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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Jorge Ginieniewicz and Kwame McKenzie

The paper's aim is to determine whether the SAFE (acculturative stress), PHQ‐9 (depressive symptoms) and MSPSS (individual social resources) scales are considered acceptable…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to determine whether the SAFE (acculturative stress), PHQ‐9 (depressive symptoms) and MSPSS (individual social resources) scales are considered acceptable measures to be used in the Spanish‐speaking Latin American immigrant population in Toronto.

Design/methodology/approach

The PHQ9, MSPSS and SAFE were completed by a group of ten Spanish‐speaking Latin Americans recruited through an organization that offers services to immigrants in Toronto. The need for clarification of questions was noted as well as the comments that respondents made to the process.

Findings

Participants felt comfortable responding the questionnaire. There was little duplication when the three scales were used together. The average time to complete the survey was 21 minutes.

Originality/value

There has been no community based quantitative study of mental health in the Spanish‐speaking community in Toronto that has used the SAFE (acculturative stress), PHQ‐9 (depressive symptoms) and MSPSS (individual social resources) scales. This pilot study tested the suitability of these scales with this population. The PHQ9, SAFE and MSPSS are acceptable scales to be used in surveys in the Spanish‐speaking Latin American population in Toronto.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Laura Lachance, Michael Sean Martin, Pamela Kaduri, Paula Godoy-Paiz, Jorge Ginieniewicz, Valerie Tarasuk and Kwame McKenzie

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of adolescents’ perceptions of food insecurity and diet quality, and the impact that these factors have on mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of adolescents’ perceptions of food insecurity and diet quality, and the impact that these factors have on mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a community-based research approach. It gathered qualitative data from 11 in-depth interviews conducted with adolescents aged 13-19. Participants were recruited through various programmes they attended at a community organization in Toronto.

Findings

Overall, results indicate that respondents clearly identified a linkage between food insecurity and mental health. They also identified several effects of poor diet quality on mental health. Respondents understood food insecurity and poor diet quality to exist on a continuum. However, they also identified other reasons for making poor dietary choices such as peer pressure. Mental health effects of food insecurity and poor diet quality included sadness, stress, worry, anger, shame, impaired concentration, and fatigue.

Practical implications

This research will help to inform future research design in the field of social determinants of mental health. As well, the findings will help guide the development of interventions targeted towards this vulnerable age group.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative study to explore food insecurity and poor diet quality, as existing on a continuum, from the perspective of adolescents. The authors are also the first to explore the impact of these factors on the mental health of adolescents, based on their own understanding. What is more, the authors focused on a culturally diverse population living in an underprivileged neighbourhood in Toronto. The authors chose this population because they are at higher risk of both food insecurity and poor diet quality.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

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