth the limitations of some important models of cognition and behavior adopted by social marketers and present important findings…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring forth the limitations of some important models of cognition and behavior adopted by social marketers and present important findings from recent lines of research that contribute to a fine‐grained understanding of human behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that presents a review of several theoretical approaches to human cognition and behavior and their implications regarding social marketing campaigns.

Findings

It is concluded that the assumptions underlying traditional models of behavior need to be revised, especially the assumption that human beings are rational decision makers – the prototypical homo economicus. Behavioral science has revealed that people are far from being rational and are prone to be influenced by myriad factors, some deemed irrelevant under rational models. Social marketing interventions have greater probability of success when they rely on more realistic assumptions of human behavior.

Research limitations/implications

Social marketing needs to embrace the contributions of the several disciplines and lines of research centered on the study of all facets of human behavior, such as behavioral economics and dual‐system framework.

Practical implications

The main implications are: the recommendation to assume people are running on their System 1 when they are in contact with social marketing campaigns, the need to consider the interplay of systems and selves over time, the recommended emphasis on place strategies, and the need to avoid cash incentives and silver bullets.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is in contrasting the assumptions of traditional models of cognition and behavior widely used in social marketing with the evidence from several lines of research portraying influences in human behavior not accounted by those models.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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Article

Hamilton Coimbra Carvalho and Jose Afonso Mazzon

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a broader societal trend toward the full realization of human potential and the points of convergence with social marketing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a broader societal trend toward the full realization of human potential and the points of convergence with social marketing. The ultimate goal of social marketing is to increase social good. The paper defines social good in a new light and makes the connection to well-being clearer, proposing an agenda for social marketers and highlighting the opportunities for a better positioning of social marketing in the marketplace of ideas.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper presents an overview of concepts and evidence on the drivers of human well-being. It also discusses some important questions at a broader societal level, such as the role of money and income on happiness and well-being. It presents the connections between this body of knowledge and social marketing, including a literature review from both fields.

Findings

Eliminating ill-being no longer seems satisfactory from a societal point of view in the current Zeitgeist. Societies have been searching for ways to alleviate illnesses and to increase the well-being of its citizens. Social marketing, as a powerful social technology for behavior change, must be part of this broader movement, achieving a better positioning in the marketplace of ideas. The paper proposes a six-point agenda to reach these goals.

Research limitations/implications

The main theoretical implication is a call for social marketers to see the ultimate goal of the discipline (social good) under a new lens. This requires an update in the conceptual frameworks that orient the discipline. Another implication is the need for better upstream conceptual models in social marketing.

Practical implications

The paper suggest some practical implications, such as the opportunity to expand social marketing to countries that do not use it, the use of well-being drivers as inputs, means and outcomes in social marketing programs, and the role of the discipline in both alleviating poverty and in demarketing efforts.

Originality/value

The paper contributes by taking an outside perspective and a transdisciplinary approach. The fulfillment of human potential demands the attention to different drivers of human behavior and the search for new social solutions. It also requires a clear understanding of the role of factors like money and social connectedness. This paper approaches these questions with answers grounded on the existing evidence while providing some points for the development of social marketing theory and practice.

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Article

– This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Eliminating ill-being no longer seems satisfactory from a societal point of view in the current Zeitgeist. Societies have been searching for ways to alleviate illnesses and to increase the well-being of its citizens. Social marketing, as a powerful social technology for behavior change, must be part of this broader movement, achieving a better positioning in the marketplace of ideas. The paper proposes a six-point agenda to reach these goals.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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